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Sunday, April 6

Photo: ACP & PUGC

- $115

Come and discover the power of your camera and learn the elements of good artistic composition during a photo shoot at Princeton University Graduate College on Day 1 of this weekend workshop.  Day 2 will be spent in ACP’s Digital Studio gaining a better understanding of how to work with software, moving from the newly formed images on the monitor to the realization of a print ready digital image file.
 
DAY 1: Saturday, April 5 at 1-4pm at PU Graduate College
[88 College Road West in Princeton]
Participants will have ample time to explore the grounds to capture images, talk about photography and answer individual questions. Instruction will be given in the basic elements of good photographic composition, including leading lines, pattern, symmetry, rule of thirds, texture, and framing. Along the way students will be guided through shooting manually using ISO’s, Shutter Speeds, f-Stops, and Depth of Field, among other topics. The intent of the workshop is for participants to have fun, while becoming more comfortable with the operation of their cameras and their abilities to express themselves through it.  Please dress appropriately for the weather and comfortable walking shoes are recommended. Rain or shine!
Discover the special features of the collegiate gothic architecture and capture the unique 
charm of this historic site. 
For more information about PUGC visit their website: www.princeton.edu/~gradcol/
 
DAY 2: Sunday, April 6 at 10am-1pm at the Arts Council of Princeton
[102 Witherspoon Street in Princeton]
The intent of this follow-up session is to give the student a methodology for working effectively with the software side of digital photography, moving from the newly formed images on the monitor to the realization of a print ready digital image file. While working in ACP’s Digital Imaging Lab, Bill will guide students through the basics of digital image “Work Flow”, starting with Lightroom’s Library module to organizing images, entering Meta Data, Key Words, copyright information, as well as renaming of image files. Image correcting will occur in Lightroom’s Develop module, covering, Color Space settings, Color Management, and the basics of good “Non-Destructive Image Construction”.

View more information or register.

Alla Prima Painting: W/S (Apr)

- $450

These 3-day workshops focus on mastering three aspects of technique in oil painting: the palette, the canvas, and the set-up. More specifically, these workshops will cover palette organization, control of color in tonal painting, alla prima painting technique, use of mediums, various grounds, how to set-up a still life, composition, and learning to see in abstract terms. Each day will consist of a 1-hour lecture and demonstration, followed by painting time with one-on-one instruction.
Class size is limited to 8 students.
Bring a snack and beverage to enjoy during breaks.
Meets Fri 4/4 2-6pm; Sat 4/5 2-6pm; and Sun 4/6 10am-2pm.
A second weekend session is scheduled for May 2-4 View more information or register.

Open Drawing Workshop

-

This is a monitored, non-instructional workshop in which artists can work at their own pace in the medium of their selection (no turpentine-based oil paints, please) from a live model in short and sustained poses. Chairs and a limited number of easels are available. Students must provide their own materials. Come as often as you like throughout the year. REGISTRATION IS NOT REQUIRED —just drop in and pay at the door ($12/$10 ACP members). View more information or register.

Extraordinary Mash-Ups

Ilya Genin has a refreshing, provocative take on present day Cuba. Born and raised behind the Iron Curtain, now an American citizen, Genin first learned of Cuba through Soviet messaging. Cuba was a poster child for the common persons’s struggle. Cuba’s accomplishments were, of course, heavily subsidized by the Soviet Union, and Genin viewed these successes through the lens of his own daily life in the Ukraine. Skepticism was an appropriate response.MashUps

The Soviet Union fell, Genin immigrated to the United States, and the island of Cuba became even more isolated. Now, in the United States, the messaging Genin received was quite different. Cuba was a failed pariah. Its struggling economy, lack of modernity, and uncertain prospects held the island residents captive, both physically and spiritually. In America, Cuba was portrayed as a poster child for failed, left wing ideology. Had the pendulum swung back too far in the opposite direction?

Whether or not the Cuban experiment was a success, a third, and comparably self-serving viewpoint further ensnared the media’s attention. Cuba was, and still is, highly photogenic. Visitors find their experience there to be visually ripe with low hanging fruit. Cuba is a time machine, a portal into the past. In Cuba it is still possible to photograph a living culture of not-yet post-modern people.

Lesser photographers latch onto either A, B, or C, above, and join the chorus of their brethren. Theirs is a simplified telling, an opaque veneer resting upon unresolved complexity. We may marvel at the superficial, but difficult questions are neither posed nor addressed. Genin knows that there is both truth and falsehood to be found in each of the three perspectives. He plays them off against one another, triangulating between legend, history, and human experience. Both point and counter-point are expressed in the same image.

