• Events & Performances
  • Exhibitions
  • Workshops
  • Community
  • Community Stage

Wednesday, April 18

Climate Cabaret: A Community Stage Event

- Free and Open to the Public!

In Climate Cabaret, theater and music combine to find comedy, poignancy and beauty in the greatest challenge of our time: our relationship to Earth. A stubbornly abstract subject is brought home to our bodies and our hearts. Molecules become characters; carbon becomes a seductive renaissance atom with issues. Witness a man’s tragicomic breakup with his car. Mock drug ads for Lyatol and Gasoline list troubling side-effects. Classic songs are “climate-adapted” to speak of human folly and love for a planet. Witness this unique, Princeton-born production, featuring veteran performers and writer/composer Stephen Hiltner.

This performance is part of the Arts Council of Princeton’s Community Stage Series. Community Stage productions are free (and nearly free) held in collaboration with local artistic groups and organizations. Community Stage programming enable the Arts Council’s Solley Theater to act as an accessible space for community partnerships and high-quality artistic experiences.

Program is free, but advance registration is recommended. Priority will be given to those who have registered in advance.Register for free on Eventbrite.

Earth, Fire, Water, Ice, Debris: Five Artists Comment on the Environment

Fire, Earth, Water, Ice, Debris features original work by Helena Bienstock, Diane Burko, Anita Glesta, Susan Hockaday, Martha Vaughn and is curated by Judith K. Brodsky.

We are in a period of artmaking in which artists have moved out of the attic into the world. In this age of images, artists are using their powerful visual skills to make us aware of the issues in the world around us as well as the beauty. These five artists, each in her own way, have turned their attention to the environment, in some cases using unexpected mediums. Who would think of using clay to mourn the disappearing coral reefs or video to immerse us in a vision of rising sea water? They come from different backgrounds to this point in their careers. – Judy Brodsky

Helena Bienstock has been working with clay since the early 1970s, but at the same time has had a long-term teaching career both in Princeton and New York City. She has been active in helping to sustain cultural organizations in New York State and New Jersey, such as the Arts Council of Princeton itself. In appreciation, the clay studio in the Arts Council building is named the Helena Bienstock Clay Studio. Her passion for the environment infuses all her work, bringing together art and social consciousness.

Martha Vaughn has thousands of photographs archived on her computer. One would think her camera is almost an extension of her body in looking at the photographic record she has made of the natural world in her many travels. In 2014, a book of Vaughn’s photographs, Of Time and Place, was published. Her work is included in the collections of the New Jersey State Museum and Princeton University among other public institutions and in many private collections.

Diane Burko carries on the landscape tradition of the 19th century, but gives it a 21st century perspective. Burko has always painted the extreme landscape, including the world’s largest ice fields—Greenland, Antarctica (twice), Argentina’s Patagonia, Alaska, and the Northern Atlantic just below the Arctic Circle. In the last few years, the works she has been creating have been shown in over 100 exhibitions throughout the country in such venues as the National Academy of Sciences, Washington, DC as well as the more usual venues of art museums and galleries.

Anita Glesta works in sculpture, video, and installation to create settings that engage people with the space around them physically and metaphorically. Her video installation, Watershed, included in this exhibition is a public art project that has been installed previously during the New Museum Ideas City Festival in New York City, and on the surface of the National Theater in London facing the Thames. It also was seen in 2017 in Red Hook, Brooklyn, as an immersive video on the streets of the community to commemorate the fifth anniversary of Hurricane Sandy. She has been a recipient of many grants and awards, among them a New York Foundation of the Arts fellowship, a Puffin Foundation grant, a Pollock/Krasner fellowship, and a New York State Council for the Arts New Media fellowship.

For over 15 years, Susan Hockaday has addressed our experience of nature as we witness its decline through the forces of climate change. She has worked in several mediums, including etching, handmade paper, collage construction, photography and drawing. Hockaday has lived and worked in Holland and England and has lectured in China. In addition, for almost 50 years, she has resided on Cape Breton Island, Nova Scotia, with her family during the summer. The new landscape of detritus has been her focus for the photographs in this exhibition.

“It takes a special kind of artist to transform melting glaciers, rising sea levels, and disappearing coral reefs into stunning visuals that bring both beauty and awareness to our environmental issues,” says artistic director Maria Evans. “We hope that this exhibition can inspire us all to take better care of the world, working to preserve its natural beauty.”

I am Innocent: The Migration Back to Freedom for the Innocent in Prison

For the thousands of wrongfully-convicted men and women in this country, their journey starts with a tremendous shock. They are arrested for a serious crime they had nothing to do with. They ultimately wind up in court and despite all evidence to the contrary, they believe it is only a matter of time before police, prosecutors and the judge will realize their mistake. But that never happens. They are locked away with little chance of ever seeing freedom again while living in the hell of maximum security prisons, surrounded by murderers, rapists, and disinterested prison guards. But they must find a way to adapt as this is where they will live for years and years before someone will hear their cries for justice.

Meanwhile, life on the outside goes on without them. They miss countless graduations, birthdays, deaths, and other pivotal moments. Years later for the few who are able to migrate back home after navigating a hostile criminal justice system, they will find that freedom is very different, almost foreign.

This is another difficult journey: they’re back home and in society, but nothing is the same. And again, they must find a way to adapt and live.

