• Events & Performances
  • Exhibitions
  • Workshops
  • Community
  • Community Stage

Saturday, October 13

Gallery Talk: Colloquy

- Free and Open to the Public!

Join the Arts Council of Princeton for a Gallery Talk with Nancy Cohen and Anna Boothe, artists of Colloquy. The talk is immediately followed by an Opening Reception from 3-5pm.

Colloquy is a collaborative installation by Philadelphia and New York area sculptors Anna Boothe and Nancy Cohen. Since 2012, they have been collaborating on an evolving project entitled “Between Seeing and Knowing”. The first segment of the project, parts for which were fabricated during a Collaborative Residency at the Studio of the Corning Museum of Glass, culminated in a large-scale installation that was exhibited at Accola Griefen Gallery in Chelsea, NYC in 2013 and in part at the Philadelphia Airport in 2017-18.

Finding the Great Pumpkin

- Free and Open to the Public!

 

[caption id="attachment_22286" align="alignleft" width="300"] Get up and dance with Alex & the Kaleidoscope![/caption]

 

 

Join the Arts Council of Princeton at the Princeton Shopping Center for an afternoon of family-friendly fall fun! This event is free and open to the public.

Create artwork inspired by the season, enjoy face painting with Spirit Halloween, and get up and dance with Alex & the Kaleidoscope! Alex & the Kaleidoscope is an interactive music entertainment band, targeted for children 4-8 years old, that encourages and inspires kids to celebrate and learn through the power of songs, fun facts and adventures to interesting places around the world.

Have you ever wondered why pumpkins are orange? The answer is in their DNA! Visit Princeton University’s Graduate Molecular Biology Outreach Program’s table to learn all about DNA with their hands-on activity to purify pumpkin DNA! This activity is fun for all ages! Don’t miss out on your chance to learn about the blueprint of life and to take home your very own test tube of pumpkin DNA!

 

[caption id="attachment_22287" align="alignleft" width="300"] Fall-themed crafts for all ages[/caption]

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Thank you to co-sponsor EDENS/Princeton Shopping Center.

Opening Reception: Colloquy

- Free and Open to the Public!

Join the Arts Council of Princeton for the Opening Reception of Colloquy by Nancy Cohen and Anna Boothe. The Opening immediately follows a Gallery Talk from 2-3pm.

Colloquy is a collaborative installation by  sculptors Anna Boothe and Nancy Cohen.

Colloquy

Last year, in 2017, Anna Boothe and Nancy Cohen collaborated on a series of sculptures that were shown at the Philadelphia Art Alliance; the works shown owed a lot to the thangka, a type of Tibetan Buddhist painting that represents a Buddhist deity or an image taken from the Tibetan religious imaginary.  Buddhist imagery has been a part of American thinking and making for more than two generations now, so Boothe and Cohen belong to a well-established tradition in contemporary American art. Their work, a subtle combination of materials and ideas, feeds the notion of a dialogue–both between the two artists and between the artists and the world, the subjective laboratory that makes up their domain. Buddhist art tends to demonstrate the benefits of loss of self, while contemporary art is often about personal assertion. Trying to merge the two is not without its difficulties! The merger is made more complex by the fact of the two artists’ collaboration, which presupposes a shared esthetic and preference for materials, but this in fact may not always be so.

 

 

 

 

Between Seeing and Knowing
Glass, resin, metal, monofilament
Courtesy of the Philadelphia International Airport Art Program

 

 

Boothe and Cohen build subtle structures whose accumulated energies link their efforts to feeling and thought that last because of the well-constructed quality of their art. The large wall of imagery that constitutes Between Seeing and Knowing  (2017) offers mostly organic abstractions, but there are some mechanical-looking images as well–fragments of a divine machine! The randomness of the imagery attains a wholistic unity when looked at from a distance or over time. Boothe and Cohen are artists first and foremost; they have made it clear they are not religious seekers. But Buddhist principles can apply to their art: Buddhism is more about a process–an ongoing searching–than it is about achieving a specific religious insight, and the audience senses, on seeing this wall of discrete images, that the works are intended to be seen as artworks posessing a spiritual outlook. Petal Pose (2017) is overtly phallic–to the point of visual unease! It consists of a violently red tumescent head surrounded by a green stem and leaves. The image’s literalism disturbs a bit, but it also underscores the fact that the spirituality and natural imagery that Boothe and Cohen make use of can sustain very different points of view  (sometimes eroticism can replace piety!). Buddhism’s sensitivity toward nature has always been very high, and the two artists make it evidently clear in their work.

The exquisite sculpture Unseen/Unknown (2017) consists of a small, white lotus flower flanked on either side by brown leaves, beneath which we see the mixture of a drawing and a sculpture in a neutrally tan color. The recognition of unknowing is always a part of any religious doctrine, and the lotus flower, so central to Buddhist thought and devotion, maintains an air of mystery. This piece, like the rest of the works made by Boothe and Cohen, is exquisite in its facture–as a group, the discrete sculptures meld and offer something larger than a small conglomerate of individual pieces. Having seen a Buddhist shrine in the countryside in Korea a number of years ago, I can vouch for the overcrowding of the sacred space with repetitive imageries. So the large number of discrete objects in this show play a role in which the entirety of experience is meant to be acknowledged–in the powerful landscape of the show’s totality.

 

Shift
Glass, metal, handmade paper

 

 

There is a larger question to be asked: how is this work contemporary art? It is pretty clear that the abundant use of metaphor found in the works argue for a new way of seeing, just as the cumulative effect of the many small works demonstrates the artists’ sly awareness of the many’s ability to become one in a sleight of hand that can only be considered currently available. The spiritual aspect of this work is more complicated than it would seem–religion is what you make of it, and the terms of this body of works do tend to address the individual imagination rather than the group’s. Additionally, the artists have made it clear that while the thangka influences their formal approach, the tenets of Buddhism are not being assiduously addressed in their art. But that does not mean the individual works of art are lacking in sincerity. The major difference in the works encountered here is that they are abstract, while the imagery of Buddhism is a mixture of the figurative–images of the Buddha–and the abstract–the design of the mandala. Yet this is a time now when claims are being made for contemporary art that cannot be sustained–at least in a spiritual sense. Indeed, in this body of work, the thangka works more effectively as a formal principle than a theological one.

Permutation Drawing I (2017), is a very beautiful gray-and-white monoprint with graphic signs of natural forms that are arranged in curving rows. It rings changes on basic curvilinear shapes, establishing a visual harmony not too easily established in a culture where abstraction is well known. The charm of the work also is not truly in keeping with the rough materialism of much of today’s art. Pollination (2017), displayed as a table piece at the Philadelphia Art Alliance, erotically displays two phallic forms, which reach out toward each other. One comes from colored pieces of glass, while the other is part of a piece of transparent glass. For this writer, the pieces underscore the libidinous forms of nature. Desire and spiritual matters both come together in the show. In the long run, what is most important about this body of work is its collaborative manufacture, its spiritual insight, and its interpretation of another culture. These things indicate an openness toward culture and art that invests Boothe and Cohen’s work with real dignity and insight. We are living in a time when depth is missing from culture, but the artists here are offering exactly that. We must be grateful for their efforts.

 

Essay by Jonathan Goodman

 

Drawings by Mi Ju

The Arts Council of Princeton and the Princeton Public Library present a curated exhibition of paired poems and artwork. This exhibition demonstrates how the image and the written word can be in conversation with each other. Drawings by Brooklyn-based artist, Mi Ju. Poems by John Clare, Rita Dove, Pauline Johnson (Tekahionwake), and Dara-Lyn Shrager.

Mi Ju is an internationally exhibited artist who lives and works in New York City.

Out of Character

I have a lifelong love affair with paper and have saved, catalogued and hoarded report cards, postcards, travel brochures, invoices, documents, medical records and books of travels, important personal events and several generations of my family’s ephemera.

My investigations into portraiture through the use of original source documents and related material has its roots in the desire to record and capture time while exploring memory in order to establish identities and reveal new perspectives. Even as portraits typically evoke a likeness, filtered through personality or mood, they also form a historical record that tells an incomplete story. Documents are nonjudgmental and reflect many forgotten aspects of personal history as they relate to society, cultural practices and personal idiosyncrasies. They are evidence of the multiple aspects of a point in time; building blocks to the whole. The reuse of these precious papers is with the intent of repurposing them for future reflection. They become not just the surface of the portrait, but materialize as inherent elements of the narrative. Words, times and dates of particular importance blend into shadows in order to tell the story.

My bird travelogues are represented by a native species from an area I’ve traveled and the papers included reflect my experiences there.

My current series, “Character Studies”, are collages comprised of papers on which I have written letters to the subject using rubber stamps and handwriting. These images are the amalgam of outward appearance and inward introspection.

