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Friday, March 14

Open Drawing Workshop

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This is a monitored, non-instructional workshop in which artists can work at their own pace in the medium of their selection (no turpentine-based oil paints, please) from a live model in short and sustained poses. Chairs and a limited number of easels are available. Students must provide their own materials. Come as often as you like throughout the year. REGISTRATION IS NOT REQUIRED —just drop in and pay at the door ($12/$10 ACP members). View more information or register.

Saturday, March 15

Intro: Precious Metal Clay

- $150

*** Pre-Registration required: Monday March 3 at noon deadline ***
Become an Alchemist! Join us and turn clay into silver jewelry and treasures in one afternoon!
Precious Metal Clay (PMC) feels and reacts like clay, dries like clay, and when fired in a kiln, becomes solid fine silver. We will cover care and use of precious metal clay, various forms of metal clay (paste, syringe, slip), tools and supplies, basic construction, rolling, texturing, cutting, coiling, layering and joining. We will also cover firing, brushing, and polishing. PMC is perfect for those comfortable working with clay and this workshop is a fun activity to share with a friend, daughter, sister, or spouse. Make one-of-a-kind silver creations that you will be proud to wear or give as gifts: buttons, charms, earrings, key fob, bead, or decorative object of your choice. Bring lunch or snack and you may want to bring a notebook and pencil. Basic tools will be provided, however a materials fee which ranges depending on clay use, starts at around $50 (depending upon silver price at that time) – this will be collected by the instructor.
***CLASS IS FILLED. PLEASE EMAIL US AT osbrown@artscouncilofprinceton.org TO BE PLACED ON A WAITING LIST!!
View more information or register.

Soldered Gemstone Ring

- $95

New date/time/format!
Participants in this exciting new workshop will learn how to take a cabochon stone and create a hand-fabricated “bezel cup” which will then be soldered to a ring band. These techniques are at the very foundation for anyone who is serious about making silver (or even gold) jewelry. Students who took Simple Soldered Pendant will be able to use their new soldering skills to further their knowledge of jewelry making. However, even if you’ve never picked up a torch, you will be able to jump right in and learn these techniques. Students in this workshop will come away with such skills as: annealing metal, cutting; soldering; creating a bezel to fit a stone; sizing and fabricating a ring band; attaching the bezel to the ring band; stone setting; filing, sanding and cleanup of the finished piece; polishing options. All work will be done in silver (pure .999 silver and sterling .925 silver) with a semi-precious stone such as onyx.
Materials fee for the workshop is $60. Kits include silver bezel wire, gemstone cabochon, silver for ring band. Pliers will be sold in class for $15. If you have tools bring them to class.

View more information or register.

Open Drawing Workshop

-

This is a monitored, non-instructional workshop in which artists can work at their own pace in the medium of their selection (no turpentine-based oil paints, please) from a live model in short and sustained poses. Chairs and a limited number of easels are available. Students must provide their own materials. Come as often as you like throughout the year. REGISTRATION IS NOT REQUIRED —just drop in and pay at the door ($12/$10 ACP members). View more information or register.

Extraordinary Mash-Ups

Ilya Genin has a refreshing, provocative take on present day Cuba. Born and raised behind the Iron Curtain, now an American citizen, Genin first learned of Cuba through Soviet messaging. Cuba was a poster child for the common persons’s struggle. Cuba’s accomplishments were, of course, heavily subsidized by the Soviet Union, and Genin viewed these successes through the lens of his own daily life in the Ukraine. Skepticism was an appropriate response.MashUps

The Soviet Union fell, Genin immigrated to the United States, and the island of Cuba became even more isolated. Now, in the United States, the messaging Genin received was quite different. Cuba was a failed pariah. Its struggling economy, lack of modernity, and uncertain prospects held the island residents captive, both physically and spiritually. In America, Cuba was portrayed as a poster child for failed, left wing ideology. Had the pendulum swung back too far in the opposite direction?

Whether or not the Cuban experiment was a success, a third, and comparably self-serving viewpoint further ensnared the media’s attention. Cuba was, and still is, highly photogenic. Visitors find their experience there to be visually ripe with low hanging fruit. Cuba is a time machine, a portal into the past. In Cuba it is still possible to photograph a living culture of not-yet post-modern people.

Lesser photographers latch onto either A, B, or C, above, and join the chorus of their brethren. Theirs is a simplified telling, an opaque veneer resting upon unresolved complexity. We may marvel at the superficial, but difficult questions are neither posed nor addressed. Genin knows that there is both truth and falsehood to be found in each of the three perspectives. He plays them off against one another, triangulating between legend, history, and human experience. Both point and counter-point are expressed in the same image.

