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Saturday, March 24

Handbuilding Nature: Ceramic Workshop with Helena Bienstock

- $95

Learn the handbuilding techniques of ceramic artist Helena Bienstock using direct influences from nature. Students will use clay, decorative slips and step-by-step processes to create their own sculptural piece. Workshop fee includes materials, instruction, and firing.

To register, click here.

Helena Bienstock has been working with clay since the early 1970s, but at the same time has had a long-term teaching career both in Princeton and New York City. She has been active in helping to sustain cultural organizations in New York State and New Jersey, such as the Arts Council of Princeton itself. In appreciation, the clay studio in the Arts Council building is named the Helena Bienstock Clay Studio. Her passion for the environment infuses all her work, bringing together art and social consciousness.

This workshop is held in conjunction with Earth, Fire, Water, Ice, Debris: Five Artists Comment on the Environment, on view in the Arts Council’s award-winning Taplin Gallery March 17 through May 5, 2018

Cafe Impov: A Community Stage Event

- $1 ACP Members, Students, Seniors; $2 General Audience

For the past 25 years, Café Improv has connected beginning and professional performers in the ACP’s Solley Theater. Attendees can expect an evening of exciting local music, poetry, comedy, and more. Café Improv is easily accessible to the public through affordable admission rates and televised broadcasts on Princeton Community Television. Click here to learn more and/or register to play!

This performance is part of the Arts Council of Princeton’s Community Stage Series. Community Stage productions are free (and nearly free) held in collaboration with local artistic groups and organizations. Community Stage programming enable the Arts Council’s Solley Theater to act as an accessible space for community partnerships and high-quality artistic experiences.

Cows in Our Town

Cows in Our Town is an udderly exciting public art collaboration created by the Arts Council of Princeton and McCarter Theatre Center. Twenty one cows were designed by diverse local artists and placed in popular locations around Princeton from December 2017 – February 2018. Learn more here!

The cows have come together to be shown as a group in the Solley Theater lobby in the Paul Robeson Center for the Arts.

[gallery link="file" size="medium" ids="21083,21082,21081,21080,21079,21078,21077,21070,21071,21072,21073,21074,21075,21067,21068,21076,21069"]

[/acp_column]

Earth, Fire, Water, Ice, Debris: Five Artists Comment on the Environment

Fire, Earth, Water, Ice, Debris features original work by Helena Bienstock, Diane Burko, Anita Glesta, Susan Hockaday, Martha Vaughn and is curated by Judith K. Brodsky.

We are in a period of artmaking in which artists have moved out of the attic into the world. In this age of images, artists are using their powerful visual skills to make us aware of the issues in the world around us as well as the beauty. These five artists, each in her own way, have turned their attention to the environment, in some cases using unexpected mediums. Who would think of using clay to mourn the disappearing coral reefs or video to immerse us in a vision of rising sea water? They come from different backgrounds to this point in their careers. – Judy Brodsky

Helena Bienstock has been working with clay since the early 1970s, but at the same time has had a long-term teaching career both in Princeton and New York City. She has been active in helping to sustain cultural organizations in New York State and New Jersey, such as the Arts Council of Princeton itself. In appreciation, the clay studio in the Arts Council building is named the Helena Bienstock Clay Studio. Her passion for the environment infuses all her work, bringing together art and social consciousness.

Martha Vaughn has thousands of photographs archived on her computer. One would think her camera is almost an extension of her body in looking at the photographic record she has made of the natural world in her many travels. In 2014, a book of Vaughn’s photographs, Of Time and Place, was published. Her work is included in the collections of the New Jersey State Museum and Princeton University among other public institutions and in many private collections.

Diane Burko carries on the landscape tradition of the 19th century, but gives it a 21st century perspective. Burko has always painted the extreme landscape, including the world’s largest ice fields—Greenland, Antarctica (twice), Argentina’s Patagonia, Alaska, and the Northern Atlantic just below the Arctic Circle. In the last few years, the works she has been creating have been shown in over 100 exhibitions throughout the country in such venues as the National Academy of Sciences, Washington, DC as well as the more usual venues of art museums and galleries.

Anita Glesta works in sculpture, video, and installation to create settings that engage people with the space around them physically and metaphorically. Her video installation, Watershed, included in this exhibition is a public art project that has been installed previously during the New Museum Ideas City Festival in New York City, and on the surface of the National Theater in London facing the Thames. It also was seen in 2017 in Red Hook, Brooklyn, as an immersive video on the streets of the community to commemorate the fifth anniversary of Hurricane Sandy. She has been a recipient of many grants and awards, among them a New York Foundation of the Arts fellowship, a Puffin Foundation grant, a Pollock/Krasner fellowship, and a New York State Council for the Arts New Media fellowship.