-Trudy Borenstein-Sugiura



Trudy Borenstein-Sugiura is an award-winning designer of fine jewelry and tabletop objects whose work is included in the Permanent Collection of the Smithsonian Institution at the Cooper-Hewitt Museum, and has been exhibited and sold in galleries, design stores and museums internationally. After a full and successful career in the jewelry industry, Trudy has returned to her fine art training to create art in its purest form. She is inspired by her current explorations; creating portraits out of the important documents of her subject’s lives. Carefully organizing and categorizing medical records, report cards, death certificates, maps and more, to construct likenesses that explore memory and reveal new perspectives. Through scrupulous arrangements and obsessive detail, she is telling stories; exploring the past and repurposing it for future reflection. In the past 2 years, her current work has been exhibited in galleries in New York City, Chicago, Denver, L.A. and the Hamptons.

Sculpture by Gyuri Hollosy


At a very young age, Gyuri Hollosy started his career in sculptured art and in the 1960’s, attended the Cleveland Institute of Art. Gaining an interest in sculptures, Gyuri began fusing materials together to create beautiful original sculpture artwork in the 1970’s. Gyuri’s artwork represents a philosophy, an emotion or a portrait of an influential figure or time period of our history.

As a bronze sculpture artist, Gyuri has been able to transform his visions into reality and create one-of-a-kind pieces of artwork. There is a detailed process involved in designing and fabricating his work; the end result is very appealing to the eye. He uses a multitude of materials and techniques to sculpt 3-dimensional figures.

You can find his work in various locations around the country. He has been recognized for his talent and is the recipient of many prestigious awards. Gyuri expanded his artistic talent and created original artwork oil paintings in addition to his sculptures. Much of what Gyuri has to offer is based upon his new language of expression through bodies that were fragmented and partial.

Gyuri hopes that you will be intrigued by the elements of strength and fragility revealed by his figures. For an in-depth insight into Gyuri Hollosy’s artistic background, you may view his biography page and also take a look at his collections page. Gyuri is available by email or telephone number, which are both listed on his contact page. Both of Gyuri’s original sculptor artwork and original artwork oil paintings are viewable on his gallery page.

The Shape of Color

The Arts Council of Princeton presents The Shape of Color: Photographs by Walter Frank in the Solley Lobby Gallery. Join us for an Opening Reception on Saturday, October 6 from 3-5pm.

 

“In 1970, I purchased a Honeywell Pentax 35m camera not long after arriving in San Francisco as a newly minted attorney. My sojourn in California lasted 4 years; Roughly 31 years later I finally bid farewell to my loyal friend and entered the digital age.

All the framed pictures in this exhibit were taken with various iterations of the Panasonic Lumix Digital Camera, its main virtues being a superb Leica lens and unobtrusive size that allowed me to take it anywhere and use it or not as I pleased. These images have not been photo-shopped.  The colors you see are what I saw or, more accurately, what the camera saw.

My father was a gifted commercial artist who, among other things, drew Captain Midnight and Gabby Hayes comics. I inherited quite literally not an iota of his talent. Even my stick figures draw puzzled looks. So photography for me has been the default option for expressing myself however indirectly in a visual manner.

I had originally thought of calling this exhibit, Things You Might Not Notice.  For me, the fun of photography is trying to see things from a slightly different angle. The camera’s great gift is its capacity to isolate and capture what you think you see. Sometimes the camera says, ‘What exactly were you thinking?’ Occasionally, however, it says, ‘Not bad.'”

-Walter Frank

 

[caption id="attachment_22363" align="aligncenter" width="381"] Photography by Walter Frank[/caption]

Sunday, October 14

Colloquy

Last year, in 2017, Anna Boothe and Nancy Cohen collaborated on a series of sculptures that were shown at the Philadelphia Art Alliance; the works shown owed a lot to the thangka, a type of Tibetan Buddhist painting that represents a Buddhist deity or an image taken from the Tibetan religious imaginary.  Buddhist imagery has been a part of American thinking and making for more than two generations now, so Boothe and Cohen belong to a well-established tradition in contemporary American art. Their work, a subtle combination of materials and ideas, feeds the notion of a dialogue–both between the two artists and between the artists and the world, the subjective laboratory that makes up their domain. Buddhist art tends to demonstrate the benefits of loss of self, while contemporary art is often about personal assertion. Trying to merge the two is not without its difficulties! The merger is made more complex by the fact of the two artists’ collaboration, which presupposes a shared esthetic and preference for materials, but this in fact may not always be so.

 

 

 

 

Between Seeing and Knowing
Glass, resin, metal, monofilament
Courtesy of the Philadelphia International Airport Art Program

 

 

Boothe and Cohen build subtle structures whose accumulated energies link their efforts to feeling and thought that last because of the well-constructed quality of their art. The large wall of imagery that constitutes Between Seeing and Knowing  (2017) offers mostly organic abstractions, but there are some mechanical-looking images as well–fragments of a divine machine! The randomness of the imagery attains a wholistic unity when looked at from a distance or over time. Boothe and Cohen are artists first and foremost; they have made it clear they are not religious seekers. But Buddhist principles can apply to their art: Buddhism is more about a process–an ongoing searching–than it is about achieving a specific religious insight, and the audience senses, on seeing this wall of discrete images, that the works are intended to be seen as artworks posessing a spiritual outlook. Petal Pose (2017) is overtly phallic–to the point of visual unease! It consists of a violently red tumescent head surrounded by a green stem and leaves. The image’s literalism disturbs a bit, but it also underscores the fact that the spirituality and natural imagery that Boothe and Cohen make use of can sustain very different points of view  (sometimes eroticism can replace piety!). Buddhism’s sensitivity toward nature has always been very high, and the two artists make it evidently clear in their work.

The exquisite sculpture Unseen/Unknown (2017) consists of a small, white lotus flower flanked on either side by brown leaves, beneath which we see the mixture of a drawing and a sculpture in a neutrally tan color. The recognition of unknowing is always a part of any religious doctrine, and the lotus flower, so central to Buddhist thought and devotion, maintains an air of mystery. This piece, like the rest of the works made by Boothe and Cohen, is exquisite in its facture–as a group, the discrete sculptures meld and offer something larger than a small conglomerate of individual pieces. Having seen a Buddhist shrine in the countryside in Korea a number of years ago, I can vouch for the overcrowding of the sacred space with repetitive imageries. So the large number of discrete objects in this show play a role in which the entirety of experience is meant to be acknowledged–in the powerful landscape of the show’s totality.

 

Shift
Glass, metal, handmade paper

 

 

There is a larger question to be asked: how is this work contemporary art? It is pretty clear that the abundant use of metaphor found in the works argue for a new way of seeing, just as the cumulative effect of the many small works demonstrates the artists’ sly awareness of the many’s ability to become one in a sleight of hand that can only be considered currently available. The spiritual aspect of this work is more complicated than it would seem–religion is what you make of it, and the terms of this body of works do tend to address the individual imagination rather than the group’s. Additionally, the artists have made it clear that while the thangka influences their formal approach, the tenets of Buddhism are not being assiduously addressed in their art. But that does not mean the individual works of art are lacking in sincerity. The major difference in the works encountered here is that they are abstract, while the imagery of Buddhism is a mixture of the figurative–images of the Buddha–and the abstract–the design of the mandala. Yet this is a time now when claims are being made for contemporary art that cannot be sustained–at least in a spiritual sense. Indeed, in this body of work, the thangka works more effectively as a formal principle than a theological one.

Permutation Drawing I (2017), is a very beautiful gray-and-white monoprint with graphic signs of natural forms that are arranged in curving rows. It rings changes on basic curvilinear shapes, establishing a visual harmony not too easily established in a culture where abstraction is well known. The charm of the work also is not truly in keeping with the rough materialism of much of today’s art. Pollination (2017), displayed as a table piece at the Philadelphia Art Alliance, erotically displays two phallic forms, which reach out toward each other. One comes from colored pieces of glass, while the other is part of a piece of transparent glass. For this writer, the pieces underscore the libidinous forms of nature. Desire and spiritual matters both come together in the show. In the long run, what is most important about this body of work is its collaborative manufacture, its spiritual insight, and its interpretation of another culture. These things indicate an openness toward culture and art that invests Boothe and Cohen’s work with real dignity and insight. We are living in a time when depth is missing from culture, but the artists here are offering exactly that. We must be grateful for their efforts.

 

Essay by Jonathan Goodman

 

Drawings by Mi Ju

The Arts Council of Princeton and the Princeton Public Library present a curated exhibition of paired poems and artwork. This exhibition demonstrates how the image and the written word can be in conversation with each other. Drawings by Brooklyn-based artist, Mi Ju. Poems by John Clare, Rita Dove, Pauline Johnson (Tekahionwake), and Dara-Lyn Shrager.