The photos and stories in this exhibit will convey the physical and emotional upheaval associated with losing and re-gaining lost freedom and family. For all of the Centurion exonorees, they also find family in the brothers and sisters who have taken the same journey to freedom.

Sixty-one innocent men and women have been freed by Centurion, the first innocence organization, founded in Princeton in 1980.

As this exhibit illustrates: this could happen to anyone.

Local Women in their Crowns: A Portraits and Stories Community Project

 

In conjunction with McCarter Theatre Center‘s production of Crowns, directed by Regina Taylor, the Arts Council of Princeton and McCarter have partnered to create Local Women in their Crowns: A Portraits and Stories Community Project.

Inspired by the book of the same name from which Crowns was created, this visual storytelling project captures portraits and the shared stories of Black women of all ages and backgrounds in their church hats. The culminating exhibition serves as a celebration of African American culture and tradition on display at the Arts Council of Princeton, the Princeton Public Library, and the lobbies of McCarter Theatre.
Photography by Bentrice Jusu and S. Bola Okoya.

[caption id="attachment_20736" align="aligncenter" width="300"] This exhibition is being held in collaborations with Migrations, a community-wide investigation of the theme of migration taking place throughout Princeton from February through May, 2018.[/caption]

Thursday, April 19

Stretto Youth Chamber Orchestra of Great Princeton: Community Stage Event

- Free and Open to the Public!

Stretto Youth Chamber Orchestra is first and foremost a team of music lovers who participate in learning and teaching together in an immersion based music learning program. Young musicians come together to tackle the challenge of playing great works of the chamber orchestra literature. This event will feature the Advanced Ensemble and Quartet. Stretto has performed in Chicago, Paris, Prague, Brussels, Shanghai, Beijing, Germany, Italy, Austria, Montenegro, Serbia, Croatia and Bulgaria, and as a featured guest performing ensemble at the Philadelphia Bach Festival, New York Encounter (New York, NY) and the Princeton Early Music Festival.

This performance is part of the Arts Council of Princeton’s Community Stage Series. Community Stage productions are free (and nearly free) held in collaboration with local artistic groups and organizations. Community Stage programming enable the Arts Council’s Solley Theater to act as an accessible space for community partnerships and high-quality artistic experiences.

Program is free, but advance registration is recommended. Priority will be given to those who have registered in advance. Click here to reserve your seat for this performance on Eventbrite.

Earth, Fire, Water, Ice, Debris: Five Artists Comment on the Environment

Fire, Earth, Water, Ice, Debris features original work by Helena Bienstock, Diane Burko, Anita Glesta, Susan Hockaday, Martha Vaughn and is curated by Judith K. Brodsky.

We are in a period of artmaking in which artists have moved out of the attic into the world. In this age of images, artists are using their powerful visual skills to make us aware of the issues in the world around us as well as the beauty. These five artists, each in her own way, have turned their attention to the environment, in some cases using unexpected mediums. Who would think of using clay to mourn the disappearing coral reefs or video to immerse us in a vision of rising sea water? They come from different backgrounds to this point in their careers. – Judy Brodsky

Helena Bienstock has been working with clay since the early 1970s, but at the same time has had a long-term teaching career both in Princeton and New York City. She has been active in helping to sustain cultural organizations in New York State and New Jersey, such as the Arts Council of Princeton itself. In appreciation, the clay studio in the Arts Council building is named the Helena Bienstock Clay Studio. Her passion for the environment infuses all her work, bringing together art and social consciousness.

Martha Vaughn has thousands of photographs archived on her computer. One would think her camera is almost an extension of her body in looking at the photographic record she has made of the natural world in her many travels. In 2014, a book of Vaughn’s photographs, Of Time and Place, was published. Her work is included in the collections of the New Jersey State Museum and Princeton University among other public institutions and in many private collections.

Diane Burko carries on the landscape tradition of the 19th century, but gives it a 21st century perspective. Burko has always painted the extreme landscape, including the world’s largest ice fields—Greenland, Antarctica (twice), Argentina’s Patagonia, Alaska, and the Northern Atlantic just below the Arctic Circle. In the last few years, the works she has been creating have been shown in over 100 exhibitions throughout the country in such venues as the National Academy of Sciences, Washington, DC as well as the more usual venues of art museums and galleries.

Anita Glesta works in sculpture, video, and installation to create settings that engage people with the space around them physically and metaphorically. Her video installation, Watershed, included in this exhibition is a public art project that has been installed previously during the New Museum Ideas City Festival in New York City, and on the surface of the National Theater in London facing the Thames. It also was seen in 2017 in Red Hook, Brooklyn, as an immersive video on the streets of the community to commemorate the fifth anniversary of Hurricane Sandy. She has been a recipient of many grants and awards, among them a New York Foundation of the Arts fellowship, a Puffin Foundation grant, a Pollock/Krasner fellowship, and a New York State Council for the Arts New Media fellowship.

For over 15 years, Susan Hockaday has addressed our experience of nature as we witness its decline through the forces of climate change. She has worked in several mediums, including etching, handmade paper, collage construction, photography and drawing. Hockaday has lived and worked in Holland and England and has lectured in China. In addition, for almost 50 years, she has resided on Cape Breton Island, Nova Scotia, with her family during the summer. The new landscape of detritus has been her focus for the photographs in this exhibition.