For over 15 years, Susan Hockaday has addressed our experience of nature as we witness its decline through the forces of climate change. She has worked in several mediums, including etching, handmade paper, collage construction, photography and drawing. Hockaday has lived and worked in Holland and England and has lectured in China. In addition, for almost 50 years, she has resided on Cape Breton Island, Nova Scotia, with her family during the summer. The new landscape of detritus has been her focus for the photographs in this exhibition.

“It takes a special kind of artist to transform melting glaciers, rising sea levels, and disappearing coral reefs into stunning visuals that bring both beauty and awareness to our environmental issues,” says artistic director Maria Evans. “We hope that this exhibition can inspire us all to take better care of the world, working to preserve its natural beauty.”

Local Women in their Crowns: A Portraits and Stories Community Project

 

In conjunction with McCarter Theatre Center‘s production of Crowns, directed by Regina Taylor, the Arts Council of Princeton and McCarter have partnered to create Local Women in their Crowns: A Portraits and Stories Community Project.

Inspired by the book of the same name from which Crowns was created, this visual storytelling project captures portraits and the shared stories of Black women of all ages and backgrounds in their church hats. The culminating exhibition serves as a celebration of African American culture and tradition on display at the Arts Council of Princeton, the Princeton Public Library, and the lobbies of McCarter Theatre.
Photography by Bentrice Jusu and S. Bola Okoya.

[caption id="attachment_20736" align="aligncenter" width="300"] This exhibition is being held in collaborations with Migrations, a community-wide investigation of the theme of migration taking place throughout Princeton from February through May, 2018.[/caption]

Recent Small Still Life Paintings





Joe Kossow received a Master in Fine Arts degree from The American University in Washington, DC in 1982. He was fortunate to have studied with Ben Summerford,Robert D’Arista, and Jack Boul. In 1983, he co-founded the Washington Studio School with Lee Newman, Carlton Fletcher, Jack Boul, Susan Yanero, David Holt, Jo Weiss, and Katie Murray. Joe taught at the Washington Studio School and local Washington area colleges for 8 years.

He was awarded the Elizabeth Greenshields prize in 1983. His work has been shown in the DC area, Pennsylvania, and in Paris and Nancy, France. He had a series of solo and group shows throughout the 1980s.

Joe decided that to raise a family the way he wanted to he needed to earn a more substantial income, so he left the art world in 1990. He went back to school where he received a Master in Business Administration from the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania in 1992. He worked in corporate life from then until his retirement in 2016. Joe painted and drew just enough over those years to prevent complete and total rust from setting in.

2017 marked Joe’s return to painting full time. In Joe’s words: “I paint as I did before, only with substantially more patience and maturity.”

Transition: Vietnam

Vietnam is a country in transition. Intrigued by the rapid transformation of Vietnam, one of the fastest growing economies of the world, Mark Ludak and Andrew Cohen have returned multiple times to photograph this region. A dynamic, youthful country, especially seen in mega-cities like Ho Chi Minh City (Sai Gon), it is a country where the traditional and contemporary are reconstituted into distinctively Vietnamese manifestations.

Sunday, March 25

Cows in Our Town

Cows in Our Town is an udderly exciting public art collaboration created by the Arts Council of Princeton and McCarter Theatre Center. Twenty one cows were designed by diverse local artists and placed in popular locations around Princeton from December 2017 – February 2018. Learn more here!

The cows have come together to be shown as a group in the Solley Theater lobby in the Paul Robeson Center for the Arts.

[gallery link="file" size="medium" ids="21083,21082,21081,21080,21079,21078,21077,21070,21071,21072,21073,21074,21075,21067,21068,21076,21069"]

[/acp_column]

Earth, Fire, Water, Ice, Debris: Five Artists Comment on the Environment

Fire, Earth, Water, Ice, Debris features original work by Helena Bienstock, Diane Burko, Anita Glesta, Susan Hockaday, Martha Vaughn and is curated by Judith K. Brodsky.

We are in a period of artmaking in which artists have moved out of the attic into the world. In this age of images, artists are using their powerful visual skills to make us aware of the issues in the world around us as well as the beauty. These five artists, each in her own way, have turned their attention to the environment, in some cases using unexpected mediums. Who would think of using clay to mourn the disappearing coral reefs or video to immerse us in a vision of rising sea water? They come from different backgrounds to this point in their careers. – Judy Brodsky

Helena Bienstock has been working with clay since the early 1970s, but at the same time has had a long-term teaching career both in Princeton and New York City. She has been active in helping to sustain cultural organizations in New York State and New Jersey, such as the Arts Council of Princeton itself. In appreciation, the clay studio in the Arts Council building is named the Helena Bienstock Clay Studio. Her passion for the environment infuses all her work, bringing together art and social consciousness.

Martha Vaughn has thousands of photographs archived on her computer. One would think her camera is almost an extension of her body in looking at the photographic record she has made of the natural world in her many travels. In 2014, a book of Vaughn’s photographs, Of Time and Place, was published. Her work is included in the collections of the New Jersey State Museum and Princeton University among other public institutions and in many private collections.