Genin uses digital collages to express that Cuba has been the subject of extraordinary mash-ups. These include the collision of African with Spanish culture, Capitalism with Communism, religion with sexual independence, and of necessity with principle. Not to mention the Cuban obsession with their principal oppressor’s sport, baseball.

Cuban culture has inclusively absorbed all of these influences. Cubans have harnessed diverse, sometimes conflicting forces to forge an imperfect union. Genin affirms that Cubans have nothing to apologize for. But Genin’s photographs also show us much more. We see that Cubans are self-aware, scarred, secure, passionate, practical, involved, engaged, acquiescent, loving, and, most of all, human.

Like Cuba itself, Ilya Genin’s vision is complex. It is tinged with darkness as well as with hope.

Ricardo Barros, Curator

Monday, April 7

Open Drawing Workshop

-

This is a monitored, non-instructional workshop in which artists can work at their own pace in the medium of their selection (no turpentine-based oil paints, please) from a live model in short and sustained poses. Chairs and a limited number of easels are available. Students must provide their own materials. Come as often as you like throughout the year. REGISTRATION IS NOT REQUIRED —just drop in and pay at the door ($12/$10 ACP members). View more information or register.

Extraordinary Mash-Ups

Ilya Genin has a refreshing, provocative take on present day Cuba. Born and raised behind the Iron Curtain, now an American citizen, Genin first learned of Cuba through Soviet messaging. Cuba was a poster child for the common persons’s struggle. Cuba’s accomplishments were, of course, heavily subsidized by the Soviet Union, and Genin viewed these successes through the lens of his own daily life in the Ukraine. Skepticism was an appropriate response.MashUps

The Soviet Union fell, Genin immigrated to the United States, and the island of Cuba became even more isolated. Now, in the United States, the messaging Genin received was quite different. Cuba was a failed pariah. Its struggling economy, lack of modernity, and uncertain prospects held the island residents captive, both physically and spiritually. In America, Cuba was portrayed as a poster child for failed, left wing ideology. Had the pendulum swung back too far in the opposite direction?

Whether or not the Cuban experiment was a success, a third, and comparably self-serving viewpoint further ensnared the media’s attention. Cuba was, and still is, highly photogenic. Visitors find their experience there to be visually ripe with low hanging fruit. Cuba is a time machine, a portal into the past. In Cuba it is still possible to photograph a living culture of not-yet post-modern people.

Lesser photographers latch onto either A, B, or C, above, and join the chorus of their brethren. Theirs is a simplified telling, an opaque veneer resting upon unresolved complexity. We may marvel at the superficial, but difficult questions are neither posed nor addressed. Genin knows that there is both truth and falsehood to be found in each of the three perspectives. He plays them off against one another, triangulating between legend, history, and human experience. Both point and counter-point are expressed in the same image.

Genin uses digital collages to express that Cuba has been the subject of extraordinary mash-ups. These include the collision of African with Spanish culture, Capitalism with Communism, religion with sexual independence, and of necessity with principle. Not to mention the Cuban obsession with their principal oppressor’s sport, baseball.

Cuban culture has inclusively absorbed all of these influences. Cubans have harnessed diverse, sometimes conflicting forces to forge an imperfect union. Genin affirms that Cubans have nothing to apologize for. But Genin’s photographs also show us much more. We see that Cubans are self-aware, scarred, secure, passionate, practical, involved, engaged, acquiescent, loving, and, most of all, human.

Like Cuba itself, Ilya Genin’s vision is complex. It is tinged with darkness as well as with hope.

Ricardo Barros, Curator

Tuesday, April 8

Open Drawing Workshop

-

This is a monitored, non-instructional workshop in which artists can work at their own pace in the medium of their selection (no turpentine-based oil paints, please) from a live model in short and sustained poses. Chairs and a limited number of easels are available. Students must provide their own materials. Come as often as you like throughout the year. REGISTRATION IS NOT REQUIRED —just drop in and pay at the door ($12/$10 ACP members). View more information or register.

Extraordinary Mash-Ups

Ilya Genin has a refreshing, provocative take on present day Cuba. Born and raised behind the Iron Curtain, now an American citizen, Genin first learned of Cuba through Soviet messaging. Cuba was a poster child for the common persons’s struggle. Cuba’s accomplishments were, of course, heavily subsidized by the Soviet Union, and Genin viewed these successes through the lens of his own daily life in the Ukraine. Skepticism was an appropriate response.MashUps

The Soviet Union fell, Genin immigrated to the United States, and the island of Cuba became even more isolated. Now, in the United States, the messaging Genin received was quite different. Cuba was a failed pariah. Its struggling economy, lack of modernity, and uncertain prospects held the island residents captive, both physically and spiritually. In America, Cuba was portrayed as a poster child for failed, left wing ideology. Had the pendulum swung back too far in the opposite direction?

