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Friday, October 5

Annual Members Exhibition 2018

The Arts Council of Princeton presents its Annual Members Exhibition, in which artist members may enter an artwork to be displayed in the Taplin Gallery. This popular and inclusive exhibition celebrates our diverse, creative art community. The exhibition annually inspires inspired participation in Arts Council programs while providing an opportunity for our artists to share their talents with the public. All works in painting, drawing, mixed media, photography, printmaking, ceramics, or sculpture are welcome.

 

Join us for an Opening Reception on Saturday, September 8 from 3-5pm, immediately following the Arts Council of Princeton’s Fall Open House.

Drawings by Mi Ju

The Arts Council of Princeton and the Princeton Public Library present a curated exhibition of paired poems and artwork. This exhibition demonstrates how the image and the written word can be in conversation with each other. Drawings by Brooklyn-based artist, Mi Ju. Poems by John Clare, Rita Dove, Pauline Johnson (Tekahionwake), and Dara-Lyn Shrager.

Mi Ju is an internationally exhibited artist who lives and works in New York City.

Out of Character

I have a lifelong love affair with paper and have saved, catalogued and hoarded report cards, postcards, travel brochures, invoices, documents, medical records and books of travels, important personal events and several generations of my family’s ephemera.

My investigations into portraiture through the use of original source documents and related material has its roots in the desire to record and capture time while exploring memory in order to establish identities and reveal new perspectives. Even as portraits typically evoke a likeness, filtered through personality or mood, they also form a historical record that tells an incomplete story. Documents are nonjudgmental and reflect many forgotten aspects of personal history as they relate to society, cultural practices and personal idiosyncrasies. They are evidence of the multiple aspects of a point in time; building blocks to the whole. The reuse of these precious papers is with the intent of repurposing them for future reflection. They become not just the surface of the portrait, but materialize as inherent elements of the narrative. Words, times and dates of particular importance blend into shadows in order to tell the story.

My bird travelogues are represented by a native species from an area I’ve traveled and the papers included reflect my experiences there.

My current series, “Character Studies”, are collages comprised of papers on which I have written letters to the subject using rubber stamps and handwriting. These images are the amalgam of outward appearance and inward introspection.

-Trudy Borenstein-Sugiura



Trudy Borenstein-Sugiura is an award-winning designer of fine jewelry and tabletop objects whose work is included in the Permanent Collection of the Smithsonian Institution at the Cooper-Hewitt Museum, and has been exhibited and sold in galleries, design stores and museums internationally. After a full and successful career in the jewelry industry, Trudy has returned to her fine art training to create art in its purest form. She is inspired by her current explorations; creating portraits out of the important documents of her subject’s lives. Carefully organizing and categorizing medical records, report cards, death certificates, maps and more, to construct likenesses that explore memory and reveal new perspectives. Through scrupulous arrangements and obsessive detail, she is telling stories; exploring the past and repurposing it for future reflection. In the past 2 years, her current work has been exhibited in galleries in New York City, Chicago, Denver, L.A. and the Hamptons.

The Shape of Color

The Arts Council of Princeton presents The Shape of Color: Photographs by Walter Frank in the Solley Lobby Gallery. Join us for an Opening Reception on Saturday, October 6 from 3-5pm.

 

“In 1970, I purchased a Honeywell Pentax 35m camera not long after arriving in San Francisco as a newly minted attorney. My sojourn in California lasted 4 years; Roughly 31 years later I finally bid farewell to my loyal friend and entered the digital age.

All the framed pictures in this exhibit were taken with various iterations of the Panasonic Lumix Digital Camera, its main virtues being a superb Leica lens and unobtrusive size that allowed me to take it anywhere and use it or not as I pleased. These images have not been photo-shopped.  The colors you see are what I saw or, more accurately, what the camera saw.

My father was a gifted commercial artist who, among other things, drew Captain Midnight and Gabby Hayes comics. I inherited quite literally not an iota of his talent. Even my stick figures draw puzzled looks. So photography for me has been the default option for expressing myself however indirectly in a visual manner.