Diane Burko carries on the landscape tradition of the 19th century, but gives it a 21st century perspective. Burko has always painted the extreme landscape, including the world’s largest ice fields—Greenland, Antarctica (twice), Argentina’s Patagonia, Alaska, and the Northern Atlantic just below the Arctic Circle. In the last few years, the works she has been creating have been shown in over 100 exhibitions throughout the country in such venues as the National Academy of Sciences, Washington, DC as well as the more usual venues of art museums and galleries.

Anita Glesta works in sculpture, video, and installation to create settings that engage people with the space around them physically and metaphorically. Her video installation, Watershed, included in this exhibition is a public art project that has been installed previously during the New Museum Ideas City Festival in New York City, and on the surface of the National Theater in London facing the Thames. It also was seen in 2017 in Red Hook, Brooklyn, as an immersive video on the streets of the community to commemorate the fifth anniversary of Hurricane Sandy. She has been a recipient of many grants and awards, among them a New York Foundation of the Arts fellowship, a Puffin Foundation grant, a Pollock/Krasner fellowship, and a New York State Council for the Arts New Media fellowship.

For over 15 years, Susan Hockaday has addressed our experience of nature as we witness its decline through the forces of climate change. She has worked in several mediums, including etching, handmade paper, collage construction, photography and drawing. Hockaday has lived and worked in Holland and England and has lectured in China. In addition, for almost 50 years, she has resided on Cape Breton Island, Nova Scotia, with her family during the summer. The new landscape of detritus has been her focus for the photographs in this exhibition.

“It takes a special kind of artist to transform melting glaciers, rising sea levels, and disappearing coral reefs into stunning visuals that bring both beauty and awareness to our environmental issues,” says artistic director Maria Evans. “We hope that this exhibition can inspire us all to take better care of the world, working to preserve its natural beauty.”

Local Women in their Crowns: A Portraits and Stories Community Project

 

In conjunction with McCarter Theatre Center‘s production of Crowns, directed by Regina Taylor, the Arts Council of Princeton and McCarter have partnered to create Local Women in their Crowns: A Portraits and Stories Community Project.

Inspired by the book of the same name from which Crowns was created, this visual storytelling project captures portraits and the shared stories of Black women of all ages and backgrounds in their church hats. The culminating exhibition serves as a celebration of African American culture and tradition on display at the Arts Council of Princeton, the Princeton Public Library, and the lobbies of McCarter Theatre.
Photography by Bentrice Jusu and S. Bola Okoya.

[caption id="attachment_20736" align="aligncenter" width="300"] This exhibition is being held in collaborations with Migrations, a community-wide investigation of the theme of migration taking place throughout Princeton from February through May, 2018.[/caption]

Recent Small Still Life Paintings





Joe Kossow received a Master in Fine Arts degree from The American University in Washington, DC in 1982. He was fortunate to have studied with Ben Summerford,Robert D’Arista, and Jack Boul. In 1983, he co-founded the Washington Studio School with Lee Newman, Carlton Fletcher, Jack Boul, Susan Yanero, David Holt, Jo Weiss, and Katie Murray. Joe taught at the Washington Studio School and local Washington area colleges for 8 years.

He was awarded the Elizabeth Greenshields prize in 1983. His work has been shown in the DC area, Pennsylvania, and in Paris and Nancy, France. He had a series of solo and group shows throughout the 1980s.

Joe decided that to raise a family the way he wanted to he needed to earn a more substantial income, so he left the art world in 1990. He went back to school where he received a Master in Business Administration from the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania in 1992. He worked in corporate life from then until his retirement in 2016. Joe painted and drew just enough over those years to prevent complete and total rust from setting in.

2017 marked Joe’s return to painting full time. In Joe’s words: “I paint as I did before, only with substantially more patience and maturity.”

Transition: Vietnam

Vietnam is a country in transition. Intrigued by the rapid transformation of Vietnam, one of the fastest growing economies of the world, Mark Ludak and Andrew Cohen have returned multiple times to photograph this region. A dynamic, youthful country, especially seen in mega-cities like Ho Chi Minh City (Sai Gon), it is a country where the traditional and contemporary are reconstituted into distinctively Vietnamese manifestations.

Monday, March 26

Cows in Our Town

Cows in Our Town is an udderly exciting public art collaboration created by the Arts Council of Princeton and McCarter Theatre Center. Twenty one cows were designed by diverse local artists and placed in popular locations around Princeton from December 2017 – February 2018. Learn more here!

The cows have come together to be shown as a group in the Solley Theater lobby in the Paul Robeson Center for the Arts.

[gallery link="file" size="medium" ids="21083,21082,21081,21080,21079,21078,21077,21070,21071,21072,21073,21074,21075,21067,21068,21076,21069"]

[/acp_column]

Earth, Fire, Water, Ice, Debris: Five Artists Comment on the Environment

Fire, Earth, Water, Ice, Debris features original work by Helena Bienstock, Diane Burko, Anita Glesta, Susan Hockaday, Martha Vaughn and is curated by Judith K. Brodsky.