Mi Ju is an internationally exhibited artist who lives and works in New York City.

Out of Character

I have a lifelong love affair with paper and have saved, catalogued and hoarded report cards, postcards, travel brochures, invoices, documents, medical records and books of travels, important personal events and several generations of my family’s ephemera.

My investigations into portraiture through the use of original source documents and related material has its roots in the desire to record and capture time while exploring memory in order to establish identities and reveal new perspectives. Even as portraits typically evoke a likeness, filtered through personality or mood, they also form a historical record that tells an incomplete story. Documents are nonjudgmental and reflect many forgotten aspects of personal history as they relate to society, cultural practices and personal idiosyncrasies. They are evidence of the multiple aspects of a point in time; building blocks to the whole. The reuse of these precious papers is with the intent of repurposing them for future reflection. They become not just the surface of the portrait, but materialize as inherent elements of the narrative. Words, times and dates of particular importance blend into shadows in order to tell the story.

My bird travelogues are represented by a native species from an area I’ve traveled and the papers included reflect my experiences there.

My current series, “Character Studies”, are collages comprised of papers on which I have written letters to the subject using rubber stamps and handwriting. These images are the amalgam of outward appearance and inward introspection.

-Trudy Borenstein-Sugiura



Trudy Borenstein-Sugiura is an award-winning designer of fine jewelry and tabletop objects whose work is included in the Permanent Collection of the Smithsonian Institution at the Cooper-Hewitt Museum, and has been exhibited and sold in galleries, design stores and museums internationally. After a full and successful career in the jewelry industry, Trudy has returned to her fine art training to create art in its purest form. She is inspired by her current explorations; creating portraits out of the important documents of her subject’s lives. Carefully organizing and categorizing medical records, report cards, death certificates, maps and more, to construct likenesses that explore memory and reveal new perspectives. Through scrupulous arrangements and obsessive detail, she is telling stories; exploring the past and repurposing it for future reflection. In the past 2 years, her current work has been exhibited in galleries in New York City, Chicago, Denver, L.A. and the Hamptons.

Sculpture by Gyuri Hollosy


At a very young age, Gyuri Hollosy started his career in sculptured art and in the 1960’s, attended the Cleveland Institute of Art. Gaining an interest in sculptures, Gyuri began fusing materials together to create beautiful original sculpture artwork in the 1970’s. Gyuri’s artwork represents a philosophy, an emotion or a portrait of an influential figure or time period of our history.

As a bronze sculpture artist, Gyuri has been able to transform his visions into reality and create one-of-a-kind pieces of artwork. There is a detailed process involved in designing and fabricating his work; the end result is very appealing to the eye. He uses a multitude of materials and techniques to sculpt 3-dimensional figures.

You can find his work in various locations around the country. He has been recognized for his talent and is the recipient of many prestigious awards. Gyuri expanded his artistic talent and created original artwork oil paintings in addition to his sculptures. Much of what Gyuri has to offer is based upon his new language of expression through bodies that were fragmented and partial.

Gyuri hopes that you will be intrigued by the elements of strength and fragility revealed by his figures. For an in-depth insight into Gyuri Hollosy’s artistic background, you may view his biography page and also take a look at his collections page. Gyuri is available by email or telephone number, which are both listed on his contact page. Both of Gyuri’s original sculptor artwork and original artwork oil paintings are viewable on his gallery page.

The Shape of Color

The Arts Council of Princeton presents The Shape of Color: Photographs by Walter Frank in the Solley Lobby Gallery. Join us for an Opening Reception on Saturday, October 6 from 3-5pm.

 

“In 1970, I purchased a Honeywell Pentax 35m camera not long after arriving in San Francisco as a newly minted attorney. My sojourn in California lasted 4 years; Roughly 31 years later I finally bid farewell to my loyal friend and entered the digital age.

All the framed pictures in this exhibit were taken with various iterations of the Panasonic Lumix Digital Camera, its main virtues being a superb Leica lens and unobtrusive size that allowed me to take it anywhere and use it or not as I pleased. These images have not been photo-shopped.  The colors you see are what I saw or, more accurately, what the camera saw.

My father was a gifted commercial artist who, among other things, drew Captain Midnight and Gabby Hayes comics. I inherited quite literally not an iota of his talent. Even my stick figures draw puzzled looks. So photography for me has been the default option for expressing myself however indirectly in a visual manner.

I had originally thought of calling this exhibit, Things You Might Not Notice.  For me, the fun of photography is trying to see things from a slightly different angle. The camera’s great gift is its capacity to isolate and capture what you think you see. Sometimes the camera says, ‘What exactly were you thinking?’ Occasionally, however, it says, ‘Not bad.'”

-Walter Frank

 

[caption id="attachment_22363" align="aligncenter" width="381"] Photography by Walter Frank[/caption]

Monday, October 15

Colloquy

Last year, in 2017, Anna Boothe and Nancy Cohen collaborated on a series of sculptures that were shown at the Philadelphia Art Alliance; the works shown owed a lot to the thangka, a type of Tibetan Buddhist painting that represents a Buddhist deity or an image taken from the Tibetan religious imaginary.  Buddhist imagery has been a part of American thinking and making for more than two generations now, so Boothe and Cohen belong to a well-established tradition in contemporary American art. Their work, a subtle combination of materials and ideas, feeds the notion of a dialogue–both between the two artists and between the artists and the world, the subjective laboratory that makes up their domain. Buddhist art tends to demonstrate the benefits of loss of self, while contemporary art is often about personal assertion. Trying to merge the two is not without its difficulties! The merger is made more complex by the fact of the two artists’ collaboration, which presupposes a shared esthetic and preference for materials, but this in fact may not always be so.

 

 

 

 

Between Seeing and Knowing
Glass, resin, metal, monofilament
Courtesy of the Philadelphia International Airport Art Program

 

 

Boothe and Cohen build subtle structures whose accumulated energies link their efforts to feeling and thought that last because of the well-constructed quality of their art. The large wall of imagery that constitutes Between Seeing and Knowing  (2017) offers mostly organic abstractions, but there are some mechanical-looking images as well–fragments of a divine machine! The randomness of the imagery attains a wholistic unity when looked at from a distance or over time. Boothe and Cohen are artists first and foremost; they have made it clear they are not religious seekers. But Buddhist principles can apply to their art: Buddhism is more about a process–an ongoing searching–than it is about achieving a specific religious insight, and the audience senses, on seeing this wall of discrete images, that the works are intended to be seen as artworks posessing a spiritual outlook. Petal Pose (2017) is overtly phallic–to the point of visual unease! It consists of a violently red tumescent head surrounded by a green stem and leaves. The image’s literalism disturbs a bit, but it also underscores the fact that the spirituality and natural imagery that Boothe and Cohen make use of can sustain very different points of view  (sometimes eroticism can replace piety!). Buddhism’s sensitivity toward nature has always been very high, and the two artists make it evidently clear in their work.

The exquisite sculpture Unseen/Unknown (2017) consists of a small, white lotus flower flanked on either side by brown leaves, beneath which we see the mixture of a drawing and a sculpture in a neutrally tan color. The recognition of unknowing is always a part of any religious doctrine, and the lotus flower, so central to Buddhist thought and devotion, maintains an air of mystery. This piece, like the rest of the works made by Boothe and Cohen, is exquisite in its facture–as a group, the discrete sculptures meld and offer something larger than a small conglomerate of individual pieces. Having seen a Buddhist shrine in the countryside in Korea a number of years ago, I can vouch for the overcrowding of the sacred space with repetitive imageries. So the large number of discrete objects in this show play a role in which the entirety of experience is meant to be acknowledged–in the powerful landscape of the show’s totality.

 

Shift
Glass, metal, handmade paper

 

 

There is a larger question to be asked: how is this work contemporary art? It is pretty clear that the abundant use of metaphor found in the works argue for a new way of seeing, just as the cumulative effect of the many small works demonstrates the artists’ sly awareness of the many’s ability to become one in a sleight of hand that can only be considered currently available. The spiritual aspect of this work is more complicated than it would seem–religion is what you make of it, and the terms of this body of works do tend to address the individual imagination rather than the group’s. Additionally, the artists have made it clear that while the thangka influences their formal approach, the tenets of Buddhism are not being assiduously addressed in their art. But that does not mean the individual works of art are lacking in sincerity. The major difference in the works encountered here is that they are abstract, while the imagery of Buddhism is a mixture of the figurative–images of the Buddha–and the abstract–the design of the mandala. Yet this is a time now when claims are being made for contemporary art that cannot be sustained–at least in a spiritual sense. Indeed, in this body of work, the thangka works more effectively as a formal principle than a theological one.