Genin uses digital collages to express that Cuba has been the subject of extraordinary mash-ups. These include the collision of African with Spanish culture, Capitalism with Communism, religion with sexual independence, and of necessity with principle. Not to mention the Cuban obsession with their principal oppressor’s sport, baseball.

Cuban culture has inclusively absorbed all of these influences. Cubans have harnessed diverse, sometimes conflicting forces to forge an imperfect union. Genin affirms that Cubans have nothing to apologize for. But Genin’s photographs also show us much more. We see that Cubans are self-aware, scarred, secure, passionate, practical, involved, engaged, acquiescent, loving, and, most of all, human.

Like Cuba itself, Ilya Genin’s vision is complex. It is tinged with darkness as well as with hope.

Ricardo Barros, Curator

Sunday, March 16

Open Drawing Workshop

-

This is a monitored, non-instructional workshop in which artists can work at their own pace in the medium of their selection (no turpentine-based oil paints, please) from a live model in short and sustained poses. Chairs and a limited number of easels are available. Students must provide their own materials. Come as often as you like throughout the year. REGISTRATION IS NOT REQUIRED —just drop in and pay at the door ($12/$10 ACP members). View more information or register.

Extraordinary Mash-Ups

Ilya Genin has a refreshing, provocative take on present day Cuba. Born and raised behind the Iron Curtain, now an American citizen, Genin first learned of Cuba through Soviet messaging. Cuba was a poster child for the common persons’s struggle. Cuba’s accomplishments were, of course, heavily subsidized by the Soviet Union, and Genin viewed these successes through the lens of his own daily life in the Ukraine. Skepticism was an appropriate response.MashUps

The Soviet Union fell, Genin immigrated to the United States, and the island of Cuba became even more isolated. Now, in the United States, the messaging Genin received was quite different. Cuba was a failed pariah. Its struggling economy, lack of modernity, and uncertain prospects held the island residents captive, both physically and spiritually. In America, Cuba was portrayed as a poster child for failed, left wing ideology. Had the pendulum swung back too far in the opposite direction?

Whether or not the Cuban experiment was a success, a third, and comparably self-serving viewpoint further ensnared the media’s attention. Cuba was, and still is, highly photogenic. Visitors find their experience there to be visually ripe with low hanging fruit. Cuba is a time machine, a portal into the past. In Cuba it is still possible to photograph a living culture of not-yet post-modern people.

Lesser photographers latch onto either A, B, or C, above, and join the chorus of their brethren. Theirs is a simplified telling, an opaque veneer resting upon unresolved complexity. We may marvel at the superficial, but difficult questions are neither posed nor addressed. Genin knows that there is both truth and falsehood to be found in each of the three perspectives. He plays them off against one another, triangulating between legend, history, and human experience. Both point and counter-point are expressed in the same image.

Genin uses digital collages to express that Cuba has been the subject of extraordinary mash-ups. These include the collision of African with Spanish culture, Capitalism with Communism, religion with sexual independence, and of necessity with principle. Not to mention the Cuban obsession with their principal oppressor’s sport, baseball.

Cuban culture has inclusively absorbed all of these influences. Cubans have harnessed diverse, sometimes conflicting forces to forge an imperfect union. Genin affirms that Cubans have nothing to apologize for. But Genin’s photographs also show us much more. We see that Cubans are self-aware, scarred, secure, passionate, practical, involved, engaged, acquiescent, loving, and, most of all, human.

Like Cuba itself, Ilya Genin’s vision is complex. It is tinged with darkness as well as with hope.

Ricardo Barros, Curator

Monday, March 17

Open Drawing Workshop

-

This is a monitored, non-instructional workshop in which artists can work at their own pace in the medium of their selection (no turpentine-based oil paints, please) from a live model in short and sustained poses. Chairs and a limited number of easels are available. Students must provide their own materials. Come as often as you like throughout the year. REGISTRATION IS NOT REQUIRED —just drop in and pay at the door ($12/$10 ACP members). View more information or register.

Extraordinary Mash-Ups

Ilya Genin has a refreshing, provocative take on present day Cuba. Born and raised behind the Iron Curtain, now an American citizen, Genin first learned of Cuba through Soviet messaging. Cuba was a poster child for the common persons’s struggle. Cuba’s accomplishments were, of course, heavily subsidized by the Soviet Union, and Genin viewed these successes through the lens of his own daily life in the Ukraine. Skepticism was an appropriate response.MashUps

The Soviet Union fell, Genin immigrated to the United States, and the island of Cuba became even more isolated. Now, in the United States, the messaging Genin received was quite different. Cuba was a failed pariah. Its struggling economy, lack of modernity, and uncertain prospects held the island residents captive, both physically and spiritually. In America, Cuba was portrayed as a poster child for failed, left wing ideology. Had the pendulum swung back too far in the opposite direction?