We are in a period of artmaking in which artists have moved out of the attic into the world. In this age of images, artists are using their powerful visual skills to make us aware of the issues in the world around us as well as the beauty. These five artists, each in her own way, have turned their attention to the environment, in some cases using unexpected mediums. Who would think of using clay to mourn the disappearing coral reefs or video to immerse us in a vision of rising sea water? They come from different backgrounds to this point in their careers. – Judy Brodsky

Helena Bienstock has been working with clay since the early 1970s, but at the same time has had a long-term teaching career both in Princeton and New York City. She has been active in helping to sustain cultural organizations in New York State and New Jersey, such as the Arts Council of Princeton itself. In appreciation, the clay studio in the Arts Council building is named the Helena Bienstock Clay Studio. Her passion for the environment infuses all her work, bringing together art and social consciousness.

Martha Vaughn has thousands of photographs archived on her computer. One would think her camera is almost an extension of her body in looking at the photographic record she has made of the natural world in her many travels. In 2014, a book of Vaughn’s photographs, Of Time and Place, was published. Her work is included in the collections of the New Jersey State Museum and Princeton University among other public institutions and in many private collections.

Diane Burko carries on the landscape tradition of the 19th century, but gives it a 21st century perspective. Burko has always painted the extreme landscape, including the world’s largest ice fields—Greenland, Antarctica (twice), Argentina’s Patagonia, Alaska, and the Northern Atlantic just below the Arctic Circle. In the last few years, the works she has been creating have been shown in over 100 exhibitions throughout the country in such venues as the National Academy of Sciences, Washington, DC as well as the more usual venues of art museums and galleries.

Anita Glesta works in sculpture, video, and installation to create settings that engage people with the space around them physically and metaphorically. Her video installation, Watershed, included in this exhibition is a public art project that has been installed previously during the New Museum Ideas City Festival in New York City, and on the surface of the National Theater in London facing the Thames. It also was seen in 2017 in Red Hook, Brooklyn, as an immersive video on the streets of the community to commemorate the fifth anniversary of Hurricane Sandy. She has been a recipient of many grants and awards, among them a New York Foundation of the Arts fellowship, a Puffin Foundation grant, a Pollock/Krasner fellowship, and a New York State Council for the Arts New Media fellowship.

For over 15 years, Susan Hockaday has addressed our experience of nature as we witness its decline through the forces of climate change. She has worked in several mediums, including etching, handmade paper, collage construction, photography and drawing. Hockaday has lived and worked in Holland and England and has lectured in China. In addition, for almost 50 years, she has resided on Cape Breton Island, Nova Scotia, with her family during the summer. The new landscape of detritus has been her focus for the photographs in this exhibition.

“It takes a special kind of artist to transform melting glaciers, rising sea levels, and disappearing coral reefs into stunning visuals that bring both beauty and awareness to our environmental issues,” says artistic director Maria Evans. “We hope that this exhibition can inspire us all to take better care of the world, working to preserve its natural beauty.”

Local Women in their Crowns: A Portraits and Stories Community Project

 

In conjunction with McCarter Theatre Center‘s production of Crowns, directed by Regina Taylor, the Arts Council of Princeton and McCarter have partnered to create Local Women in their Crowns: A Portraits and Stories Community Project.

Inspired by the book of the same name from which Crowns was created, this visual storytelling project captures portraits and the shared stories of Black women of all ages and backgrounds in their church hats. The culminating exhibition serves as a celebration of African American culture and tradition on display at the Arts Council of Princeton, the Princeton Public Library, and the lobbies of McCarter Theatre.
Photography by Bentrice Jusu and S. Bola Okoya.

[caption id="attachment_20736" align="aligncenter" width="300"] This exhibition is being held in collaborations with Migrations, a community-wide investigation of the theme of migration taking place throughout Princeton from February through May, 2018.[/caption]

Transition: Vietnam

Vietnam is a country in transition. Intrigued by the rapid transformation of Vietnam, one of the fastest growing economies of the world, Mark Ludak and Andrew Cohen have returned multiple times to photograph this region. A dynamic, youthful country, especially seen in mega-cities like Ho Chi Minh City (Sai Gon), it is a country where the traditional and contemporary are reconstituted into distinctively Vietnamese manifestations.

Tuesday, March 27

Cows in Our Town

Cows in Our Town is an udderly exciting public art collaboration created by the Arts Council of Princeton and McCarter Theatre Center. Twenty one cows were designed by diverse local artists and placed in popular locations around Princeton from December 2017 – February 2018. Learn more here!

The cows have come together to be shown as a group in the Solley Theater lobby in the Paul Robeson Center for the Arts.

[gallery link="file" size="medium" ids="21083,21082,21081,21080,21079,21078,21077,21070,21071,21072,21073,21074,21075,21067,21068,21076,21069"]

[/acp_column]

Earth, Fire, Water, Ice, Debris: Five Artists Comment on the Environment

Fire, Earth, Water, Ice, Debris features original work by Helena Bienstock, Diane Burko, Anita Glesta, Susan Hockaday, Martha Vaughn and is curated by Judith K. Brodsky.