Permutation Drawing I (2017), is a very beautiful gray-and-white monoprint with graphic signs of natural forms that are arranged in curving rows. It rings changes on basic curvilinear shapes, establishing a visual harmony not too easily established in a culture where abstraction is well known. The charm of the work also is not truly in keeping with the rough materialism of much of today’s art. Pollination (2017), displayed as a table piece at the Philadelphia Art Alliance, erotically displays two phallic forms, which reach out toward each other. One comes from colored pieces of glass, while the other is part of a piece of transparent glass. For this writer, the pieces underscore the libidinous forms of nature. Desire and spiritual matters both come together in the show. In the long run, what is most important about this body of work is its collaborative manufacture, its spiritual insight, and its interpretation of another culture. These things indicate an openness toward culture and art that invests Boothe and Cohen’s work with real dignity and insight. We are living in a time when depth is missing from culture, but the artists here are offering exactly that. We must be grateful for their efforts.

 

Essay by Jonathan Goodman

 

Drawings by Mi Ju

The Arts Council of Princeton and the Princeton Public Library present a curated exhibition of paired poems and artwork. This exhibition demonstrates how the image and the written word can be in conversation with each other. Drawings by Brooklyn-based artist, Mi Ju. Poems by John Clare, Rita Dove, Pauline Johnson (Tekahionwake), and Dara-Lyn Shrager.

Mi Ju is an internationally exhibited artist who lives and works in New York City.

Out of Character

I have a lifelong love affair with paper and have saved, catalogued and hoarded report cards, postcards, travel brochures, invoices, documents, medical records and books of travels, important personal events and several generations of my family’s ephemera.

My investigations into portraiture through the use of original source documents and related material has its roots in the desire to record and capture time while exploring memory in order to establish identities and reveal new perspectives. Even as portraits typically evoke a likeness, filtered through personality or mood, they also form a historical record that tells an incomplete story. Documents are nonjudgmental and reflect many forgotten aspects of personal history as they relate to society, cultural practices and personal idiosyncrasies. They are evidence of the multiple aspects of a point in time; building blocks to the whole. The reuse of these precious papers is with the intent of repurposing them for future reflection. They become not just the surface of the portrait, but materialize as inherent elements of the narrative. Words, times and dates of particular importance blend into shadows in order to tell the story.

My bird travelogues are represented by a native species from an area I’ve traveled and the papers included reflect my experiences there.

My current series, “Character Studies”, are collages comprised of papers on which I have written letters to the subject using rubber stamps and handwriting. These images are the amalgam of outward appearance and inward introspection.

-Trudy Borenstein-Sugiura



Trudy Borenstein-Sugiura is an award-winning designer of fine jewelry and tabletop objects whose work is included in the Permanent Collection of the Smithsonian Institution at the Cooper-Hewitt Museum, and has been exhibited and sold in galleries, design stores and museums internationally. After a full and successful career in the jewelry industry, Trudy has returned to her fine art training to create art in its purest form. She is inspired by her current explorations; creating portraits out of the important documents of her subject’s lives. Carefully organizing and categorizing medical records, report cards, death certificates, maps and more, to construct likenesses that explore memory and reveal new perspectives. Through scrupulous arrangements and obsessive detail, she is telling stories; exploring the past and repurposing it for future reflection. In the past 2 years, her current work has been exhibited in galleries in New York City, Chicago, Denver, L.A. and the Hamptons.

Sculpture by Gyuri Hollosy


At a very young age, Gyuri Hollosy started his career in sculptured art and in the 1960’s, attended the Cleveland Institute of Art. Gaining an interest in sculptures, Gyuri began fusing materials together to create beautiful original sculpture artwork in the 1970’s. Gyuri’s artwork represents a philosophy, an emotion or a portrait of an influential figure or time period of our history.

As a bronze sculpture artist, Gyuri has been able to transform his visions into reality and create one-of-a-kind pieces of artwork. There is a detailed process involved in designing and fabricating his work; the end result is very appealing to the eye. He uses a multitude of materials and techniques to sculpt 3-dimensional figures.

You can find his work in various locations around the country. He has been recognized for his talent and is the recipient of many prestigious awards. Gyuri expanded his artistic talent and created original artwork oil paintings in addition to his sculptures. Much of what Gyuri has to offer is based upon his new language of expression through bodies that were fragmented and partial.

Gyuri hopes that you will be intrigued by the elements of strength and fragility revealed by his figures. For an in-depth insight into Gyuri Hollosy’s artistic background, you may view his biography page and also take a look at his collections page. Gyuri is available by email or telephone number, which are both listed on his contact page. Both of Gyuri’s original sculptor artwork and original artwork oil paintings are viewable on his gallery page.

The Shape of Color

The Arts Council of Princeton presents The Shape of Color: Photographs by Walter Frank in the Solley Lobby Gallery. Join us for an Opening Reception on Saturday, October 6 from 3-5pm.

 

“In 1970, I purchased a Honeywell Pentax 35m camera not long after arriving in San Francisco as a newly minted attorney. My sojourn in California lasted 4 years; Roughly 31 years later I finally bid farewell to my loyal friend and entered the digital age.

All the framed pictures in this exhibit were taken with various iterations of the Panasonic Lumix Digital Camera, its main virtues being a superb Leica lens and unobtrusive size that allowed me to take it anywhere and use it or not as I pleased. These images have not been photo-shopped.  The colors you see are what I saw or, more accurately, what the camera saw.

My father was a gifted commercial artist who, among other things, drew Captain Midnight and Gabby Hayes comics. I inherited quite literally not an iota of his talent. Even my stick figures draw puzzled looks. So photography for me has been the default option for expressing myself however indirectly in a visual manner.

I had originally thought of calling this exhibit, Things You Might Not Notice.  For me, the fun of photography is trying to see things from a slightly different angle. The camera’s great gift is its capacity to isolate and capture what you think you see. Sometimes the camera says, ‘What exactly were you thinking?’ Occasionally, however, it says, ‘Not bad.'”

-Walter Frank

 

[caption id="attachment_22363" align="aligncenter" width="381"] Photography by Walter Frank[/caption]

Tuesday, October 16

Colloquy

Last year, in 2017, Anna Boothe and Nancy Cohen collaborated on a series of sculptures that were shown at the Philadelphia Art Alliance; the works shown owed a lot to the thangka, a type of Tibetan Buddhist painting that represents a Buddhist deity or an image taken from the Tibetan religious imaginary.  Buddhist imagery has been a part of American thinking and making for more than two generations now, so Boothe and Cohen belong to a well-established tradition in contemporary American art. Their work, a subtle combination of materials and ideas, feeds the notion of a dialogue–both between the two artists and between the artists and the world, the subjective laboratory that makes up their domain. Buddhist art tends to demonstrate the benefits of loss of self, while contemporary art is often about personal assertion. Trying to merge the two is not without its difficulties! The merger is made more complex by the fact of the two artists’ collaboration, which presupposes a shared esthetic and preference for materials, but this in fact may not always be so.

 

 

 

 

Between Seeing and Knowing
Glass, resin, metal, monofilament
Courtesy of the Philadelphia International Airport Art Program

 

 

Boothe and Cohen build subtle structures whose accumulated energies link their efforts to feeling and thought that last because of the well-constructed quality of their art. The large wall of imagery that constitutes Between Seeing and Knowing  (2017) offers mostly organic abstractions, but there are some mechanical-looking images as well–fragments of a divine machine! The randomness of the imagery attains a wholistic unity when looked at from a distance or over time. Boothe and Cohen are artists first and foremost; they have made it clear they are not religious seekers. But Buddhist principles can apply to their art: Buddhism is more about a process–an ongoing searching–than it is about achieving a specific religious insight, and the audience senses, on seeing this wall of discrete images, that the works are intended to be seen as artworks posessing a spiritual outlook. Petal Pose (2017) is overtly phallic–to the point of visual unease! It consists of a violently red tumescent head surrounded by a green stem and leaves. The image’s literalism disturbs a bit, but it also underscores the fact that the spirituality and natural imagery that Boothe and Cohen make use of can sustain very different points of view  (sometimes eroticism can replace piety!). Buddhism’s sensitivity toward nature has always been very high, and the two artists make it evidently clear in their work.

The exquisite sculpture Unseen/Unknown (2017) consists of a small, white lotus flower flanked on either side by brown leaves, beneath which we see the mixture of a drawing and a sculpture in a neutrally tan color. The recognition of unknowing is always a part of any religious doctrine, and the lotus flower, so central to Buddhist thought and devotion, maintains an air of mystery. This piece, like the rest of the works made by Boothe and Cohen, is exquisite in its facture–as a group, the discrete sculptures meld and offer something larger than a small conglomerate of individual pieces. Having seen a Buddhist shrine in the countryside in Korea a number of years ago, I can vouch for the overcrowding of the sacred space with repetitive imageries. So the large number of discrete objects in this show play a role in which the entirety of experience is meant to be acknowledged–in the powerful landscape of the show’s totality.