Whether or not the Cuban experiment was a success, a third, and comparably self-serving viewpoint further ensnared the media’s attention. Cuba was, and still is, highly photogenic. Visitors find their experience there to be visually ripe with low hanging fruit. Cuba is a time machine, a portal into the past. In Cuba it is still possible to photograph a living culture of not-yet post-modern people.

Lesser photographers latch onto either A, B, or C, above, and join the chorus of their brethren. Theirs is a simplified telling, an opaque veneer resting upon unresolved complexity. We may marvel at the superficial, but difficult questions are neither posed nor addressed. Genin knows that there is both truth and falsehood to be found in each of the three perspectives. He plays them off against one another, triangulating between legend, history, and human experience. Both point and counter-point are expressed in the same image.

Genin uses digital collages to express that Cuba has been the subject of extraordinary mash-ups. These include the collision of African with Spanish culture, Capitalism with Communism, religion with sexual independence, and of necessity with principle. Not to mention the Cuban obsession with their principal oppressor’s sport, baseball.

Cuban culture has inclusively absorbed all of these influences. Cubans have harnessed diverse, sometimes conflicting forces to forge an imperfect union. Genin affirms that Cubans have nothing to apologize for. But Genin’s photographs also show us much more. We see that Cubans are self-aware, scarred, secure, passionate, practical, involved, engaged, acquiescent, loving, and, most of all, human.

Like Cuba itself, Ilya Genin’s vision is complex. It is tinged with darkness as well as with hope.

Ricardo Barros, Curator

Wednesday, April 9

Open Drawing Workshop

-

This is a monitored, non-instructional workshop in which artists can work at their own pace in the medium of their selection (no turpentine-based oil paints, please) from a live model in short and sustained poses. Chairs and a limited number of easels are available. Students must provide their own materials. Come as often as you like throughout the year. REGISTRATION IS NOT REQUIRED —just drop in and pay at the door ($12/$10 ACP members). View more information or register.

Extraordinary Mash-Ups

Ilya Genin has a refreshing, provocative take on present day Cuba. Born and raised behind the Iron Curtain, now an American citizen, Genin first learned of Cuba through Soviet messaging. Cuba was a poster child for the common persons’s struggle. Cuba’s accomplishments were, of course, heavily subsidized by the Soviet Union, and Genin viewed these successes through the lens of his own daily life in the Ukraine. Skepticism was an appropriate response.MashUps

The Soviet Union fell, Genin immigrated to the United States, and the island of Cuba became even more isolated. Now, in the United States, the messaging Genin received was quite different. Cuba was a failed pariah. Its struggling economy, lack of modernity, and uncertain prospects held the island residents captive, both physically and spiritually. In America, Cuba was portrayed as a poster child for failed, left wing ideology. Had the pendulum swung back too far in the opposite direction?

Whether or not the Cuban experiment was a success, a third, and comparably self-serving viewpoint further ensnared the media’s attention. Cuba was, and still is, highly photogenic. Visitors find their experience there to be visually ripe with low hanging fruit. Cuba is a time machine, a portal into the past. In Cuba it is still possible to photograph a living culture of not-yet post-modern people.

Lesser photographers latch onto either A, B, or C, above, and join the chorus of their brethren. Theirs is a simplified telling, an opaque veneer resting upon unresolved complexity. We may marvel at the superficial, but difficult questions are neither posed nor addressed. Genin knows that there is both truth and falsehood to be found in each of the three perspectives. He plays them off against one another, triangulating between legend, history, and human experience. Both point and counter-point are expressed in the same image.

Genin uses digital collages to express that Cuba has been the subject of extraordinary mash-ups. These include the collision of African with Spanish culture, Capitalism with Communism, religion with sexual independence, and of necessity with principle. Not to mention the Cuban obsession with their principal oppressor’s sport, baseball.

Cuban culture has inclusively absorbed all of these influences. Cubans have harnessed diverse, sometimes conflicting forces to forge an imperfect union. Genin affirms that Cubans have nothing to apologize for. But Genin’s photographs also show us much more. We see that Cubans are self-aware, scarred, secure, passionate, practical, involved, engaged, acquiescent, loving, and, most of all, human.