I had originally thought of calling this exhibit, Things You Might Not Notice.  For me, the fun of photography is trying to see things from a slightly different angle. The camera’s great gift is its capacity to isolate and capture what you think you see. Sometimes the camera says, ‘What exactly were you thinking?’ Occasionally, however, it says, ‘Not bad.'”

-Walter Frank

 

[caption id="attachment_22363" align="aligncenter" width="381"] Photography by Walter Frank[/caption]

Saturday, October 6

Drawings by Mi Ju

The Arts Council of Princeton and the Princeton Public Library present a curated exhibition of paired poems and artwork. This exhibition demonstrates how the image and the written word can be in conversation with each other. Drawings by Brooklyn-based artist, Mi Ju. Poems by John Clare, Rita Dove, Pauline Johnson (Tekahionwake), and Dara-Lyn Shrager.

Mi Ju is an internationally exhibited artist who lives and works in New York City.

Out of Character

I have a lifelong love affair with paper and have saved, catalogued and hoarded report cards, postcards, travel brochures, invoices, documents, medical records and books of travels, important personal events and several generations of my family’s ephemera.

My investigations into portraiture through the use of original source documents and related material has its roots in the desire to record and capture time while exploring memory in order to establish identities and reveal new perspectives. Even as portraits typically evoke a likeness, filtered through personality or mood, they also form a historical record that tells an incomplete story. Documents are nonjudgmental and reflect many forgotten aspects of personal history as they relate to society, cultural practices and personal idiosyncrasies. They are evidence of the multiple aspects of a point in time; building blocks to the whole. The reuse of these precious papers is with the intent of repurposing them for future reflection. They become not just the surface of the portrait, but materialize as inherent elements of the narrative. Words, times and dates of particular importance blend into shadows in order to tell the story.

My bird travelogues are represented by a native species from an area I’ve traveled and the papers included reflect my experiences there.

My current series, “Character Studies”, are collages comprised of papers on which I have written letters to the subject using rubber stamps and handwriting. These images are the amalgam of outward appearance and inward introspection.

-Trudy Borenstein-Sugiura



Trudy Borenstein-Sugiura is an award-winning designer of fine jewelry and tabletop objects whose work is included in the Permanent Collection of the Smithsonian Institution at the Cooper-Hewitt Museum, and has been exhibited and sold in galleries, design stores and museums internationally. After a full and successful career in the jewelry industry, Trudy has returned to her fine art training to create art in its purest form. She is inspired by her current explorations; creating portraits out of the important documents of her subject’s lives. Carefully organizing and categorizing medical records, report cards, death certificates, maps and more, to construct likenesses that explore memory and reveal new perspectives. Through scrupulous arrangements and obsessive detail, she is telling stories; exploring the past and repurposing it for future reflection. In the past 2 years, her current work has been exhibited in galleries in New York City, Chicago, Denver, L.A. and the Hamptons.

The Shape of Color

The Arts Council of Princeton presents The Shape of Color: Photographs by Walter Frank in the Solley Lobby Gallery. Join us for an Opening Reception on Saturday, October 6 from 3-5pm.

 

“In 1970, I purchased a Honeywell Pentax 35m camera not long after arriving in San Francisco as a newly minted attorney. My sojourn in California lasted 4 years; Roughly 31 years later I finally bid farewell to my loyal friend and entered the digital age.

All the framed pictures in this exhibit were taken with various iterations of the Panasonic Lumix Digital Camera, its main virtues being a superb Leica lens and unobtrusive size that allowed me to take it anywhere and use it or not as I pleased. These images have not been photo-shopped.  The colors you see are what I saw or, more accurately, what the camera saw.

My father was a gifted commercial artist who, among other things, drew Captain Midnight and Gabby Hayes comics. I inherited quite literally not an iota of his talent. Even my stick figures draw puzzled looks. So photography for me has been the default option for expressing myself however indirectly in a visual manner.

I had originally thought of calling this exhibit, Things You Might Not Notice.  For me, the fun of photography is trying to see things from a slightly different angle. The camera’s great gift is its capacity to isolate and capture what you think you see. Sometimes the camera says, ‘What exactly were you thinking?’ Occasionally, however, it says, ‘Not bad.'”