“It takes a special kind of artist to transform melting glaciers, rising sea levels, and disappearing coral reefs into stunning visuals that bring both beauty and awareness to our environmental issues,” says artistic director Maria Evans. “We hope that this exhibition can inspire us all to take better care of the world, working to preserve its natural beauty.”

I am Innocent: The Migration Back to Freedom for the Innocent in Prison

For the thousands of wrongfully-convicted men and women in this country, their journey starts with a tremendous shock. They are arrested for a serious crime they had nothing to do with. They ultimately wind up in court and despite all evidence to the contrary, they believe it is only a matter of time before police, prosecutors and the judge will realize their mistake. But that never happens. They are locked away with little chance of ever seeing freedom again while living in the hell of maximum security prisons, surrounded by murderers, rapists, and disinterested prison guards. But they must find a way to adapt as this is where they will live for years and years before someone will hear their cries for justice.

Meanwhile, life on the outside goes on without them. They miss countless graduations, birthdays, deaths, and other pivotal moments. Years later for the few who are able to migrate back home after navigating a hostile criminal justice system, they will find that freedom is very different, almost foreign.

This is another difficult journey: they’re back home and in society, but nothing is the same. And again, they must find a way to adapt and live.

The photos and stories in this exhibit will convey the physical and emotional upheaval associated with losing and re-gaining lost freedom and family. For all of the Centurion exonorees, they also find family in the brothers and sisters who have taken the same journey to freedom.

Sixty-one innocent men and women have been freed by Centurion, the first innocence organization, founded in Princeton in 1980.

As this exhibit illustrates: this could happen to anyone.

Local Women in their Crowns: A Portraits and Stories Community Project

 

In conjunction with McCarter Theatre Center‘s production of Crowns, directed by Regina Taylor, the Arts Council of Princeton and McCarter have partnered to create Local Women in their Crowns: A Portraits and Stories Community Project.

Inspired by the book of the same name from which Crowns was created, this visual storytelling project captures portraits and the shared stories of Black women of all ages and backgrounds in their church hats. The culminating exhibition serves as a celebration of African American culture and tradition on display at the Arts Council of Princeton, the Princeton Public Library, and the lobbies of McCarter Theatre.
Photography by Bentrice Jusu and S. Bola Okoya.

[caption id="attachment_20736" align="aligncenter" width="300"] This exhibition is being held in collaborations with Migrations, a community-wide investigation of the theme of migration taking place throughout Princeton from February through May, 2018.[/caption]

Friday, April 20

Earth, Fire, Water, Ice, Debris: Five Artists Comment on the Environment

Fire, Earth, Water, Ice, Debris features original work by Helena Bienstock, Diane Burko, Anita Glesta, Susan Hockaday, Martha Vaughn and is curated by Judith K. Brodsky.

We are in a period of artmaking in which artists have moved out of the attic into the world. In this age of images, artists are using their powerful visual skills to make us aware of the issues in the world around us as well as the beauty. These five artists, each in her own way, have turned their attention to the environment, in some cases using unexpected mediums. Who would think of using clay to mourn the disappearing coral reefs or video to immerse us in a vision of rising sea water? They come from different backgrounds to this point in their careers. – Judy Brodsky

Helena Bienstock has been working with clay since the early 1970s, but at the same time has had a long-term teaching career both in Princeton and New York City. She has been active in helping to sustain cultural organizations in New York State and New Jersey, such as the Arts Council of Princeton itself. In appreciation, the clay studio in the Arts Council building is named the Helena Bienstock Clay Studio. Her passion for the environment infuses all her work, bringing together art and social consciousness.

Martha Vaughn has thousands of photographs archived on her computer. One would think her camera is almost an extension of her body in looking at the photographic record she has made of the natural world in her many travels. In 2014, a book of Vaughn’s photographs, Of Time and Place, was published. Her work is included in the collections of the New Jersey State Museum and Princeton University among other public institutions and in many private collections.

Diane Burko carries on the landscape tradition of the 19th century, but gives it a 21st century perspective. Burko has always painted the extreme landscape, including the world’s largest ice fields—Greenland, Antarctica (twice), Argentina’s Patagonia, Alaska, and the Northern Atlantic just below the Arctic Circle. In the last few years, the works she has been creating have been shown in over 100 exhibitions throughout the country in such venues as the National Academy of Sciences, Washington, DC as well as the more usual venues of art museums and galleries.

Anita Glesta works in sculpture, video, and installation to create settings that engage people with the space around them physically and metaphorically. Her video installation, Watershed, included in this exhibition is a public art project that has been installed previously during the New Museum Ideas City Festival in New York City, and on the surface of the National Theater in London facing the Thames. It also was seen in 2017 in Red Hook, Brooklyn, as an immersive video on the streets of the community to commemorate the fifth anniversary of Hurricane Sandy. She has been a recipient of many grants and awards, among them a New York Foundation of the Arts fellowship, a Puffin Foundation grant, a Pollock/Krasner fellowship, and a New York State Council for the Arts New Media fellowship.