We are in a period of artmaking in which artists have moved out of the attic into the world. In this age of images, artists are using their powerful visual skills to make us aware of the issues in the world around us as well as the beauty. These five artists, each in her own way, have turned their attention to the environment, in some cases using unexpected mediums. Who would think of using clay to mourn the disappearing coral reefs or video to immerse us in a vision of rising sea water? They come from different backgrounds to this point in their careers. – Judy Brodsky

Helena Bienstock has been working with clay since the early 1970s, but at the same time has had a long-term teaching career both in Princeton and New York City. She has been active in helping to sustain cultural organizations in New York State and New Jersey, such as the Arts Council of Princeton itself. In appreciation, the clay studio in the Arts Council building is named the Helena Bienstock Clay Studio. Her passion for the environment infuses all her work, bringing together art and social consciousness.

Martha Vaughn has thousands of photographs archived on her computer. One would think her camera is almost an extension of her body in looking at the photographic record she has made of the natural world in her many travels. In 2014, a book of Vaughn’s photographs, Of Time and Place, was published. Her work is included in the collections of the New Jersey State Museum and Princeton University among other public institutions and in many private collections.

Diane Burko carries on the landscape tradition of the 19th century, but gives it a 21st century perspective. Burko has always painted the extreme landscape, including the world’s largest ice fields—Greenland, Antarctica (twice), Argentina’s Patagonia, Alaska, and the Northern Atlantic just below the Arctic Circle. In the last few years, the works she has been creating have been shown in over 100 exhibitions throughout the country in such venues as the National Academy of Sciences, Washington, DC as well as the more usual venues of art museums and galleries.

Anita Glesta works in sculpture, video, and installation to create settings that engage people with the space around them physically and metaphorically. Her video installation, Watershed, included in this exhibition is a public art project that has been installed previously during the New Museum Ideas City Festival in New York City, and on the surface of the National Theater in London facing the Thames. It also was seen in 2017 in Red Hook, Brooklyn, as an immersive video on the streets of the community to commemorate the fifth anniversary of Hurricane Sandy. She has been a recipient of many grants and awards, among them a New York Foundation of the Arts fellowship, a Puffin Foundation grant, a Pollock/Krasner fellowship, and a New York State Council for the Arts New Media fellowship.

For over 15 years, Susan Hockaday has addressed our experience of nature as we witness its decline through the forces of climate change. She has worked in several mediums, including etching, handmade paper, collage construction, photography and drawing. Hockaday has lived and worked in Holland and England and has lectured in China. In addition, for almost 50 years, she has resided on Cape Breton Island, Nova Scotia, with her family during the summer. The new landscape of detritus has been her focus for the photographs in this exhibition.

“It takes a special kind of artist to transform melting glaciers, rising sea levels, and disappearing coral reefs into stunning visuals that bring both beauty and awareness to our environmental issues,” says artistic director Maria Evans. “We hope that this exhibition can inspire us all to take better care of the world, working to preserve its natural beauty.”

Local Women in their Crowns: A Portraits and Stories Community Project

 

In conjunction with McCarter Theatre Center‘s production of Crowns, directed by Regina Taylor, the Arts Council of Princeton and McCarter have partnered to create Local Women in their Crowns: A Portraits and Stories Community Project.

Inspired by the book of the same name from which Crowns was created, this visual storytelling project captures portraits and the shared stories of Black women of all ages and backgrounds in their church hats. The culminating exhibition serves as a celebration of African American culture and tradition on display at the Arts Council of Princeton, the Princeton Public Library, and the lobbies of McCarter Theatre.
Photography by Bentrice Jusu and S. Bola Okoya.

[caption id="attachment_20736" align="aligncenter" width="300"] This exhibition is being held in collaborations with Migrations, a community-wide investigation of the theme of migration taking place throughout Princeton from February through May, 2018.[/caption]

Transition: Vietnam

Vietnam is a country in transition. Intrigued by the rapid transformation of Vietnam, one of the fastest growing economies of the world, Mark Ludak and Andrew Cohen have returned multiple times to photograph this region. A dynamic, youthful country, especially seen in mega-cities like Ho Chi Minh City (Sai Gon), it is a country where the traditional and contemporary are reconstituted into distinctively Vietnamese manifestations.

Wednesday, March 28

Cows in Our Town

Cows in Our Town is an udderly exciting public art collaboration created by the Arts Council of Princeton and McCarter Theatre Center. Twenty one cows were designed by diverse local artists and placed in popular locations around Princeton from December 2017 – February 2018. Learn more here!

The cows have come together to be shown as a group in the Solley Theater lobby in the Paul Robeson Center for the Arts.