Like Cuba itself, Ilya Genin’s vision is complex. It is tinged with darkness as well as with hope.

Ricardo Barros, Curator

Thursday, April 10

Open Drawing Workshop

-

This is a monitored, non-instructional workshop in which artists can work at their own pace in the medium of their selection (no turpentine-based oil paints, please) from a live model in short and sustained poses. Chairs and a limited number of easels are available. Students must provide their own materials. Come as often as you like throughout the year. REGISTRATION IS NOT REQUIRED —just drop in and pay at the door ($12/$10 ACP members). View more information or register.

Extraordinary Mash-Ups

Ilya Genin has a refreshing, provocative take on present day Cuba. Born and raised behind the Iron Curtain, now an American citizen, Genin first learned of Cuba through Soviet messaging. Cuba was a poster child for the common persons’s struggle. Cuba’s accomplishments were, of course, heavily subsidized by the Soviet Union, and Genin viewed these successes through the lens of his own daily life in the Ukraine. Skepticism was an appropriate response.MashUps

The Soviet Union fell, Genin immigrated to the United States, and the island of Cuba became even more isolated. Now, in the United States, the messaging Genin received was quite different. Cuba was a failed pariah. Its struggling economy, lack of modernity, and uncertain prospects held the island residents captive, both physically and spiritually. In America, Cuba was portrayed as a poster child for failed, left wing ideology. Had the pendulum swung back too far in the opposite direction?

Whether or not the Cuban experiment was a success, a third, and comparably self-serving viewpoint further ensnared the media’s attention. Cuba was, and still is, highly photogenic. Visitors find their experience there to be visually ripe with low hanging fruit. Cuba is a time machine, a portal into the past. In Cuba it is still possible to photograph a living culture of not-yet post-modern people.

Lesser photographers latch onto either A, B, or C, above, and join the chorus of their brethren. Theirs is a simplified telling, an opaque veneer resting upon unresolved complexity. We may marvel at the superficial, but difficult questions are neither posed nor addressed. Genin knows that there is both truth and falsehood to be found in each of the three perspectives. He plays them off against one another, triangulating between legend, history, and human experience. Both point and counter-point are expressed in the same image.

Genin uses digital collages to express that Cuba has been the subject of extraordinary mash-ups. These include the collision of African with Spanish culture, Capitalism with Communism, religion with sexual independence, and of necessity with principle. Not to mention the Cuban obsession with their principal oppressor’s sport, baseball.

Cuban culture has inclusively absorbed all of these influences. Cubans have harnessed diverse, sometimes conflicting forces to forge an imperfect union. Genin affirms that Cubans have nothing to apologize for. But Genin’s photographs also show us much more. We see that Cubans are self-aware, scarred, secure, passionate, practical, involved, engaged, acquiescent, loving, and, most of all, human.

Like Cuba itself, Ilya Genin’s vision is complex. It is tinged with darkness as well as with hope.

Ricardo Barros, Curator

Friday, April 11

Open Drawing Workshop

-

This is a monitored, non-instructional workshop in which artists can work at their own pace in the medium of their selection (no turpentine-based oil paints, please) from a live model in short and sustained poses. Chairs and a limited number of easels are available. Students must provide their own materials. Come as often as you like throughout the year. REGISTRATION IS NOT REQUIRED —just drop in and pay at the door ($12/$10 ACP members). View more information or register.

Extraordinary Mash-Ups

Ilya Genin has a refreshing, provocative take on present day Cuba. Born and raised behind the Iron Curtain, now an American citizen, Genin first learned of Cuba through Soviet messaging. Cuba was a poster child for the common persons’s struggle. Cuba’s accomplishments were, of course, heavily subsidized by the Soviet Union, and Genin viewed these successes through the lens of his own daily life in the Ukraine. Skepticism was an appropriate response.MashUps

The Soviet Union fell, Genin immigrated to the United States, and the island of Cuba became even more isolated. Now, in the United States, the messaging Genin received was quite different. Cuba was a failed pariah. Its struggling economy, lack of modernity, and uncertain prospects held the island residents captive, both physically and spiritually. In America, Cuba was portrayed as a poster child for failed, left wing ideology. Had the pendulum swung back too far in the opposite direction?

Whether or not the Cuban experiment was a success, a third, and comparably self-serving viewpoint further ensnared the media’s attention. Cuba was, and still is, highly photogenic. Visitors find their experience there to be visually ripe with low hanging fruit. Cuba is a time machine, a portal into the past. In Cuba it is still possible to photograph a living culture of not-yet post-modern people.