For over 15 years, Susan Hockaday has addressed our experience of nature as we witness its decline through the forces of climate change. She has worked in several mediums, including etching, handmade paper, collage construction, photography and drawing. Hockaday has lived and worked in Holland and England and has lectured in China. In addition, for almost 50 years, she has resided on Cape Breton Island, Nova Scotia, with her family during the summer. The new landscape of detritus has been her focus for the photographs in this exhibition.

“It takes a special kind of artist to transform melting glaciers, rising sea levels, and disappearing coral reefs into stunning visuals that bring both beauty and awareness to our environmental issues,” says artistic director Maria Evans. “We hope that this exhibition can inspire us all to take better care of the world, working to preserve its natural beauty.”

I am Innocent: The Migration Back to Freedom for the Innocent in Prison

For the thousands of wrongfully-convicted men and women in this country, their journey starts with a tremendous shock. They are arrested for a serious crime they had nothing to do with. They ultimately wind up in court and despite all evidence to the contrary, they believe it is only a matter of time before police, prosecutors and the judge will realize their mistake. But that never happens. They are locked away with little chance of ever seeing freedom again while living in the hell of maximum security prisons, surrounded by murderers, rapists, and disinterested prison guards. But they must find a way to adapt as this is where they will live for years and years before someone will hear their cries for justice.

Meanwhile, life on the outside goes on without them. They miss countless graduations, birthdays, deaths, and other pivotal moments. Years later for the few who are able to migrate back home after navigating a hostile criminal justice system, they will find that freedom is very different, almost foreign.

This is another difficult journey: they’re back home and in society, but nothing is the same. And again, they must find a way to adapt and live.

The photos and stories in this exhibit will convey the physical and emotional upheaval associated with losing and re-gaining lost freedom and family. For all of the Centurion exonorees, they also find family in the brothers and sisters who have taken the same journey to freedom.

Sixty-one innocent men and women have been freed by Centurion, the first innocence organization, founded in Princeton in 1980.

As this exhibit illustrates: this could happen to anyone.

Local Women in their Crowns: A Portraits and Stories Community Project

 

In conjunction with McCarter Theatre Center‘s production of Crowns, directed by Regina Taylor, the Arts Council of Princeton and McCarter have partnered to create Local Women in their Crowns: A Portraits and Stories Community Project.

Inspired by the book of the same name from which Crowns was created, this visual storytelling project captures portraits and the shared stories of Black women of all ages and backgrounds in their church hats. The culminating exhibition serves as a celebration of African American culture and tradition on display at the Arts Council of Princeton, the Princeton Public Library, and the lobbies of McCarter Theatre.
Photography by Bentrice Jusu and S. Bola Okoya.

[caption id="attachment_20736" align="aligncenter" width="300"] This exhibition is being held in collaborations with Migrations, a community-wide investigation of the theme of migration taking place throughout Princeton from February through May, 2018.[/caption]

Saturday, April 21

Artist Talk and Book Signing with Diane Burko and Michael Lemonick

- Free and Open to the Public!

Join the Arts Council of Princeton for an Artist Talk and Book Signing with featured artist Diane Burko and author Michael Lemonick.

This event is held in conjunction with Earth, Fire, Water, Ice, Debris: Five Artists Comment on the Environment, on view in the ACP’s award-winning Taplin Gallery.

DIANE BURKO carries on the landscape tradition of the 19th century, but gives it a 21st century perspective. Burko has always painted the extreme landscape, including the world’s largest ice fields—Greenland, Antarctica (twice), Argentina’s Patagonia, Alaska, and the Northern Atlantic just below the Arctic Circle. In the last few years, the works she has been creating have been shown in over 100 exhibitions throughout the country in such venues as the National Academy of Sciences, Washington, DC as well as the more usual venues of art museums and galleries. Learn more.

MICHAEL D. LEMONICK is the Opinion Editor at Scientific American. He has written more than 50 Time magazine cover stories on science, and has written for National Geographic, The New Yorker and other publications. Learn more.

Earth, Fire, Water, Ice, Debris: Five Artists Comment on the Environment

Fire, Earth, Water, Ice, Debris features original work by Helena Bienstock, Diane Burko, Anita Glesta, Susan Hockaday, Martha Vaughn and is curated by Judith K. Brodsky.

We are in a period of artmaking in which artists have moved out of the attic into the world. In this age of images, artists are using their powerful visual skills to make us aware of the issues in the world around us as well as the beauty. These five artists, each in her own way, have turned their attention to the environment, in some cases using unexpected mediums. Who would think of using clay to mourn the disappearing coral reefs or video to immerse us in a vision of rising sea water? They come from different backgrounds to this point in their careers. – Judy Brodsky

Helena Bienstock has been working with clay since the early 1970s, but at the same time has had a long-term teaching career both in Princeton and New York City. She has been active in helping to sustain cultural organizations in New York State and New Jersey, such as the Arts Council of Princeton itself. In appreciation, the clay studio in the Arts Council building is named the Helena Bienstock Clay Studio. Her passion for the environment infuses all her work, bringing together art and social consciousness.

Martha Vaughn has thousands of photographs archived on her computer. One would think her camera is almost an extension of her body in looking at the photographic record she has made of the natural world in her many travels. In 2014, a book of Vaughn’s photographs, Of Time and Place, was published. Her work is included in the collections of the New Jersey State Museum and Princeton University among other public institutions and in many private collections.