 

Shift
Glass, metal, handmade paper

 

 

There is a larger question to be asked: how is this work contemporary art? It is pretty clear that the abundant use of metaphor found in the works argue for a new way of seeing, just as the cumulative effect of the many small works demonstrates the artists’ sly awareness of the many’s ability to become one in a sleight of hand that can only be considered currently available. The spiritual aspect of this work is more complicated than it would seem–religion is what you make of it, and the terms of this body of works do tend to address the individual imagination rather than the group’s. Additionally, the artists have made it clear that while the thangka influences their formal approach, the tenets of Buddhism are not being assiduously addressed in their art. But that does not mean the individual works of art are lacking in sincerity. The major difference in the works encountered here is that they are abstract, while the imagery of Buddhism is a mixture of the figurative–images of the Buddha–and the abstract–the design of the mandala. Yet this is a time now when claims are being made for contemporary art that cannot be sustained–at least in a spiritual sense. Indeed, in this body of work, the thangka works more effectively as a formal principle than a theological one.

Permutation Drawing I (2017), is a very beautiful gray-and-white monoprint with graphic signs of natural forms that are arranged in curving rows. It rings changes on basic curvilinear shapes, establishing a visual harmony not too easily established in a culture where abstraction is well known. The charm of the work also is not truly in keeping with the rough materialism of much of today’s art. Pollination (2017), displayed as a table piece at the Philadelphia Art Alliance, erotically displays two phallic forms, which reach out toward each other. One comes from colored pieces of glass, while the other is part of a piece of transparent glass. For this writer, the pieces underscore the libidinous forms of nature. Desire and spiritual matters both come together in the show. In the long run, what is most important about this body of work is its collaborative manufacture, its spiritual insight, and its interpretation of another culture. These things indicate an openness toward culture and art that invests Boothe and Cohen’s work with real dignity and insight. We are living in a time when depth is missing from culture, but the artists here are offering exactly that. We must be grateful for their efforts.

 

Essay by Jonathan Goodman

 

Drawings by Mi Ju

The Arts Council of Princeton and the Princeton Public Library present a curated exhibition of paired poems and artwork. This exhibition demonstrates how the image and the written word can be in conversation with each other. Drawings by Brooklyn-based artist, Mi Ju. Poems by John Clare, Rita Dove, Pauline Johnson (Tekahionwake), and Dara-Lyn Shrager.

Mi Ju is an internationally exhibited artist who lives and works in New York City.

Out of Character

I have a lifelong love affair with paper and have saved, catalogued and hoarded report cards, postcards, travel brochures, invoices, documents, medical records and books of travels, important personal events and several generations of my family’s ephemera.

My investigations into portraiture through the use of original source documents and related material has its roots in the desire to record and capture time while exploring memory in order to establish identities and reveal new perspectives. Even as portraits typically evoke a likeness, filtered through personality or mood, they also form a historical record that tells an incomplete story. Documents are nonjudgmental and reflect many forgotten aspects of personal history as they relate to society, cultural practices and personal idiosyncrasies. They are evidence of the multiple aspects of a point in time; building blocks to the whole. The reuse of these precious papers is with the intent of repurposing them for future reflection. They become not just the surface of the portrait, but materialize as inherent elements of the narrative. Words, times and dates of particular importance blend into shadows in order to tell the story.

My bird travelogues are represented by a native species from an area I’ve traveled and the papers included reflect my experiences there.

My current series, “Character Studies”, are collages comprised of papers on which I have written letters to the subject using rubber stamps and handwriting. These images are the amalgam of outward appearance and inward introspection.

-Trudy Borenstein-Sugiura



Trudy Borenstein-Sugiura is an award-winning designer of fine jewelry and tabletop objects whose work is included in the Permanent Collection of the Smithsonian Institution at the Cooper-Hewitt Museum, and has been exhibited and sold in galleries, design stores and museums internationally. After a full and successful career in the jewelry industry, Trudy has returned to her fine art training to create art in its purest form. She is inspired by her current explorations; creating portraits out of the important documents of her subject’s lives. Carefully organizing and categorizing medical records, report cards, death certificates, maps and more, to construct likenesses that explore memory and reveal new perspectives. Through scrupulous arrangements and obsessive detail, she is telling stories; exploring the past and repurposing it for future reflection. In the past 2 years, her current work has been exhibited in galleries in New York City, Chicago, Denver, L.A. and the Hamptons.

Sculpture by Gyuri Hollosy


At a very young age, Gyuri Hollosy started his career in sculptured art and in the 1960’s, attended the Cleveland Institute of Art. Gaining an interest in sculptures, Gyuri began fusing materials together to create beautiful original sculpture artwork in the 1970’s. Gyuri’s artwork represents a philosophy, an emotion or a portrait of an influential figure or time period of our history.

As a bronze sculpture artist, Gyuri has been able to transform his visions into reality and create one-of-a-kind pieces of artwork. There is a detailed process involved in designing and fabricating his work; the end result is very appealing to the eye. He uses a multitude of materials and techniques to sculpt 3-dimensional figures.

You can find his work in various locations around the country. He has been recognized for his talent and is the recipient of many prestigious awards. Gyuri expanded his artistic talent and created original artwork oil paintings in addition to his sculptures. Much of what Gyuri has to offer is based upon his new language of expression through bodies that were fragmented and partial.

Gyuri hopes that you will be intrigued by the elements of strength and fragility revealed by his figures. For an in-depth insight into Gyuri Hollosy’s artistic background, you may view his biography page and also take a look at his collections page. Gyuri is available by email or telephone number, which are both listed on his contact page. Both of Gyuri’s original sculptor artwork and original artwork oil paintings are viewable on his gallery page.

The Shape of Color

The Arts Council of Princeton presents The Shape of Color: Photographs by Walter Frank in the Solley Lobby Gallery. Join us for an Opening Reception on Saturday, October 6 from 3-5pm.

 

“In 1970, I purchased a Honeywell Pentax 35m camera not long after arriving in San Francisco as a newly minted attorney. My sojourn in California lasted 4 years; Roughly 31 years later I finally bid farewell to my loyal friend and entered the digital age.

All the framed pictures in this exhibit were taken with various iterations of the Panasonic Lumix Digital Camera, its main virtues being a superb Leica lens and unobtrusive size that allowed me to take it anywhere and use it or not as I pleased. These images have not been photo-shopped.  The colors you see are what I saw or, more accurately, what the camera saw.

My father was a gifted commercial artist who, among other things, drew Captain Midnight and Gabby Hayes comics. I inherited quite literally not an iota of his talent. Even my stick figures draw puzzled looks. So photography for me has been the default option for expressing myself however indirectly in a visual manner.

I had originally thought of calling this exhibit, Things You Might Not Notice.  For me, the fun of photography is trying to see things from a slightly different angle. The camera’s great gift is its capacity to isolate and capture what you think you see. Sometimes the camera says, ‘What exactly were you thinking?’ Occasionally, however, it says, ‘Not bad.'”

-Walter Frank

 

[caption id="attachment_22363" align="aligncenter" width="381"] Photography by Walter Frank[/caption]

Wednesday, October 17

Colloquy

Last year, in 2017, Anna Boothe and Nancy Cohen collaborated on a series of sculptures that were shown at the Philadelphia Art Alliance; the works shown owed a lot to the thangka, a type of Tibetan Buddhist painting that represents a Buddhist deity or an image taken from the Tibetan religious imaginary.  Buddhist imagery has been a part of American thinking and making for more than two generations now, so Boothe and Cohen belong to a well-established tradition in contemporary American art. Their work, a subtle combination of materials and ideas, feeds the notion of a dialogue–both between the two artists and between the artists and the world, the subjective laboratory that makes up their domain. Buddhist art tends to demonstrate the benefits of loss of self, while contemporary art is often about personal assertion. Trying to merge the two is not without its difficulties! The merger is made more complex by the fact of the two artists’ collaboration, which presupposes a shared esthetic and preference for materials, but this in fact may not always be so.