Lesser photographers latch onto either A, B, or C, above, and join the chorus of their brethren. Theirs is a simplified telling, an opaque veneer resting upon unresolved complexity. We may marvel at the superficial, but difficult questions are neither posed nor addressed. Genin knows that there is both truth and falsehood to be found in each of the three perspectives. He plays them off against one another, triangulating between legend, history, and human experience. Both point and counter-point are expressed in the same image.

Genin uses digital collages to express that Cuba has been the subject of extraordinary mash-ups. These include the collision of African with Spanish culture, Capitalism with Communism, religion with sexual independence, and of necessity with principle. Not to mention the Cuban obsession with their principal oppressor’s sport, baseball.

Cuban culture has inclusively absorbed all of these influences. Cubans have harnessed diverse, sometimes conflicting forces to forge an imperfect union. Genin affirms that Cubans have nothing to apologize for. But Genin’s photographs also show us much more. We see that Cubans are self-aware, scarred, secure, passionate, practical, involved, engaged, acquiescent, loving, and, most of all, human.

Like Cuba itself, Ilya Genin’s vision is complex. It is tinged with darkness as well as with hope.

Ricardo Barros, Curator

Saturday, April 12

Lightweight Felted Scarf

- $65

Participants in this popular workshop will learn felting techniques and make a unique, lightweight scarf using carded wool, carded silk, and silk fabric scraps for surface design. At the end of the session, students will come away with new knowledge of a timeless process and a beautiful scarf! Expect a little bit of physical work and standing on your feet while making felt, but no previous felting experience is necessary. Please bring a bar of soap and an old towel to class. Materials will be supplied by the instructor at an additional cost of $15 per person

View more information or register.

Open Drawing Workshop

-

This is a monitored, non-instructional workshop in which artists can work at their own pace in the medium of their selection (no turpentine-based oil paints, please) from a live model in short and sustained poses. Chairs and a limited number of easels are available. Students must provide their own materials. Come as often as you like throughout the year. REGISTRATION IS NOT REQUIRED —just drop in and pay at the door ($12/$10 ACP members). View more information or register.

Extraordinary Mash-Ups

Ilya Genin has a refreshing, provocative take on present day Cuba. Born and raised behind the Iron Curtain, now an American citizen, Genin first learned of Cuba through Soviet messaging. Cuba was a poster child for the common persons’s struggle. Cuba’s accomplishments were, of course, heavily subsidized by the Soviet Union, and Genin viewed these successes through the lens of his own daily life in the Ukraine. Skepticism was an appropriate response.MashUps

The Soviet Union fell, Genin immigrated to the United States, and the island of Cuba became even more isolated. Now, in the United States, the messaging Genin received was quite different. Cuba was a failed pariah. Its struggling economy, lack of modernity, and uncertain prospects held the island residents captive, both physically and spiritually. In America, Cuba was portrayed as a poster child for failed, left wing ideology. Had the pendulum swung back too far in the opposite direction?

Whether or not the Cuban experiment was a success, a third, and comparably self-serving viewpoint further ensnared the media’s attention. Cuba was, and still is, highly photogenic. Visitors find their experience there to be visually ripe with low hanging fruit. Cuba is a time machine, a portal into the past. In Cuba it is still possible to photograph a living culture of not-yet post-modern people.

Lesser photographers latch onto either A, B, or C, above, and join the chorus of their brethren. Theirs is a simplified telling, an opaque veneer resting upon unresolved complexity. We may marvel at the superficial, but difficult questions are neither posed nor addressed. Genin knows that there is both truth and falsehood to be found in each of the three perspectives. He plays them off against one another, triangulating between legend, history, and human experience. Both point and counter-point are expressed in the same image.

Genin uses digital collages to express that Cuba has been the subject of extraordinary mash-ups. These include the collision of African with Spanish culture, Capitalism with Communism, religion with sexual independence, and of necessity with principle. Not to mention the Cuban obsession with their principal oppressor’s sport, baseball.

Cuban culture has inclusively absorbed all of these influences. Cubans have harnessed diverse, sometimes conflicting forces to forge an imperfect union. Genin affirms that Cubans have nothing to apologize for. But Genin’s photographs also show us much more. We see that Cubans are self-aware, scarred, secure, passionate, practical, involved, engaged, acquiescent, loving, and, most of all, human.

Like Cuba itself, Ilya Genin’s vision is complex. It is tinged with darkness as well as with hope.

Ricardo Barros, Curator