Diane Burko carries on the landscape tradition of the 19th century, but gives it a 21st century perspective. Burko has always painted the extreme landscape, including the world’s largest ice fields—Greenland, Antarctica (twice), Argentina’s Patagonia, Alaska, and the Northern Atlantic just below the Arctic Circle. In the last few years, the works she has been creating have been shown in over 100 exhibitions throughout the country in such venues as the National Academy of Sciences, Washington, DC as well as the more usual venues of art museums and galleries.

Anita Glesta works in sculpture, video, and installation to create settings that engage people with the space around them physically and metaphorically. Her video installation, Watershed, included in this exhibition is a public art project that has been installed previously during the New Museum Ideas City Festival in New York City, and on the surface of the National Theater in London facing the Thames. It also was seen in 2017 in Red Hook, Brooklyn, as an immersive video on the streets of the community to commemorate the fifth anniversary of Hurricane Sandy. She has been a recipient of many grants and awards, among them a New York Foundation of the Arts fellowship, a Puffin Foundation grant, a Pollock/Krasner fellowship, and a New York State Council for the Arts New Media fellowship.

For over 15 years, Susan Hockaday has addressed our experience of nature as we witness its decline through the forces of climate change. She has worked in several mediums, including etching, handmade paper, collage construction, photography and drawing. Hockaday has lived and worked in Holland and England and has lectured in China. In addition, for almost 50 years, she has resided on Cape Breton Island, Nova Scotia, with her family during the summer. The new landscape of detritus has been her focus for the photographs in this exhibition.

“It takes a special kind of artist to transform melting glaciers, rising sea levels, and disappearing coral reefs into stunning visuals that bring both beauty and awareness to our environmental issues,” says artistic director Maria Evans. “We hope that this exhibition can inspire us all to take better care of the world, working to preserve its natural beauty.”

I am Innocent: The Migration Back to Freedom for the Innocent in Prison

For the thousands of wrongfully-convicted men and women in this country, their journey starts with a tremendous shock. They are arrested for a serious crime they had nothing to do with. They ultimately wind up in court and despite all evidence to the contrary, they believe it is only a matter of time before police, prosecutors and the judge will realize their mistake. But that never happens. They are locked away with little chance of ever seeing freedom again while living in the hell of maximum security prisons, surrounded by murderers, rapists, and disinterested prison guards. But they must find a way to adapt as this is where they will live for years and years before someone will hear their cries for justice.

Meanwhile, life on the outside goes on without them. They miss countless graduations, birthdays, deaths, and other pivotal moments. Years later for the few who are able to migrate back home after navigating a hostile criminal justice system, they will find that freedom is very different, almost foreign.

This is another difficult journey: they’re back home and in society, but nothing is the same. And again, they must find a way to adapt and live.

The photos and stories in this exhibit will convey the physical and emotional upheaval associated with losing and re-gaining lost freedom and family. For all of the Centurion exonorees, they also find family in the brothers and sisters who have taken the same journey to freedom.

Sixty-one innocent men and women have been freed by Centurion, the first innocence organization, founded in Princeton in 1980.

As this exhibit illustrates: this could happen to anyone.

Local Women in their Crowns: A Portraits and Stories Community Project

 

In conjunction with McCarter Theatre Center‘s production of Crowns, directed by Regina Taylor, the Arts Council of Princeton and McCarter have partnered to create Local Women in their Crowns: A Portraits and Stories Community Project.

Inspired by the book of the same name from which Crowns was created, this visual storytelling project captures portraits and the shared stories of Black women of all ages and backgrounds in their church hats. The culminating exhibition serves as a celebration of African American culture and tradition on display at the Arts Council of Princeton, the Princeton Public Library, and the lobbies of McCarter Theatre.
Photography by Bentrice Jusu and S. Bola Okoya.

[caption id="attachment_20736" align="aligncenter" width="300"] This exhibition is being held in collaborations with Migrations, a community-wide investigation of the theme of migration taking place throughout Princeton from February through May, 2018.[/caption]

Sunday, April 22

Earth, Fire, Water, Ice, Debris: Five Artists Comment on the Environment

Fire, Earth, Water, Ice, Debris features original work by Helena Bienstock, Diane Burko, Anita Glesta, Susan Hockaday, Martha Vaughn and is curated by Judith K. Brodsky.

We are in a period of artmaking in which artists have moved out of the attic into the world. In this age of images, artists are using their powerful visual skills to make us aware of the issues in the world around us as well as the beauty. These five artists, each in her own way, have turned their attention to the environment, in some cases using unexpected mediums. Who would think of using clay to mourn the disappearing coral reefs or video to immerse us in a vision of rising sea water? They come from different backgrounds to this point in their careers. – Judy Brodsky

Helena Bienstock has been working with clay since the early 1970s, but at the same time has had a long-term teaching career both in Princeton and New York City. She has been active in helping to sustain cultural organizations in New York State and New Jersey, such as the Arts Council of Princeton itself. In appreciation, the clay studio in the Arts Council building is named the Helena Bienstock Clay Studio. Her passion for the environment infuses all her work, bringing together art and social consciousness.

Martha Vaughn has thousands of photographs archived on her computer. One would think her camera is almost an extension of her body in looking at the photographic record she has made of the natural world in her many travels. In 2014, a book of Vaughn’s photographs, Of Time and Place, was published. Her work is included in the collections of the New Jersey State Museum and Princeton University among other public institutions and in many private collections.