 

 

 

 

Between Seeing and Knowing
Glass, resin, metal, monofilament
Courtesy of the Philadelphia International Airport Art Program

 

 

Boothe and Cohen build subtle structures whose accumulated energies link their efforts to feeling and thought that last because of the well-constructed quality of their art. The large wall of imagery that constitutes Between Seeing and Knowing  (2017) offers mostly organic abstractions, but there are some mechanical-looking images as well–fragments of a divine machine! The randomness of the imagery attains a wholistic unity when looked at from a distance or over time. Boothe and Cohen are artists first and foremost; they have made it clear they are not religious seekers. But Buddhist principles can apply to their art: Buddhism is more about a process–an ongoing searching–than it is about achieving a specific religious insight, and the audience senses, on seeing this wall of discrete images, that the works are intended to be seen as artworks posessing a spiritual outlook. Petal Pose (2017) is overtly phallic–to the point of visual unease! It consists of a violently red tumescent head surrounded by a green stem and leaves. The image’s literalism disturbs a bit, but it also underscores the fact that the spirituality and natural imagery that Boothe and Cohen make use of can sustain very different points of view  (sometimes eroticism can replace piety!). Buddhism’s sensitivity toward nature has always been very high, and the two artists make it evidently clear in their work.

The exquisite sculpture Unseen/Unknown (2017) consists of a small, white lotus flower flanked on either side by brown leaves, beneath which we see the mixture of a drawing and a sculpture in a neutrally tan color. The recognition of unknowing is always a part of any religious doctrine, and the lotus flower, so central to Buddhist thought and devotion, maintains an air of mystery. This piece, like the rest of the works made by Boothe and Cohen, is exquisite in its facture–as a group, the discrete sculptures meld and offer something larger than a small conglomerate of individual pieces. Having seen a Buddhist shrine in the countryside in Korea a number of years ago, I can vouch for the overcrowding of the sacred space with repetitive imageries. So the large number of discrete objects in this show play a role in which the entirety of experience is meant to be acknowledged–in the powerful landscape of the show’s totality.

 

Shift
Glass, metal, handmade paper

 

 

There is a larger question to be asked: how is this work contemporary art? It is pretty clear that the abundant use of metaphor found in the works argue for a new way of seeing, just as the cumulative effect of the many small works demonstrates the artists’ sly awareness of the many’s ability to become one in a sleight of hand that can only be considered currently available. The spiritual aspect of this work is more complicated than it would seem–religion is what you make of it, and the terms of this body of works do tend to address the individual imagination rather than the group’s. Additionally, the artists have made it clear that while the thangka influences their formal approach, the tenets of Buddhism are not being assiduously addressed in their art. But that does not mean the individual works of art are lacking in sincerity. The major difference in the works encountered here is that they are abstract, while the imagery of Buddhism is a mixture of the figurative–images of the Buddha–and the abstract–the design of the mandala. Yet this is a time now when claims are being made for contemporary art that cannot be sustained–at least in a spiritual sense. Indeed, in this body of work, the thangka works more effectively as a formal principle than a theological one.

Permutation Drawing I (2017), is a very beautiful gray-and-white monoprint with graphic signs of natural forms that are arranged in curving rows. It rings changes on basic curvilinear shapes, establishing a visual harmony not too easily established in a culture where abstraction is well known. The charm of the work also is not truly in keeping with the rough materialism of much of today’s art. Pollination (2017), displayed as a table piece at the Philadelphia Art Alliance, erotically displays two phallic forms, which reach out toward each other. One comes from colored pieces of glass, while the other is part of a piece of transparent glass. For this writer, the pieces underscore the libidinous forms of nature. Desire and spiritual matters both come together in the show. In the long run, what is most important about this body of work is its collaborative manufacture, its spiritual insight, and its interpretation of another culture. These things indicate an openness toward culture and art that invests Boothe and Cohen’s work with real dignity and insight. We are living in a time when depth is missing from culture, but the artists here are offering exactly that. We must be grateful for their efforts.

 

Essay by Jonathan Goodman

 

Drawings by Mi Ju

The Arts Council of Princeton and the Princeton Public Library present a curated exhibition of paired poems and artwork. This exhibition demonstrates how the image and the written word can be in conversation with each other. Drawings by Brooklyn-based artist, Mi Ju. Poems by John Clare, Rita Dove, Pauline Johnson (Tekahionwake), and Dara-Lyn Shrager.

Mi Ju is an internationally exhibited artist who lives and works in New York City.

Out of Character

I have a lifelong love affair with paper and have saved, catalogued and hoarded report cards, postcards, travel brochures, invoices, documents, medical records and books of travels, important personal events and several generations of my family’s ephemera.

My investigations into portraiture through the use of original source documents and related material has its roots in the desire to record and capture time while exploring memory in order to establish identities and reveal new perspectives. Even as portraits typically evoke a likeness, filtered through personality or mood, they also form a historical record that tells an incomplete story. Documents are nonjudgmental and reflect many forgotten aspects of personal history as they relate to society, cultural practices and personal idiosyncrasies. They are evidence of the multiple aspects of a point in time; building blocks to the whole. The reuse of these precious papers is with the intent of repurposing them for future reflection. They become not just the surface of the portrait, but materialize as inherent elements of the narrative. Words, times and dates of particular importance blend into shadows in order to tell the story.

My bird travelogues are represented by a native species from an area I’ve traveled and the papers included reflect my experiences there.

My current series, “Character Studies”, are collages comprised of papers on which I have written letters to the subject using rubber stamps and handwriting. These images are the amalgam of outward appearance and inward introspection.

-Trudy Borenstein-Sugiura



Trudy Borenstein-Sugiura is an award-winning designer of fine jewelry and tabletop objects whose work is included in the Permanent Collection of the Smithsonian Institution at the Cooper-Hewitt Museum, and has been exhibited and sold in galleries, design stores and museums internationally. After a full and successful career in the jewelry industry, Trudy has returned to her fine art training to create art in its purest form. She is inspired by her current explorations; creating portraits out of the important documents of her subject’s lives. Carefully organizing and categorizing medical records, report cards, death certificates, maps and more, to construct likenesses that explore memory and reveal new perspectives. Through scrupulous arrangements and obsessive detail, she is telling stories; exploring the past and repurposing it for future reflection. In the past 2 years, her current work has been exhibited in galleries in New York City, Chicago, Denver, L.A. and the Hamptons.

Sculpture by Gyuri Hollosy


At a very young age, Gyuri Hollosy started his career in sculptured art and in the 1960’s, attended the Cleveland Institute of Art. Gaining an interest in sculptures, Gyuri began fusing materials together to create beautiful original sculpture artwork in the 1970’s. Gyuri’s artwork represents a philosophy, an emotion or a portrait of an influential figure or time period of our history.

As a bronze sculpture artist, Gyuri has been able to transform his visions into reality and create one-of-a-kind pieces of artwork. There is a detailed process involved in designing and fabricating his work; the end result is very appealing to the eye. He uses a multitude of materials and techniques to sculpt 3-dimensional figures.

You can find his work in various locations around the country. He has been recognized for his talent and is the recipient of many prestigious awards. Gyuri expanded his artistic talent and created original artwork oil paintings in addition to his sculptures. Much of what Gyuri has to offer is based upon his new language of expression through bodies that were fragmented and partial.

Gyuri hopes that you will be intrigued by the elements of strength and fragility revealed by his figures. For an in-depth insight into Gyuri Hollosy’s artistic background, you may view his biography page and also take a look at his collections page. Gyuri is available by email or telephone number, which are both listed on his contact page. Both of Gyuri’s original sculptor artwork and original artwork oil paintings are viewable on his gallery page.

The Shape of Color

The Arts Council of Princeton presents The Shape of Color: Photographs by Walter Frank in the Solley Lobby Gallery. Join us for an Opening Reception on Saturday, October 6 from 3-5pm.

 

“In 1970, I purchased a Honeywell Pentax 35m camera not long after arriving in San Francisco as a newly minted attorney. My sojourn in California lasted 4 years; Roughly 31 years later I finally bid farewell to my loyal friend and entered the digital age.

All the framed pictures in this exhibit were taken with various iterations of the Panasonic Lumix Digital Camera, its main virtues being a superb Leica lens and unobtrusive size that allowed me to take it anywhere and use it or not as I pleased. These images have not been photo-shopped.  The colors you see are what I saw or, more accurately, what the camera saw.

My father was a gifted commercial artist who, among other things, drew Captain Midnight and Gabby Hayes comics. I inherited quite literally not an iota of his talent. Even my stick figures draw puzzled looks. So photography for me has been the default option for expressing myself however indirectly in a visual manner.

I had originally thought of calling this exhibit, Things You Might Not Notice.  For me, the fun of photography is trying to see things from a slightly different angle. The camera’s great gift is its capacity to isolate and capture what you think you see. Sometimes the camera says, ‘What exactly were you thinking?’ Occasionally, however, it says, ‘Not bad.'”