-Walter Frank

 

[caption id="attachment_22363" align="aligncenter" width="381"] Photography by Walter Frank[/caption]

Sunday, October 7

Festival Cultural Latino

- Free and Open to the Public!

The rich cultural life of Princeton’s Latino community is celebrated with an afternoon of music, dance, food and crafts. The plaza will be transformed into a mercado with local artisans and restaurants on site along with family-friendly activities and free entertainment. Watch live art-making by Marlon Davila, Saul Zambrano, and Felix Gonzáles. Enjoy food from Totopos Mexican Restaurant and live performances by Lisa Botalico Fiesta Flamenca.

Co-sponsored by the Princeton Public Library, the Arts Council of Princeton, and Mi Pueblo Lindo.

Drawings by Mi Ju

The Arts Council of Princeton and the Princeton Public Library present a curated exhibition of paired poems and artwork. This exhibition demonstrates how the image and the written word can be in conversation with each other. Drawings by Brooklyn-based artist, Mi Ju. Poems by John Clare, Rita Dove, Pauline Johnson (Tekahionwake), and Dara-Lyn Shrager.

Mi Ju is an internationally exhibited artist who lives and works in New York City.

Out of Character

I have a lifelong love affair with paper and have saved, catalogued and hoarded report cards, postcards, travel brochures, invoices, documents, medical records and books of travels, important personal events and several generations of my family’s ephemera.

My investigations into portraiture through the use of original source documents and related material has its roots in the desire to record and capture time while exploring memory in order to establish identities and reveal new perspectives. Even as portraits typically evoke a likeness, filtered through personality or mood, they also form a historical record that tells an incomplete story. Documents are nonjudgmental and reflect many forgotten aspects of personal history as they relate to society, cultural practices and personal idiosyncrasies. They are evidence of the multiple aspects of a point in time; building blocks to the whole. The reuse of these precious papers is with the intent of repurposing them for future reflection. They become not just the surface of the portrait, but materialize as inherent elements of the narrative. Words, times and dates of particular importance blend into shadows in order to tell the story.

My bird travelogues are represented by a native species from an area I’ve traveled and the papers included reflect my experiences there.

My current series, “Character Studies”, are collages comprised of papers on which I have written letters to the subject using rubber stamps and handwriting. These images are the amalgam of outward appearance and inward introspection.

-Trudy Borenstein-Sugiura



Trudy Borenstein-Sugiura is an award-winning designer of fine jewelry and tabletop objects whose work is included in the Permanent Collection of the Smithsonian Institution at the Cooper-Hewitt Museum, and has been exhibited and sold in galleries, design stores and museums internationally. After a full and successful career in the jewelry industry, Trudy has returned to her fine art training to create art in its purest form. She is inspired by her current explorations; creating portraits out of the important documents of her subject’s lives. Carefully organizing and categorizing medical records, report cards, death certificates, maps and more, to construct likenesses that explore memory and reveal new perspectives. Through scrupulous arrangements and obsessive detail, she is telling stories; exploring the past and repurposing it for future reflection. In the past 2 years, her current work has been exhibited in galleries in New York City, Chicago, Denver, L.A. and the Hamptons.

The Shape of Color

The Arts Council of Princeton presents The Shape of Color: Photographs by Walter Frank in the Solley Lobby Gallery. Join us for an Opening Reception on Saturday, October 6 from 3-5pm.

 

“In 1970, I purchased a Honeywell Pentax 35m camera not long after arriving in San Francisco as a newly minted attorney. My sojourn in California lasted 4 years; Roughly 31 years later I finally bid farewell to my loyal friend and entered the digital age.

All the framed pictures in this exhibit were taken with various iterations of the Panasonic Lumix Digital Camera, its main virtues being a superb Leica lens and unobtrusive size that allowed me to take it anywhere and use it or not as I pleased. These images have not been photo-shopped.  The colors you see are what I saw or, more accurately, what the camera saw.