Diane Burko carries on the landscape tradition of the 19th century, but gives it a 21st century perspective. Burko has always painted the extreme landscape, including the world’s largest ice fields—Greenland, Antarctica (twice), Argentina’s Patagonia, Alaska, and the Northern Atlantic just below the Arctic Circle. In the last few years, the works she has been creating have been shown in over 100 exhibitions throughout the country in such venues as the National Academy of Sciences, Washington, DC as well as the more usual venues of art museums and galleries.

Anita Glesta works in sculpture, video, and installation to create settings that engage people with the space around them physically and metaphorically. Her video installation, Watershed, included in this exhibition is a public art project that has been installed previously during the New Museum Ideas City Festival in New York City, and on the surface of the National Theater in London facing the Thames. It also was seen in 2017 in Red Hook, Brooklyn, as an immersive video on the streets of the community to commemorate the fifth anniversary of Hurricane Sandy. She has been a recipient of many grants and awards, among them a New York Foundation of the Arts fellowship, a Puffin Foundation grant, a Pollock/Krasner fellowship, and a New York State Council for the Arts New Media fellowship.

For over 15 years, Susan Hockaday has addressed our experience of nature as we witness its decline through the forces of climate change. She has worked in several mediums, including etching, handmade paper, collage construction, photography and drawing. Hockaday has lived and worked in Holland and England and has lectured in China. In addition, for almost 50 years, she has resided on Cape Breton Island, Nova Scotia, with her family during the summer. The new landscape of detritus has been her focus for the photographs in this exhibition.

“It takes a special kind of artist to transform melting glaciers, rising sea levels, and disappearing coral reefs into stunning visuals that bring both beauty and awareness to our environmental issues,” says artistic director Maria Evans. “We hope that this exhibition can inspire us all to take better care of the world, working to preserve its natural beauty.”

I am Innocent: The Migration Back to Freedom for the Innocent in Prison

For the thousands of wrongfully-convicted men and women in this country, their journey starts with a tremendous shock. They are arrested for a serious crime they had nothing to do with. They ultimately wind up in court and despite all evidence to the contrary, they believe it is only a matter of time before police, prosecutors and the judge will realize their mistake. But that never happens. They are locked away with little chance of ever seeing freedom again while living in the hell of maximum security prisons, surrounded by murderers, rapists, and disinterested prison guards. But they must find a way to adapt as this is where they will live for years and years before someone will hear their cries for justice.

Meanwhile, life on the outside goes on without them. They miss countless graduations, birthdays, deaths, and other pivotal moments. Years later for the few who are able to migrate back home after navigating a hostile criminal justice system, they will find that freedom is very different, almost foreign.

This is another difficult journey: they’re back home and in society, but nothing is the same. And again, they must find a way to adapt and live.

The photos and stories in this exhibit will convey the physical and emotional upheaval associated with losing and re-gaining lost freedom and family. For all of the Centurion exonorees, they also find family in the brothers and sisters who have taken the same journey to freedom.

Sixty-one innocent men and women have been freed by Centurion, the first innocence organization, founded in Princeton in 1980.

As this exhibit illustrates: this could happen to anyone.

Local Women in their Crowns: A Portraits and Stories Community Project

 

In conjunction with McCarter Theatre Center‘s production of Crowns, directed by Regina Taylor, the Arts Council of Princeton and McCarter have partnered to create Local Women in their Crowns: A Portraits and Stories Community Project.

Inspired by the book of the same name from which Crowns was created, this visual storytelling project captures portraits and the shared stories of Black women of all ages and backgrounds in their church hats. The culminating exhibition serves as a celebration of African American culture and tradition on display at the Arts Council of Princeton, the Princeton Public Library, and the lobbies of McCarter Theatre.
Photography by Bentrice Jusu and S. Bola Okoya.

[caption id="attachment_20736" align="aligncenter" width="300"] This exhibition is being held in collaborations with Migrations, a community-wide investigation of the theme of migration taking place throughout Princeton from February through May, 2018.[/caption]

Monday, April 23

Neighborhood Children’s Choir of Westminster Choir College: Community Stage Event

- Free and Open to the Public!

This choral experience for young singers in grades 3 through 5 is led by Assistant Professor Tom Shelton, assisted by Westminster Choir College students, in collaboration with the Princeton Family YMCA. The Westminster Neighborhood Children’s Choir offers choir members the opportunity to sing together, play musical games and develop music reading skills.

Program is free, but advance registration is recommended. Priority will be given to those who have registered in advance. Click here to reserve your seat for this performance on Eventbrite.

This performance is part of the Arts Council of Princeton’s Community Stage Series. Community Stage productions are free (and nearly free) held in collaboration with local artistic groups and organizations. Community Stage programming enable the Arts Council’s Solley Theater to act as an accessible space for community partnerships and high-quality artistic experiences.

Earth, Fire, Water, Ice, Debris: Five Artists Comment on the Environment

Fire, Earth, Water, Ice, Debris features original work by Helena Bienstock, Diane Burko, Anita Glesta, Susan Hockaday, Martha Vaughn and is curated by Judith K. Brodsky.