-Walter Frank

 

[caption id="attachment_22363" align="aligncenter" width="381"] Photography by Walter Frank[/caption]

Thursday, October 18

Film Screening: If You Build It

- Free and Open to the Public!
[embed]https://vimeo.com/79902240[/embed]

 

 

From the director of WORDPLAY and I.O.U.S.A. comes a captivating look at a radically innovative approach to education. IF YOU BUILD IT follows designer-activists Emily Pilloton and Matthew Miller to rural Bertie County, the poorest in North Carolina, where they work with local high school students to help transform both their community and their lives. Living on credit and grant money and fighting a change-resistant school board, Pilloton and Miller lead their students through a year-long, full-scale design and build project that does much more than just teach basic construction skills: it shows ten teenagers the power of design-thinking to re-invent not just their town but their own sense of what’s possible.

Directed by Patrick Creadon and produced by Christine O’Malley and Neal Baer, IF YOU BUILD IT offers a compelling and hopeful vision for a new kind of classroom in which students learn the tools to design their own futures.

Enjoy refreshments from Sourland Spirits and Terhune Orchards. 

The screening of If You Build It was made possible by Joshua Zinder Architecture + Design, Kirsten Thoft Architect, and Mike Hathaway of Revival Construction.

Colloquy

Last year, in 2017, Anna Boothe and Nancy Cohen collaborated on a series of sculptures that were shown at the Philadelphia Art Alliance; the works shown owed a lot to the thangka, a type of Tibetan Buddhist painting that represents a Buddhist deity or an image taken from the Tibetan religious imaginary.  Buddhist imagery has been a part of American thinking and making for more than two generations now, so Boothe and Cohen belong to a well-established tradition in contemporary American art. Their work, a subtle combination of materials and ideas, feeds the notion of a dialogue–both between the two artists and between the artists and the world, the subjective laboratory that makes up their domain. Buddhist art tends to demonstrate the benefits of loss of self, while contemporary art is often about personal assertion. Trying to merge the two is not without its difficulties! The merger is made more complex by the fact of the two artists’ collaboration, which presupposes a shared esthetic and preference for materials, but this in fact may not always be so.

 

 

 

 

Between Seeing and Knowing
Glass, resin, metal, monofilament
Courtesy of the Philadelphia International Airport Art Program

 

 

Boothe and Cohen build subtle structures whose accumulated energies link their efforts to feeling and thought that last because of the well-constructed quality of their art. The large wall of imagery that constitutes Between Seeing and Knowing  (2017) offers mostly organic abstractions, but there are some mechanical-looking images as well–fragments of a divine machine! The randomness of the imagery attains a wholistic unity when looked at from a distance or over time. Boothe and Cohen are artists first and foremost; they have made it clear they are not religious seekers. But Buddhist principles can apply to their art: Buddhism is more about a process–an ongoing searching–than it is about achieving a specific religious insight, and the audience senses, on seeing this wall of discrete images, that the works are intended to be seen as artworks posessing a spiritual outlook. Petal Pose (2017) is overtly phallic–to the point of visual unease! It consists of a violently red tumescent head surrounded by a green stem and leaves. The image’s literalism disturbs a bit, but it also underscores the fact that the spirituality and natural imagery that Boothe and Cohen make use of can sustain very different points of view  (sometimes eroticism can replace piety!). Buddhism’s sensitivity toward nature has always been very high, and the two artists make it evidently clear in their work.

The exquisite sculpture Unseen/Unknown (2017) consists of a small, white lotus flower flanked on either side by brown leaves, beneath which we see the mixture of a drawing and a sculpture in a neutrally tan color. The recognition of unknowing is always a part of any religious doctrine, and the lotus flower, so central to Buddhist thought and devotion, maintains an air of mystery. This piece, like the rest of the works made by Boothe and Cohen, is exquisite in its facture–as a group, the discrete sculptures meld and offer something larger than a small conglomerate of individual pieces. Having seen a Buddhist shrine in the countryside in Korea a number of years ago, I can vouch for the overcrowding of the sacred space with repetitive imageries. So the large number of discrete objects in this show play a role in which the entirety of experience is meant to be acknowledged–in the powerful landscape of the show’s totality.

 

Shift
Glass, metal, handmade paper

 

 

There is a larger question to be asked: how is this work contemporary art? It is pretty clear that the abundant use of metaphor found in the works argue for a new way of seeing, just as the cumulative effect of the many small works demonstrates the artists’ sly awareness of the many’s ability to become one in a sleight of hand that can only be considered currently available. The spiritual aspect of this work is more complicated than it would seem–religion is what you make of it, and the terms of this body of works do tend to address the individual imagination rather than the group’s. Additionally, the artists have made it clear that while the thangka influences their formal approach, the tenets of Buddhism are not being assiduously addressed in their art. But that does not mean the individual works of art are lacking in sincerity. The major difference in the works encountered here is that they are abstract, while the imagery of Buddhism is a mixture of the figurative–images of the Buddha–and the abstract–the design of the mandala. Yet this is a time now when claims are being made for contemporary art that cannot be sustained–at least in a spiritual sense. Indeed, in this body of work, the thangka works more effectively as a formal principle than a theological one.

Permutation Drawing I (2017), is a very beautiful gray-and-white monoprint with graphic signs of natural forms that are arranged in curving rows. It rings changes on basic curvilinear shapes, establishing a visual harmony not too easily established in a culture where abstraction is well known. The charm of the work also is not truly in keeping with the rough materialism of much of today’s art. Pollination (2017), displayed as a table piece at the Philadelphia Art Alliance, erotically displays two phallic forms, which reach out toward each other. One comes from colored pieces of glass, while the other is part of a piece of transparent glass. For this writer, the pieces underscore the libidinous forms of nature. Desire and spiritual matters both come together in the show. In the long run, what is most important about this body of work is its collaborative manufacture, its spiritual insight, and its interpretation of another culture. These things indicate an openness toward culture and art that invests Boothe and Cohen’s work with real dignity and insight. We are living in a time when depth is missing from culture, but the artists here are offering exactly that. We must be grateful for their efforts.

 

Essay by Jonathan Goodman

 

Drawings by Mi Ju

The Arts Council of Princeton and the Princeton Public Library present a curated exhibition of paired poems and artwork. This exhibition demonstrates how the image and the written word can be in conversation with each other. Drawings by Brooklyn-based artist, Mi Ju. Poems by John Clare, Rita Dove, Pauline Johnson (Tekahionwake), and Dara-Lyn Shrager.

Mi Ju is an internationally exhibited artist who lives and works in New York City.

Out of Character

I have a lifelong love affair with paper and have saved, catalogued and hoarded report cards, postcards, travel brochures, invoices, documents, medical records and books of travels, important personal events and several generations of my family’s ephemera.

My investigations into portraiture through the use of original source documents and related material has its roots in the desire to record and capture time while exploring memory in order to establish identities and reveal new perspectives. Even as portraits typically evoke a likeness, filtered through personality or mood, they also form a historical record that tells an incomplete story. Documents are nonjudgmental and reflect many forgotten aspects of personal history as they relate to society, cultural practices and personal idiosyncrasies. They are evidence of the multiple aspects of a point in time; building blocks to the whole. The reuse of these precious papers is with the intent of repurposing them for future reflection. They become not just the surface of the portrait, but materialize as inherent elements of the narrative. Words, times and dates of particular importance blend into shadows in order to tell the story.

My bird travelogues are represented by a native species from an area I’ve traveled and the papers included reflect my experiences there.

My current series, “Character Studies”, are collages comprised of papers on which I have written letters to the subject using rubber stamps and handwriting. These images are the amalgam of outward appearance and inward introspection.

-Trudy Borenstein-Sugiura



Trudy Borenstein-Sugiura is an award-winning designer of fine jewelry and tabletop objects whose work is included in the Permanent Collection of the Smithsonian Institution at the Cooper-Hewitt Museum, and has been exhibited and sold in galleries, design stores and museums internationally. After a full and successful career in the jewelry industry, Trudy has returned to her fine art training to create art in its purest form. She is inspired by her current explorations; creating portraits out of the important documents of her subject’s lives. Carefully organizing and categorizing medical records, report cards, death certificates, maps and more, to construct likenesses that explore memory and reveal new perspectives. Through scrupulous arrangements and obsessive detail, she is telling stories; exploring the past and repurposing it for future reflection. In the past 2 years, her current work has been exhibited in galleries in New York City, Chicago, Denver, L.A. and the Hamptons.

Sculpture by Gyuri Hollosy


At a very young age, Gyuri Hollosy started his career in sculptured art and in the 1960’s, attended the Cleveland Institute of Art. Gaining an interest in sculptures, Gyuri began fusing materials together to create beautiful original sculpture artwork in the 1970’s. Gyuri’s artwork represents a philosophy, an emotion or a portrait of an influential figure or time period of our history.

As a bronze sculpture artist, Gyuri has been able to transform his visions into reality and create one-of-a-kind pieces of artwork. There is a detailed process involved in designing and fabricating his work; the end result is very appealing to the eye. He uses a multitude of materials and techniques to sculpt 3-dimensional figures.