Whether or not the Cuban experiment was a success, a third, and comparably self-serving viewpoint further ensnared the media’s attention. Cuba was, and still is, highly photogenic. Visitors find their experience there to be visually ripe with low hanging fruit. Cuba is a time machine, a portal into the past. In Cuba it is still possible to photograph a living culture of not-yet post-modern people.

Lesser photographers latch onto either A, B, or C, above, and join the chorus of their brethren. Theirs is a simplified telling, an opaque veneer resting upon unresolved complexity. We may marvel at the superficial, but difficult questions are neither posed nor addressed. Genin knows that there is both truth and falsehood to be found in each of the three perspectives. He plays them off against one another, triangulating between legend, history, and human experience. Both point and counter-point are expressed in the same image.

Genin uses digital collages to express that Cuba has been the subject of extraordinary mash-ups. These include the collision of African with Spanish culture, Capitalism with Communism, religion with sexual independence, and of necessity with principle. Not to mention the Cuban obsession with their principal oppressor’s sport, baseball.

Cuban culture has inclusively absorbed all of these influences. Cubans have harnessed diverse, sometimes conflicting forces to forge an imperfect union. Genin affirms that Cubans have nothing to apologize for. But Genin’s photographs also show us much more. We see that Cubans are self-aware, scarred, secure, passionate, practical, involved, engaged, acquiescent, loving, and, most of all, human.

Like Cuba itself, Ilya Genin’s vision is complex. It is tinged with darkness as well as with hope.

Ricardo Barros, Curator

Tuesday, March 18

Extraordinary Mash-Ups

Ilya Genin has a refreshing, provocative take on present day Cuba. Born and raised behind the Iron Curtain, now an American citizen, Genin first learned of Cuba through Soviet messaging. Cuba was a poster child for the common persons’s struggle. Cuba’s accomplishments were, of course, heavily subsidized by the Soviet Union, and Genin viewed these successes through the lens of his own daily life in the Ukraine. Skepticism was an appropriate response.MashUps

The Soviet Union fell, Genin immigrated to the United States, and the island of Cuba became even more isolated. Now, in the United States, the messaging Genin received was quite different. Cuba was a failed pariah. Its struggling economy, lack of modernity, and uncertain prospects held the island residents captive, both physically and spiritually. In America, Cuba was portrayed as a poster child for failed, left wing ideology. Had the pendulum swung back too far in the opposite direction?

Whether or not the Cuban experiment was a success, a third, and comparably self-serving viewpoint further ensnared the media’s attention. Cuba was, and still is, highly photogenic. Visitors find their experience there to be visually ripe with low hanging fruit. Cuba is a time machine, a portal into the past. In Cuba it is still possible to photograph a living culture of not-yet post-modern people.

Lesser photographers latch onto either A, B, or C, above, and join the chorus of their brethren. Theirs is a simplified telling, an opaque veneer resting upon unresolved complexity. We may marvel at the superficial, but difficult questions are neither posed nor addressed. Genin knows that there is both truth and falsehood to be found in each of the three perspectives. He plays them off against one another, triangulating between legend, history, and human experience. Both point and counter-point are expressed in the same image.

Genin uses digital collages to express that Cuba has been the subject of extraordinary mash-ups. These include the collision of African with Spanish culture, Capitalism with Communism, religion with sexual independence, and of necessity with principle. Not to mention the Cuban obsession with their principal oppressor’s sport, baseball.

Cuban culture has inclusively absorbed all of these influences. Cubans have harnessed diverse, sometimes conflicting forces to forge an imperfect union. Genin affirms that Cubans have nothing to apologize for. But Genin’s photographs also show us much more. We see that Cubans are self-aware, scarred, secure, passionate, practical, involved, engaged, acquiescent, loving, and, most of all, human.

Like Cuba itself, Ilya Genin’s vision is complex. It is tinged with darkness as well as with hope.