My father was a gifted commercial artist who, among other things, drew Captain Midnight and Gabby Hayes comics. I inherited quite literally not an iota of his talent. Even my stick figures draw puzzled looks. So photography for me has been the default option for expressing myself however indirectly in a visual manner.

I had originally thought of calling this exhibit, Things You Might Not Notice.  For me, the fun of photography is trying to see things from a slightly different angle. The camera’s great gift is its capacity to isolate and capture what you think you see. Sometimes the camera says, ‘What exactly were you thinking?’ Occasionally, however, it says, ‘Not bad.'”

-Walter Frank

 

[caption id="attachment_22363" align="aligncenter" width="381"] Photography by Walter Frank[/caption]

Monday, October 8

Drawings by Mi Ju

The Arts Council of Princeton and the Princeton Public Library present a curated exhibition of paired poems and artwork. This exhibition demonstrates how the image and the written word can be in conversation with each other. Drawings by Brooklyn-based artist, Mi Ju. Poems by John Clare, Rita Dove, Pauline Johnson (Tekahionwake), and Dara-Lyn Shrager.

Mi Ju is an internationally exhibited artist who lives and works in New York City.

Out of Character

I have a lifelong love affair with paper and have saved, catalogued and hoarded report cards, postcards, travel brochures, invoices, documents, medical records and books of travels, important personal events and several generations of my family’s ephemera.

My investigations into portraiture through the use of original source documents and related material has its roots in the desire to record and capture time while exploring memory in order to establish identities and reveal new perspectives. Even as portraits typically evoke a likeness, filtered through personality or mood, they also form a historical record that tells an incomplete story. Documents are nonjudgmental and reflect many forgotten aspects of personal history as they relate to society, cultural practices and personal idiosyncrasies. They are evidence of the multiple aspects of a point in time; building blocks to the whole. The reuse of these precious papers is with the intent of repurposing them for future reflection. They become not just the surface of the portrait, but materialize as inherent elements of the narrative. Words, times and dates of particular importance blend into shadows in order to tell the story.

My bird travelogues are represented by a native species from an area I’ve traveled and the papers included reflect my experiences there.

My current series, “Character Studies”, are collages comprised of papers on which I have written letters to the subject using rubber stamps and handwriting. These images are the amalgam of outward appearance and inward introspection.

-Trudy Borenstein-Sugiura



Trudy Borenstein-Sugiura is an award-winning designer of fine jewelry and tabletop objects whose work is included in the Permanent Collection of the Smithsonian Institution at the Cooper-Hewitt Museum, and has been exhibited and sold in galleries, design stores and museums internationally. After a full and successful career in the jewelry industry, Trudy has returned to her fine art training to create art in its purest form. She is inspired by her current explorations; creating portraits out of the important documents of her subject’s lives. Carefully organizing and categorizing medical records, report cards, death certificates, maps and more, to construct likenesses that explore memory and reveal new perspectives. Through scrupulous arrangements and obsessive detail, she is telling stories; exploring the past and repurposing it for future reflection. In the past 2 years, her current work has been exhibited in galleries in New York City, Chicago, Denver, L.A. and the Hamptons.

The Shape of Color

The Arts Council of Princeton presents The Shape of Color: Photographs by Walter Frank in the Solley Lobby Gallery. Join us for an Opening Reception on Saturday, October 6 from 3-5pm.

 

“In 1970, I purchased a Honeywell Pentax 35m camera not long after arriving in San Francisco as a newly minted attorney. My sojourn in California lasted 4 years; Roughly 31 years later I finally bid farewell to my loyal friend and entered the digital age.

All the framed pictures in this exhibit were taken with various iterations of the Panasonic Lumix Digital Camera, its main virtues being a superb Leica lens and unobtrusive size that allowed me to take it anywhere and use it or not as I pleased. These images have not been photo-shopped.  The colors you see are what I saw or, more accurately, what the camera saw.

My father was a gifted commercial artist who, among other things, drew Captain Midnight and Gabby Hayes comics. I inherited quite literally not an iota of his talent. Even my stick figures draw puzzled looks. So photography for me has been the default option for expressing myself however indirectly in a visual manner.