We are in a period of artmaking in which artists have moved out of the attic into the world. In this age of images, artists are using their powerful visual skills to make us aware of the issues in the world around us as well as the beauty. These five artists, each in her own way, have turned their attention to the environment, in some cases using unexpected mediums. Who would think of using clay to mourn the disappearing coral reefs or video to immerse us in a vision of rising sea water? They come from different backgrounds to this point in their careers. – Judy Brodsky

Helena Bienstock has been working with clay since the early 1970s, but at the same time has had a long-term teaching career both in Princeton and New York City. She has been active in helping to sustain cultural organizations in New York State and New Jersey, such as the Arts Council of Princeton itself. In appreciation, the clay studio in the Arts Council building is named the Helena Bienstock Clay Studio. Her passion for the environment infuses all her work, bringing together art and social consciousness.

Martha Vaughn has thousands of photographs archived on her computer. One would think her camera is almost an extension of her body in looking at the photographic record she has made of the natural world in her many travels. In 2014, a book of Vaughn’s photographs, Of Time and Place, was published. Her work is included in the collections of the New Jersey State Museum and Princeton University among other public institutions and in many private collections.

Diane Burko carries on the landscape tradition of the 19th century, but gives it a 21st century perspective. Burko has always painted the extreme landscape, including the world’s largest ice fields—Greenland, Antarctica (twice), Argentina’s Patagonia, Alaska, and the Northern Atlantic just below the Arctic Circle. In the last few years, the works she has been creating have been shown in over 100 exhibitions throughout the country in such venues as the National Academy of Sciences, Washington, DC as well as the more usual venues of art museums and galleries.

Anita Glesta works in sculpture, video, and installation to create settings that engage people with the space around them physically and metaphorically. Her video installation, Watershed, included in this exhibition is a public art project that has been installed previously during the New Museum Ideas City Festival in New York City, and on the surface of the National Theater in London facing the Thames. It also was seen in 2017 in Red Hook, Brooklyn, as an immersive video on the streets of the community to commemorate the fifth anniversary of Hurricane Sandy. She has been a recipient of many grants and awards, among them a New York Foundation of the Arts fellowship, a Puffin Foundation grant, a Pollock/Krasner fellowship, and a New York State Council for the Arts New Media fellowship.

For over 15 years, Susan Hockaday has addressed our experience of nature as we witness its decline through the forces of climate change. She has worked in several mediums, including etching, handmade paper, collage construction, photography and drawing. Hockaday has lived and worked in Holland and England and has lectured in China. In addition, for almost 50 years, she has resided on Cape Breton Island, Nova Scotia, with her family during the summer. The new landscape of detritus has been her focus for the photographs in this exhibition.

“It takes a special kind of artist to transform melting glaciers, rising sea levels, and disappearing coral reefs into stunning visuals that bring both beauty and awareness to our environmental issues,” says artistic director Maria Evans. “We hope that this exhibition can inspire us all to take better care of the world, working to preserve its natural beauty.”

I am Innocent: The Migration Back to Freedom for the Innocent in Prison

For the thousands of wrongfully-convicted men and women in this country, their journey starts with a tremendous shock. They are arrested for a serious crime they had nothing to do with. They ultimately wind up in court and despite all evidence to the contrary, they believe it is only a matter of time before police, prosecutors and the judge will realize their mistake. But that never happens. They are locked away with little chance of ever seeing freedom again while living in the hell of maximum security prisons, surrounded by murderers, rapists, and disinterested prison guards. But they must find a way to adapt as this is where they will live for years and years before someone will hear their cries for justice.

Meanwhile, life on the outside goes on without them. They miss countless graduations, birthdays, deaths, and other pivotal moments. Years later for the few who are able to migrate back home after navigating a hostile criminal justice system, they will find that freedom is very different, almost foreign.

This is another difficult journey: they’re back home and in society, but nothing is the same. And again, they must find a way to adapt and live.

The photos and stories in this exhibit will convey the physical and emotional upheaval associated with losing and re-gaining lost freedom and family. For all of the Centurion exonorees, they also find family in the brothers and sisters who have taken the same journey to freedom.

Sixty-one innocent men and women have been freed by Centurion, the first innocence organization, founded in Princeton in 1980.

As this exhibit illustrates: this could happen to anyone.

Local Women in their Crowns: A Portraits and Stories Community Project

 

In conjunction with McCarter Theatre Center‘s production of Crowns, directed by Regina Taylor, the Arts Council of Princeton and McCarter have partnered to create Local Women in their Crowns: A Portraits and Stories Community Project.

Inspired by the book of the same name from which Crowns was created, this visual storytelling project captures portraits and the shared stories of Black women of all ages and backgrounds in their church hats. The culminating exhibition serves as a celebration of African American culture and tradition on display at the Arts Council of Princeton, the Princeton Public Library, and the lobbies of McCarter Theatre.
Photography by Bentrice Jusu and S. Bola Okoya.

[caption id="attachment_20736" align="aligncenter" width="300"] This exhibition is being held in collaborations with Migrations, a community-wide investigation of the theme of migration taking place throughout Princeton from February through May, 2018.[/caption]

Tuesday, April 24

Earth, Fire, Water, Ice, Debris: Five Artists Comment on the Environment

Fire, Earth, Water, Ice, Debris features original work by Helena Bienstock, Diane Burko, Anita Glesta, Susan Hockaday, Martha Vaughn and is curated by Judith K. Brodsky.