[gallery link="file" size="medium" ids="21083,21082,21081,21080,21079,21078,21077,21070,21071,21072,21073,21074,21075,21067,21068,21076,21069"]

[/acp_column]

Earth, Fire, Water, Ice, Debris: Five Artists Comment on the Environment

Fire, Earth, Water, Ice, Debris features original work by Helena Bienstock, Diane Burko, Anita Glesta, Susan Hockaday, Martha Vaughn and is curated by Judith K. Brodsky.

We are in a period of artmaking in which artists have moved out of the attic into the world. In this age of images, artists are using their powerful visual skills to make us aware of the issues in the world around us as well as the beauty. These five artists, each in her own way, have turned their attention to the environment, in some cases using unexpected mediums. Who would think of using clay to mourn the disappearing coral reefs or video to immerse us in a vision of rising sea water? They come from different backgrounds to this point in their careers. – Judy Brodsky

Helena Bienstock has been working with clay since the early 1970s, but at the same time has had a long-term teaching career both in Princeton and New York City. She has been active in helping to sustain cultural organizations in New York State and New Jersey, such as the Arts Council of Princeton itself. In appreciation, the clay studio in the Arts Council building is named the Helena Bienstock Clay Studio. Her passion for the environment infuses all her work, bringing together art and social consciousness.

Martha Vaughn has thousands of photographs archived on her computer. One would think her camera is almost an extension of her body in looking at the photographic record she has made of the natural world in her many travels. In 2014, a book of Vaughn’s photographs, Of Time and Place, was published. Her work is included in the collections of the New Jersey State Museum and Princeton University among other public institutions and in many private collections.

Diane Burko carries on the landscape tradition of the 19th century, but gives it a 21st century perspective. Burko has always painted the extreme landscape, including the world’s largest ice fields—Greenland, Antarctica (twice), Argentina’s Patagonia, Alaska, and the Northern Atlantic just below the Arctic Circle. In the last few years, the works she has been creating have been shown in over 100 exhibitions throughout the country in such venues as the National Academy of Sciences, Washington, DC as well as the more usual venues of art museums and galleries.

Anita Glesta works in sculpture, video, and installation to create settings that engage people with the space around them physically and metaphorically. Her video installation, Watershed, included in this exhibition is a public art project that has been installed previously during the New Museum Ideas City Festival in New York City, and on the surface of the National Theater in London facing the Thames. It also was seen in 2017 in Red Hook, Brooklyn, as an immersive video on the streets of the community to commemorate the fifth anniversary of Hurricane Sandy. She has been a recipient of many grants and awards, among them a New York Foundation of the Arts fellowship, a Puffin Foundation grant, a Pollock/Krasner fellowship, and a New York State Council for the Arts New Media fellowship.

For over 15 years, Susan Hockaday has addressed our experience of nature as we witness its decline through the forces of climate change. She has worked in several mediums, including etching, handmade paper, collage construction, photography and drawing. Hockaday has lived and worked in Holland and England and has lectured in China. In addition, for almost 50 years, she has resided on Cape Breton Island, Nova Scotia, with her family during the summer. The new landscape of detritus has been her focus for the photographs in this exhibition.

“It takes a special kind of artist to transform melting glaciers, rising sea levels, and disappearing coral reefs into stunning visuals that bring both beauty and awareness to our environmental issues,” says artistic director Maria Evans. “We hope that this exhibition can inspire us all to take better care of the world, working to preserve its natural beauty.”

Local Women in their Crowns: A Portraits and Stories Community Project

 

In conjunction with McCarter Theatre Center‘s production of Crowns, directed by Regina Taylor, the Arts Council of Princeton and McCarter have partnered to create Local Women in their Crowns: A Portraits and Stories Community Project.

Inspired by the book of the same name from which Crowns was created, this visual storytelling project captures portraits and the shared stories of Black women of all ages and backgrounds in their church hats. The culminating exhibition serves as a celebration of African American culture and tradition on display at the Arts Council of Princeton, the Princeton Public Library, and the lobbies of McCarter Theatre.
Photography by Bentrice Jusu and S. Bola Okoya.

[caption id="attachment_20736" align="aligncenter" width="300"] This exhibition is being held in collaborations with Migrations, a community-wide investigation of the theme of migration taking place throughout Princeton from February through May, 2018.[/caption]

Transition: Vietnam

Vietnam is a country in transition. Intrigued by the rapid transformation of Vietnam, one of the fastest growing economies of the world, Mark Ludak and Andrew Cohen have returned multiple times to photograph this region. A dynamic, youthful country, especially seen in mega-cities like Ho Chi Minh City (Sai Gon), it is a country where the traditional and contemporary are reconstituted into distinctively Vietnamese manifestations.

Thursday, March 29

Cows in Our Town

Cows in Our Town is an udderly exciting public art collaboration created by the Arts Council of Princeton and McCarter Theatre Center. Twenty one cows were designed by diverse local artists and placed in popular locations around Princeton from December 2017 – February 2018. Learn more here!