I had originally thought of calling this exhibit, Things You Might Not Notice.  For me, the fun of photography is trying to see things from a slightly different angle. The camera’s great gift is its capacity to isolate and capture what you think you see. Sometimes the camera says, ‘What exactly were you thinking?’ Occasionally, however, it says, ‘Not bad.'”

-Walter Frank

 

[caption id="attachment_22363" align="aligncenter" width="381"] Photography by Walter Frank[/caption]

Tuesday, October 9

Drawings by Mi Ju

The Arts Council of Princeton and the Princeton Public Library present a curated exhibition of paired poems and artwork. This exhibition demonstrates how the image and the written word can be in conversation with each other. Drawings by Brooklyn-based artist, Mi Ju. Poems by John Clare, Rita Dove, Pauline Johnson (Tekahionwake), and Dara-Lyn Shrager.

Mi Ju is an internationally exhibited artist who lives and works in New York City.

Out of Character

I have a lifelong love affair with paper and have saved, catalogued and hoarded report cards, postcards, travel brochures, invoices, documents, medical records and books of travels, important personal events and several generations of my family’s ephemera.

My investigations into portraiture through the use of original source documents and related material has its roots in the desire to record and capture time while exploring memory in order to establish identities and reveal new perspectives. Even as portraits typically evoke a likeness, filtered through personality or mood, they also form a historical record that tells an incomplete story. Documents are nonjudgmental and reflect many forgotten aspects of personal history as they relate to society, cultural practices and personal idiosyncrasies. They are evidence of the multiple aspects of a point in time; building blocks to the whole. The reuse of these precious papers is with the intent of repurposing them for future reflection. They become not just the surface of the portrait, but materialize as inherent elements of the narrative. Words, times and dates of particular importance blend into shadows in order to tell the story.

My bird travelogues are represented by a native species from an area I’ve traveled and the papers included reflect my experiences there.

My current series, “Character Studies”, are collages comprised of papers on which I have written letters to the subject using rubber stamps and handwriting. These images are the amalgam of outward appearance and inward introspection.

-Trudy Borenstein-Sugiura



Trudy Borenstein-Sugiura is an award-winning designer of fine jewelry and tabletop objects whose work is included in the Permanent Collection of the Smithsonian Institution at the Cooper-Hewitt Museum, and has been exhibited and sold in galleries, design stores and museums internationally. After a full and successful career in the jewelry industry, Trudy has returned to her fine art training to create art in its purest form. She is inspired by her current explorations; creating portraits out of the important documents of her subject’s lives. Carefully organizing and categorizing medical records, report cards, death certificates, maps and more, to construct likenesses that explore memory and reveal new perspectives. Through scrupulous arrangements and obsessive detail, she is telling stories; exploring the past and repurposing it for future reflection. In the past 2 years, her current work has been exhibited in galleries in New York City, Chicago, Denver, L.A. and the Hamptons.

The Shape of Color

The Arts Council of Princeton presents The Shape of Color: Photographs by Walter Frank in the Solley Lobby Gallery. Join us for an Opening Reception on Saturday, October 6 from 3-5pm.

 

“In 1970, I purchased a Honeywell Pentax 35m camera not long after arriving in San Francisco as a newly minted attorney. My sojourn in California lasted 4 years; Roughly 31 years later I finally bid farewell to my loyal friend and entered the digital age.

All the framed pictures in this exhibit were taken with various iterations of the Panasonic Lumix Digital Camera, its main virtues being a superb Leica lens and unobtrusive size that allowed me to take it anywhere and use it or not as I pleased. These images have not been photo-shopped.  The colors you see are what I saw or, more accurately, what the camera saw.

My father was a gifted commercial artist who, among other things, drew Captain Midnight and Gabby Hayes comics. I inherited quite literally not an iota of his talent. Even my stick figures draw puzzled looks. So photography for me has been the default option for expressing myself however indirectly in a visual manner.