We are in a period of artmaking in which artists have moved out of the attic into the world. In this age of images, artists are using their powerful visual skills to make us aware of the issues in the world around us as well as the beauty. These five artists, each in her own way, have turned their attention to the environment, in some cases using unexpected mediums. Who would think of using clay to mourn the disappearing coral reefs or video to immerse us in a vision of rising sea water? They come from different backgrounds to this point in their careers. – Judy Brodsky

Helena Bienstock has been working with clay since the early 1970s, but at the same time has had a long-term teaching career both in Princeton and New York City. She has been active in helping to sustain cultural organizations in New York State and New Jersey, such as the Arts Council of Princeton itself. In appreciation, the clay studio in the Arts Council building is named the Helena Bienstock Clay Studio. Her passion for the environment infuses all her work, bringing together art and social consciousness.

Martha Vaughn has thousands of photographs archived on her computer. One would think her camera is almost an extension of her body in looking at the photographic record she has made of the natural world in her many travels. In 2014, a book of Vaughn’s photographs, Of Time and Place, was published. Her work is included in the collections of the New Jersey State Museum and Princeton University among other public institutions and in many private collections.

Diane Burko carries on the landscape tradition of the 19th century, but gives it a 21st century perspective. Burko has always painted the extreme landscape, including the world’s largest ice fields—Greenland, Antarctica (twice), Argentina’s Patagonia, Alaska, and the Northern Atlantic just below the Arctic Circle. In the last few years, the works she has been creating have been shown in over 100 exhibitions throughout the country in such venues as the National Academy of Sciences, Washington, DC as well as the more usual venues of art museums and galleries.

Anita Glesta works in sculpture, video, and installation to create settings that engage people with the space around them physically and metaphorically. Her video installation, Watershed, included in this exhibition is a public art project that has been installed previously during the New Museum Ideas City Festival in New York City, and on the surface of the National Theater in London facing the Thames. It also was seen in 2017 in Red Hook, Brooklyn, as an immersive video on the streets of the community to commemorate the fifth anniversary of Hurricane Sandy. She has been a recipient of many grants and awards, among them a New York Foundation of the Arts fellowship, a Puffin Foundation grant, a Pollock/Krasner fellowship, and a New York State Council for the Arts New Media fellowship.

For over 15 years, Susan Hockaday has addressed our experience of nature as we witness its decline through the forces of climate change. She has worked in several mediums, including etching, handmade paper, collage construction, photography and drawing. Hockaday has lived and worked in Holland and England and has lectured in China. In addition, for almost 50 years, she has resided on Cape Breton Island, Nova Scotia, with her family during the summer. The new landscape of detritus has been her focus for the photographs in this exhibition.

“It takes a special kind of artist to transform melting glaciers, rising sea levels, and disappearing coral reefs into stunning visuals that bring both beauty and awareness to our environmental issues,” says artistic director Maria Evans. “We hope that this exhibition can inspire us all to take better care of the world, working to preserve its natural beauty.”

I am Innocent: The Migration Back to Freedom for the Innocent in Prison

For the thousands of wrongfully-convicted men and women in this country, their journey starts with a tremendous shock. They are arrested for a serious crime they had nothing to do with. They ultimately wind up in court and despite all evidence to the contrary, they believe it is only a matter of time before police, prosecutors and the judge will realize their mistake. But that never happens. They are locked away with little chance of ever seeing freedom again while living in the hell of maximum security prisons, surrounded by murderers, rapists, and disinterested prison guards. But they must find a way to adapt as this is where they will live for years and years before someone will hear their cries for justice.

Meanwhile, life on the outside goes on without them. They miss countless graduations, birthdays, deaths, and other pivotal moments. Years later for the few who are able to migrate back home after navigating a hostile criminal justice system, they will find that freedom is very different, almost foreign.

This is another difficult journey: they’re back home and in society, but nothing is the same. And again, they must find a way to adapt and live.

The photos and stories in this exhibit will convey the physical and emotional upheaval associated with losing and re-gaining lost freedom and family. For all of the Centurion exonorees, they also find family in the brothers and sisters who have taken the same journey to freedom.

Sixty-one innocent men and women have been freed by Centurion, the first innocence organization, founded in Princeton in 1980.

As this exhibit illustrates: this could happen to anyone.

Local Women in their Crowns: A Portraits and Stories Community Project

 

In conjunction with McCarter Theatre Center‘s production of Crowns, directed by Regina Taylor, the Arts Council of Princeton and McCarter have partnered to create Local Women in their Crowns: A Portraits and Stories Community Project.

Inspired by the book of the same name from which Crowns was created, this visual storytelling project captures portraits and the shared stories of Black women of all ages and backgrounds in their church hats. The culminating exhibition serves as a celebration of African American culture and tradition on display at the Arts Council of Princeton, the Princeton Public Library, and the lobbies of McCarter Theatre.
Photography by Bentrice Jusu and S. Bola Okoya.

[caption id="attachment_20736" align="aligncenter" width="300"] This exhibition is being held in collaborations with Migrations, a community-wide investigation of the theme of migration taking place throughout Princeton from February through May, 2018.[/caption]