The cows have come together to be shown as a group in the Solley Theater lobby in the Paul Robeson Center for the Arts.

[gallery link="file" size="medium" ids="21083,21082,21081,21080,21079,21078,21077,21070,21071,21072,21073,21074,21075,21067,21068,21076,21069"]

[/acp_column]

Earth, Fire, Water, Ice, Debris: Five Artists Comment on the Environment

Fire, Earth, Water, Ice, Debris features original work by Helena Bienstock, Diane Burko, Anita Glesta, Susan Hockaday, Martha Vaughn and is curated by Judith K. Brodsky.

We are in a period of artmaking in which artists have moved out of the attic into the world. In this age of images, artists are using their powerful visual skills to make us aware of the issues in the world around us as well as the beauty. These five artists, each in her own way, have turned their attention to the environment, in some cases using unexpected mediums. Who would think of using clay to mourn the disappearing coral reefs or video to immerse us in a vision of rising sea water? They come from different backgrounds to this point in their careers. – Judy Brodsky

Helena Bienstock has been working with clay since the early 1970s, but at the same time has had a long-term teaching career both in Princeton and New York City. She has been active in helping to sustain cultural organizations in New York State and New Jersey, such as the Arts Council of Princeton itself. In appreciation, the clay studio in the Arts Council building is named the Helena Bienstock Clay Studio. Her passion for the environment infuses all her work, bringing together art and social consciousness.

Martha Vaughn has thousands of photographs archived on her computer. One would think her camera is almost an extension of her body in looking at the photographic record she has made of the natural world in her many travels. In 2014, a book of Vaughn’s photographs, Of Time and Place, was published. Her work is included in the collections of the New Jersey State Museum and Princeton University among other public institutions and in many private collections.

Diane Burko carries on the landscape tradition of the 19th century, but gives it a 21st century perspective. Burko has always painted the extreme landscape, including the world’s largest ice fields—Greenland, Antarctica (twice), Argentina’s Patagonia, Alaska, and the Northern Atlantic just below the Arctic Circle. In the last few years, the works she has been creating have been shown in over 100 exhibitions throughout the country in such venues as the National Academy of Sciences, Washington, DC as well as the more usual venues of art museums and galleries.

Anita Glesta works in sculpture, video, and installation to create settings that engage people with the space around them physically and metaphorically. Her video installation, Watershed, included in this exhibition is a public art project that has been installed previously during the New Museum Ideas City Festival in New York City, and on the surface of the National Theater in London facing the Thames. It also was seen in 2017 in Red Hook, Brooklyn, as an immersive video on the streets of the community to commemorate the fifth anniversary of Hurricane Sandy. She has been a recipient of many grants and awards, among them a New York Foundation of the Arts fellowship, a Puffin Foundation grant, a Pollock/Krasner fellowship, and a New York State Council for the Arts New Media fellowship.

For over 15 years, Susan Hockaday has addressed our experience of nature as we witness its decline through the forces of climate change. She has worked in several mediums, including etching, handmade paper, collage construction, photography and drawing. Hockaday has lived and worked in Holland and England and has lectured in China. In addition, for almost 50 years, she has resided on Cape Breton Island, Nova Scotia, with her family during the summer. The new landscape of detritus has been her focus for the photographs in this exhibition.

“It takes a special kind of artist to transform melting glaciers, rising sea levels, and disappearing coral reefs into stunning visuals that bring both beauty and awareness to our environmental issues,” says artistic director Maria Evans. “We hope that this exhibition can inspire us all to take better care of the world, working to preserve its natural beauty.”

Local Women in their Crowns: A Portraits and Stories Community Project

 

In conjunction with McCarter Theatre Center‘s production of Crowns, directed by Regina Taylor, the Arts Council of Princeton and McCarter have partnered to create Local Women in their Crowns: A Portraits and Stories Community Project.

Inspired by the book of the same name from which Crowns was created, this visual storytelling project captures portraits and the shared stories of Black women of all ages and backgrounds in their church hats. The culminating exhibition serves as a celebration of African American culture and tradition on display at the Arts Council of Princeton, the Princeton Public Library, and the lobbies of McCarter Theatre.
Photography by Bentrice Jusu and S. Bola Okoya.

[caption id="attachment_20736" align="aligncenter" width="300"] This exhibition is being held in collaborations with Migrations, a community-wide investigation of the theme of migration taking place throughout Princeton from February through May, 2018.[/caption]

Transition: Vietnam

Vietnam is a country in transition. Intrigued by the rapid transformation of Vietnam, one of the fastest growing economies of the world, Mark Ludak and Andrew Cohen have returned multiple times to photograph this region. A dynamic, youthful country, especially seen in mega-cities like Ho Chi Minh City (Sai Gon), it is a country where the traditional and contemporary are reconstituted into distinctively Vietnamese manifestations.

Friday, March 30

Cows in Our Town

Cows in Our Town is an udderly exciting public art collaboration created by the Arts Council of Princeton and McCarter Theatre Center. Twenty one cows were designed by diverse local artists and placed in popular locations around Princeton from December 2017 – February 2018. Learn more here!