I had originally thought of calling this exhibit, Things You Might Not Notice.  For me, the fun of photography is trying to see things from a slightly different angle. The camera’s great gift is its capacity to isolate and capture what you think you see. Sometimes the camera says, ‘What exactly were you thinking?’ Occasionally, however, it says, ‘Not bad.'”

-Walter Frank

 

[caption id="attachment_22363" align="aligncenter" width="381"] Photography by Walter Frank[/caption]

Wednesday, October 10

Drawings by Mi Ju

The Arts Council of Princeton and the Princeton Public Library present a curated exhibition of paired poems and artwork. This exhibition demonstrates how the image and the written word can be in conversation with each other. Drawings by Brooklyn-based artist, Mi Ju. Poems by John Clare, Rita Dove, Pauline Johnson (Tekahionwake), and Dara-Lyn Shrager.

Mi Ju is an internationally exhibited artist who lives and works in New York City.

Out of Character

I have a lifelong love affair with paper and have saved, catalogued and hoarded report cards, postcards, travel brochures, invoices, documents, medical records and books of travels, important personal events and several generations of my family’s ephemera.

My investigations into portraiture through the use of original source documents and related material has its roots in the desire to record and capture time while exploring memory in order to establish identities and reveal new perspectives. Even as portraits typically evoke a likeness, filtered through personality or mood, they also form a historical record that tells an incomplete story. Documents are nonjudgmental and reflect many forgotten aspects of personal history as they relate to society, cultural practices and personal idiosyncrasies. They are evidence of the multiple aspects of a point in time; building blocks to the whole. The reuse of these precious papers is with the intent of repurposing them for future reflection. They become not just the surface of the portrait, but materialize as inherent elements of the narrative. Words, times and dates of particular importance blend into shadows in order to tell the story.

My bird travelogues are represented by a native species from an area I’ve traveled and the papers included reflect my experiences there.

My current series, “Character Studies”, are collages comprised of papers on which I have written letters to the subject using rubber stamps and handwriting. These images are the amalgam of outward appearance and inward introspection.

-Trudy Borenstein-Sugiura



Trudy Borenstein-Sugiura is an award-winning designer of fine jewelry and tabletop objects whose work is included in the Permanent Collection of the Smithsonian Institution at the Cooper-Hewitt Museum, and has been exhibited and sold in galleries, design stores and museums internationally. After a full and successful career in the jewelry industry, Trudy has returned to her fine art training to create art in its purest form. She is inspired by her current explorations; creating portraits out of the important documents of her subject’s lives. Carefully organizing and categorizing medical records, report cards, death certificates, maps and more, to construct likenesses that explore memory and reveal new perspectives. Through scrupulous arrangements and obsessive detail, she is telling stories; exploring the past and repurposing it for future reflection. In the past 2 years, her current work has been exhibited in galleries in New York City, Chicago, Denver, L.A. and the Hamptons.

The Shape of Color

The Arts Council of Princeton presents The Shape of Color: Photographs by Walter Frank in the Solley Lobby Gallery. Join us for an Opening Reception on Saturday, October 6 from 3-5pm.

 

“In 1970, I purchased a Honeywell Pentax 35m camera not long after arriving in San Francisco as a newly minted attorney. My sojourn in California lasted 4 years; Roughly 31 years later I finally bid farewell to my loyal friend and entered the digital age.

All the framed pictures in this exhibit were taken with various iterations of the Panasonic Lumix Digital Camera, its main virtues being a superb Leica lens and unobtrusive size that allowed me to take it anywhere and use it or not as I pleased. These images have not been photo-shopped.  The colors you see are what I saw or, more accurately, what the camera saw.

My father was a gifted commercial artist who, among other things, drew Captain Midnight and Gabby Hayes comics. I inherited quite literally not an iota of his talent. Even my stick figures draw puzzled looks. So photography for me has been the default option for expressing myself however indirectly in a visual manner.

I had originally thought of calling this exhibit, Things You Might Not Notice.  For me, the fun of photography is trying to see things from a slightly different angle. The camera’s great gift is its capacity to isolate and capture what you think you see. Sometimes the camera says, ‘What exactly were you thinking?’ Occasionally, however, it says, ‘Not bad.'”