Ricardo Barros, Curator

Wednesday, March 19

Extraordinary Mash-Ups

Ilya Genin has a refreshing, provocative take on present day Cuba. Born and raised behind the Iron Curtain, now an American citizen, Genin first learned of Cuba through Soviet messaging. Cuba was a poster child for the common persons’s struggle. Cuba’s accomplishments were, of course, heavily subsidized by the Soviet Union, and Genin viewed these successes through the lens of his own daily life in the Ukraine. Skepticism was an appropriate response.MashUps

The Soviet Union fell, Genin immigrated to the United States, and the island of Cuba became even more isolated. Now, in the United States, the messaging Genin received was quite different. Cuba was a failed pariah. Its struggling economy, lack of modernity, and uncertain prospects held the island residents captive, both physically and spiritually. In America, Cuba was portrayed as a poster child for failed, left wing ideology. Had the pendulum swung back too far in the opposite direction?

Whether or not the Cuban experiment was a success, a third, and comparably self-serving viewpoint further ensnared the media’s attention. Cuba was, and still is, highly photogenic. Visitors find their experience there to be visually ripe with low hanging fruit. Cuba is a time machine, a portal into the past. In Cuba it is still possible to photograph a living culture of not-yet post-modern people.

Lesser photographers latch onto either A, B, or C, above, and join the chorus of their brethren. Theirs is a simplified telling, an opaque veneer resting upon unresolved complexity. We may marvel at the superficial, but difficult questions are neither posed nor addressed. Genin knows that there is both truth and falsehood to be found in each of the three perspectives. He plays them off against one another, triangulating between legend, history, and human experience. Both point and counter-point are expressed in the same image.

Genin uses digital collages to express that Cuba has been the subject of extraordinary mash-ups. These include the collision of African with Spanish culture, Capitalism with Communism, religion with sexual independence, and of necessity with principle. Not to mention the Cuban obsession with their principal oppressor’s sport, baseball.

Cuban culture has inclusively absorbed all of these influences. Cubans have harnessed diverse, sometimes conflicting forces to forge an imperfect union. Genin affirms that Cubans have nothing to apologize for. But Genin’s photographs also show us much more. We see that Cubans are self-aware, scarred, secure, passionate, practical, involved, engaged, acquiescent, loving, and, most of all, human.

Like Cuba itself, Ilya Genin’s vision is complex. It is tinged with darkness as well as with hope.

Ricardo Barros, Curator

Thursday, March 20

Extraordinary Mash-Ups

Ilya Genin has a refreshing, provocative take on present day Cuba. Born and raised behind the Iron Curtain, now an American citizen, Genin first learned of Cuba through Soviet messaging. Cuba was a poster child for the common persons’s struggle. Cuba’s accomplishments were, of course, heavily subsidized by the Soviet Union, and Genin viewed these successes through the lens of his own daily life in the Ukraine. Skepticism was an appropriate response.MashUps

The Soviet Union fell, Genin immigrated to the United States, and the island of Cuba became even more isolated. Now, in the United States, the messaging Genin received was quite different. Cuba was a failed pariah. Its struggling economy, lack of modernity, and uncertain prospects held the island residents captive, both physically and spiritually. In America, Cuba was portrayed as a poster child for failed, left wing ideology. Had the pendulum swung back too far in the opposite direction?

Whether or not the Cuban experiment was a success, a third, and comparably self-serving viewpoint further ensnared the media’s attention. Cuba was, and still is, highly photogenic. Visitors find their experience there to be visually ripe with low hanging fruit. Cuba is a time machine, a portal into the past. In Cuba it is still possible to photograph a living culture of not-yet post-modern people.

Lesser photographers latch onto either A, B, or C, above, and join the chorus of their brethren. Theirs is a simplified telling, an opaque veneer resting upon unresolved complexity. We may marvel at the superficial, but difficult questions are neither posed nor addressed. Genin knows that there is both truth and falsehood to be found in each of the three perspectives. He plays them off against one another, triangulating between legend, history, and human experience. Both point and counter-point are expressed in the same image.

Genin uses digital collages to express that Cuba has been the subject of extraordinary mash-ups. These include the collision of African with Spanish culture, Capitalism with Communism, religion with sexual independence, and of necessity with principle. Not to mention the Cuban obsession with their principal oppressor’s sport, baseball.

Cuban culture has inclusively absorbed all of these influences. Cubans have harnessed diverse, sometimes conflicting forces to forge an imperfect union. Genin affirms that Cubans have nothing to apologize for. But Genin’s photographs also show us much more. We see that Cubans are self-aware, scarred, secure, passionate, practical, involved, engaged, acquiescent, loving, and, most of all, human.

Like Cuba itself, Ilya Genin’s vision is complex. It is tinged with darkness as well as with hope.

Ricardo Barros, Curator