The cows have come together to be shown as a group in the Solley Theater lobby in the Paul Robeson Center for the Arts.

[gallery link="file" size="medium" ids="21083,21082,21081,21080,21079,21078,21077,21070,21071,21072,21073,21074,21075,21067,21068,21076,21069"]

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Earth, Fire, Water, Ice, Debris: Five Artists Comment on the Environment

Fire, Earth, Water, Ice, Debris features original work by Helena Bienstock, Diane Burko, Anita Glesta, Susan Hockaday, Martha Vaughn and is curated by Judith K. Brodsky.

We are in a period of artmaking in which artists have moved out of the attic into the world. In this age of images, artists are using their powerful visual skills to make us aware of the issues in the world around us as well as the beauty. These five artists, each in her own way, have turned their attention to the environment, in some cases using unexpected mediums. Who would think of using clay to mourn the disappearing coral reefs or video to immerse us in a vision of rising sea water? They come from different backgrounds to this point in their careers. – Judy Brodsky

Helena Bienstock has been working with clay since the early 1970s, but at the same time has had a long-term teaching career both in Princeton and New York City. She has been active in helping to sustain cultural organizations in New York State and New Jersey, such as the Arts Council of Princeton itself. In appreciation, the clay studio in the Arts Council building is named the Helena Bienstock Clay Studio. Her passion for the environment infuses all her work, bringing together art and social consciousness.

Martha Vaughn has thousands of photographs archived on her computer. One would think her camera is almost an extension of her body in looking at the photographic record she has made of the natural world in her many travels. In 2014, a book of Vaughn’s photographs, Of Time and Place, was published. Her work is included in the collections of the New Jersey State Museum and Princeton University among other public institutions and in many private collections.

Diane Burko carries on the landscape tradition of the 19th century, but gives it a 21st century perspective. Burko has always painted the extreme landscape, including the world’s largest ice fields—Greenland, Antarctica (twice), Argentina’s Patagonia, Alaska, and the Northern Atlantic just below the Arctic Circle. In the last few years, the works she has been creating have been shown in over 100 exhibitions throughout the country in such venues as the National Academy of Sciences, Washington, DC as well as the more usual venues of art museums and galleries.

Anita Glesta works in sculpture, video, and installation to create settings that engage people with the space around them physically and metaphorically. Her video installation, Watershed, included in this exhibition is a public art project that has been installed previously during the New Museum Ideas City Festival in New York City, and on the surface of the National Theater in London facing the Thames. It also was seen in 2017 in Red Hook, Brooklyn, as an immersive video on the streets of the community to commemorate the fifth anniversary of Hurricane Sandy. She has been a recipient of many grants and awards, among them a New York Foundation of the Arts fellowship, a Puffin Foundation grant, a Pollock/Krasner fellowship, and a New York State Council for the Arts New Media fellowship.

For over 15 years, Susan Hockaday has addressed our experience of nature as we witness its decline through the forces of climate change. She has worked in several mediums, including etching, handmade paper, collage construction, photography and drawing. Hockaday has lived and worked in Holland and England and has lectured in China. In addition, for almost 50 years, she has resided on Cape Breton Island, Nova Scotia, with her family during the summer. The new landscape of detritus has been her focus for the photographs in this exhibition.

“It takes a special kind of artist to transform melting glaciers, rising sea levels, and disappearing coral reefs into stunning visuals that bring both beauty and awareness to our environmental issues,” says artistic director Maria Evans. “We hope that this exhibition can inspire us all to take better care of the world, working to preserve its natural beauty.”

Local Women in their Crowns: A Portraits and Stories Community Project

 

In conjunction with McCarter Theatre Center‘s production of Crowns, directed by Regina Taylor, the Arts Council of Princeton and McCarter have partnered to create Local Women in their Crowns: A Portraits and Stories Community Project.

Inspired by the book of the same name from which Crowns was created, this visual storytelling project captures portraits and the shared stories of Black women of all ages and backgrounds in their church hats. The culminating exhibition serves as a celebration of African American culture and tradition on display at the Arts Council of Princeton, the Princeton Public Library, and the lobbies of McCarter Theatre.
Photography by Bentrice Jusu and S. Bola Okoya.

[caption id="attachment_20736" align="aligncenter" width="300"] This exhibition is being held in collaborations with Migrations, a community-wide investigation of the theme of migration taking place throughout Princeton from February through May, 2018.[/caption]

Transition: Vietnam

Vietnam is a country in transition. Intrigued by the rapid transformation of Vietnam, one of the fastest growing economies of the world, Mark Ludak and Andrew Cohen have returned multiple times to photograph this region. A dynamic, youthful country, especially seen in mega-cities like Ho Chi Minh City (Sai Gon), it is a country where the traditional and contemporary are reconstituted into distinctively Vietnamese manifestations.