-Walter Frank

 

[caption id="attachment_22363" align="aligncenter" width="381"] Photography by Walter Frank[/caption]

Thursday, October 11

Drawings by Mi Ju

The Arts Council of Princeton and the Princeton Public Library present a curated exhibition of paired poems and artwork. This exhibition demonstrates how the image and the written word can be in conversation with each other. Drawings by Brooklyn-based artist, Mi Ju. Poems by John Clare, Rita Dove, Pauline Johnson (Tekahionwake), and Dara-Lyn Shrager.

Mi Ju is an internationally exhibited artist who lives and works in New York City.

Out of Character

I have a lifelong love affair with paper and have saved, catalogued and hoarded report cards, postcards, travel brochures, invoices, documents, medical records and books of travels, important personal events and several generations of my family’s ephemera.

My investigations into portraiture through the use of original source documents and related material has its roots in the desire to record and capture time while exploring memory in order to establish identities and reveal new perspectives. Even as portraits typically evoke a likeness, filtered through personality or mood, they also form a historical record that tells an incomplete story. Documents are nonjudgmental and reflect many forgotten aspects of personal history as they relate to society, cultural practices and personal idiosyncrasies. They are evidence of the multiple aspects of a point in time; building blocks to the whole. The reuse of these precious papers is with the intent of repurposing them for future reflection. They become not just the surface of the portrait, but materialize as inherent elements of the narrative. Words, times and dates of particular importance blend into shadows in order to tell the story.

My bird travelogues are represented by a native species from an area I’ve traveled and the papers included reflect my experiences there.

My current series, “Character Studies”, are collages comprised of papers on which I have written letters to the subject using rubber stamps and handwriting. These images are the amalgam of outward appearance and inward introspection.

-Trudy Borenstein-Sugiura



Trudy Borenstein-Sugiura is an award-winning designer of fine jewelry and tabletop objects whose work is included in the Permanent Collection of the Smithsonian Institution at the Cooper-Hewitt Museum, and has been exhibited and sold in galleries, design stores and museums internationally. After a full and successful career in the jewelry industry, Trudy has returned to her fine art training to create art in its purest form. She is inspired by her current explorations; creating portraits out of the important documents of her subject’s lives. Carefully organizing and categorizing medical records, report cards, death certificates, maps and more, to construct likenesses that explore memory and reveal new perspectives. Through scrupulous arrangements and obsessive detail, she is telling stories; exploring the past and repurposing it for future reflection. In the past 2 years, her current work has been exhibited in galleries in New York City, Chicago, Denver, L.A. and the Hamptons.

The Shape of Color

The Arts Council of Princeton presents The Shape of Color: Photographs by Walter Frank in the Solley Lobby Gallery. Join us for an Opening Reception on Saturday, October 6 from 3-5pm.

 

“In 1970, I purchased a Honeywell Pentax 35m camera not long after arriving in San Francisco as a newly minted attorney. My sojourn in California lasted 4 years; Roughly 31 years later I finally bid farewell to my loyal friend and entered the digital age.

All the framed pictures in this exhibit were taken with various iterations of the Panasonic Lumix Digital Camera, its main virtues being a superb Leica lens and unobtrusive size that allowed me to take it anywhere and use it or not as I pleased. These images have not been photo-shopped.  The colors you see are what I saw or, more accurately, what the camera saw.

My father was a gifted commercial artist who, among other things, drew Captain Midnight and Gabby Hayes comics. I inherited quite literally not an iota of his talent. Even my stick figures draw puzzled looks. So photography for me has been the default option for expressing myself however indirectly in a visual manner.

I had originally thought of calling this exhibit, Things You Might Not Notice.  For me, the fun of photography is trying to see things from a slightly different angle. The camera’s great gift is its capacity to isolate and capture what you think you see. Sometimes the camera says, ‘What exactly were you thinking?’ Occasionally, however, it says, ‘Not bad.'”

-Walter Frank

 

[caption id="attachment_22363" align="aligncenter" width="381"] Photography by Walter Frank[/caption]