You can find his work in various locations around the country. He has been recognized for his talent and is the recipient of many prestigious awards. Gyuri expanded his artistic talent and created original artwork oil paintings in addition to his sculptures. Much of what Gyuri has to offer is based upon his new language of expression through bodies that were fragmented and partial.

Gyuri hopes that you will be intrigued by the elements of strength and fragility revealed by his figures. For an in-depth insight into Gyuri Hollosy’s artistic background, you may view his biography page and also take a look at his collections page. Gyuri is available by email or telephone number, which are both listed on his contact page. Both of Gyuri’s original sculptor artwork and original artwork oil paintings are viewable on his gallery page.

The Shape of Color

The Arts Council of Princeton presents The Shape of Color: Photographs by Walter Frank in the Solley Lobby Gallery. Join us for an Opening Reception on Saturday, October 6 from 3-5pm.

 

“In 1970, I purchased a Honeywell Pentax 35m camera not long after arriving in San Francisco as a newly minted attorney. My sojourn in California lasted 4 years; Roughly 31 years later I finally bid farewell to my loyal friend and entered the digital age.

All the framed pictures in this exhibit were taken with various iterations of the Panasonic Lumix Digital Camera, its main virtues being a superb Leica lens and unobtrusive size that allowed me to take it anywhere and use it or not as I pleased. These images have not been photo-shopped.  The colors you see are what I saw or, more accurately, what the camera saw.

My father was a gifted commercial artist who, among other things, drew Captain Midnight and Gabby Hayes comics. I inherited quite literally not an iota of his talent. Even my stick figures draw puzzled looks. So photography for me has been the default option for expressing myself however indirectly in a visual manner.

I had originally thought of calling this exhibit, Things You Might Not Notice.  For me, the fun of photography is trying to see things from a slightly different angle. The camera’s great gift is its capacity to isolate and capture what you think you see. Sometimes the camera says, ‘What exactly were you thinking?’ Occasionally, however, it says, ‘Not bad.'”

-Walter Frank

 

[caption id="attachment_22363" align="aligncenter" width="381"] Photography by Walter Frank[/caption]

Friday, October 19

Colloquy

Last year, in 2017, Anna Boothe and Nancy Cohen collaborated on a series of sculptures that were shown at the Philadelphia Art Alliance; the works shown owed a lot to the thangka, a type of Tibetan Buddhist painting that represents a Buddhist deity or an image taken from the Tibetan religious imaginary.  Buddhist imagery has been a part of American thinking and making for more than two generations now, so Boothe and Cohen belong to a well-established tradition in contemporary American art. Their work, a subtle combination of materials and ideas, feeds the notion of a dialogue–both between the two artists and between the artists and the world, the subjective laboratory that makes up their domain. Buddhist art tends to demonstrate the benefits of loss of self, while contemporary art is often about personal assertion. Trying to merge the two is not without its difficulties! The merger is made more complex by the fact of the two artists’ collaboration, which presupposes a shared esthetic and preference for materials, but this in fact may not always be so.

 

 

 

 

Between Seeing and Knowing
Glass, resin, metal, monofilament
Courtesy of the Philadelphia International Airport Art Program

 

 

Boothe and Cohen build subtle structures whose accumulated energies link their efforts to feeling and thought that last because of the well-constructed quality of their art. The large wall of imagery that constitutes Between Seeing and Knowing  (2017) offers mostly organic abstractions, but there are some mechanical-looking images as well–fragments of a divine machine! The randomness of the imagery attains a wholistic unity when looked at from a distance or over time. Boothe and Cohen are artists first and foremost; they have made it clear they are not religious seekers. But Buddhist principles can apply to their art: Buddhism is more about a process–an ongoing searching–than it is about achieving a specific religious insight, and the audience senses, on seeing this wall of discrete images, that the works are intended to be seen as artworks posessing a spiritual outlook. Petal Pose (2017) is overtly phallic–to the point of visual unease! It consists of a violently red tumescent head surrounded by a green stem and leaves. The image’s literalism disturbs a bit, but it also underscores the fact that the spirituality and natural imagery that Boothe and Cohen make use of can sustain very different points of view  (sometimes eroticism can replace piety!). Buddhism’s sensitivity toward nature has always been very high, and the two artists make it evidently clear in their work.

The exquisite sculpture Unseen/Unknown (2017) consists of a small, white lotus flower flanked on either side by brown leaves, beneath which we see the mixture of a drawing and a sculpture in a neutrally tan color. The recognition of unknowing is always a part of any religious doctrine, and the lotus flower, so central to Buddhist thought and devotion, maintains an air of mystery. This piece, like the rest of the works made by Boothe and Cohen, is exquisite in its facture–as a group, the discrete sculptures meld and offer something larger than a small conglomerate of individual pieces. Having seen a Buddhist shrine in the countryside in Korea a number of years ago, I can vouch for the overcrowding of the sacred space with repetitive imageries. So the large number of discrete objects in this show play a role in which the entirety of experience is meant to be acknowledged–in the powerful landscape of the show’s totality.

 

Shift
Glass, metal, handmade paper

 

 

There is a larger question to be asked: how is this work contemporary art? It is pretty clear that the abundant use of metaphor found in the works argue for a new way of seeing, just as the cumulative effect of the many small works demonstrates the artists’ sly awareness of the many’s ability to become one in a sleight of hand that can only be considered currently available. The spiritual aspect of this work is more complicated than it would seem–religion is what you make of it, and the terms of this body of works do tend to address the individual imagination rather than the group’s. Additionally, the artists have made it clear that while the thangka influences their formal approach, the tenets of Buddhism are not being assiduously addressed in their art. But that does not mean the individual works of art are lacking in sincerity. The major difference in the works encountered here is that they are abstract, while the imagery of Buddhism is a mixture of the figurative–images of the Buddha–and the abstract–the design of the mandala. Yet this is a time now when claims are being made for contemporary art that cannot be sustained–at least in a spiritual sense. Indeed, in this body of work, the thangka works more effectively as a formal principle than a theological one.

Permutation Drawing I (2017), is a very beautiful gray-and-white monoprint with graphic signs of natural forms that are arranged in curving rows. It rings changes on basic curvilinear shapes, establishing a visual harmony not too easily established in a culture where abstraction is well known. The charm of the work also is not truly in keeping with the rough materialism of much of today’s art. Pollination (2017), displayed as a table piece at the Philadelphia Art Alliance, erotically displays two phallic forms, which reach out toward each other. One comes from colored pieces of glass, while the other is part of a piece of transparent glass. For this writer, the pieces underscore the libidinous forms of nature. Desire and spiritual matters both come together in the show. In the long run, what is most important about this body of work is its collaborative manufacture, its spiritual insight, and its interpretation of another culture. These things indicate an openness toward culture and art that invests Boothe and Cohen’s work with real dignity and insight. We are living in a time when depth is missing from culture, but the artists here are offering exactly that. We must be grateful for their efforts.

 

Essay by Jonathan Goodman

 

Drawings by Mi Ju

The Arts Council of Princeton and the Princeton Public Library present a curated exhibition of paired poems and artwork. This exhibition demonstrates how the image and the written word can be in conversation with each other. Drawings by Brooklyn-based artist, Mi Ju. Poems by John Clare, Rita Dove, Pauline Johnson (Tekahionwake), and Dara-Lyn Shrager.

Mi Ju is an internationally exhibited artist who lives and works in New York City.

Out of Character

I have a lifelong love affair with paper and have saved, catalogued and hoarded report cards, postcards, travel brochures, invoices, documents, medical records and books of travels, important personal events and several generations of my family’s ephemera.

My investigations into portraiture through the use of original source documents and related material has its roots in the desire to record and capture time while exploring memory in order to establish identities and reveal new perspectives. Even as portraits typically evoke a likeness, filtered through personality or mood, they also form a historical record that tells an incomplete story. Documents are nonjudgmental and reflect many forgotten aspects of personal history as they relate to society, cultural practices and personal idiosyncrasies. They are evidence of the multiple aspects of a point in time; building blocks to the whole. The reuse of these precious papers is with the intent of repurposing them for future reflection. They become not just the surface of the portrait, but materialize as inherent elements of the narrative. Words, times and dates of particular importance blend into shadows in order to tell the story.

My bird travelogues are represented by a native species from an area I’ve traveled and the papers included reflect my experiences there.

My current series, “Character Studies”, are collages comprised of papers on which I have written letters to the subject using rubber stamps and handwriting. These images are the amalgam of outward appearance and inward introspection.

-Trudy Borenstein-Sugiura



Trudy Borenstein-Sugiura is an award-winning designer of fine jewelry and tabletop objects whose work is included in the Permanent Collection of the Smithsonian Institution at the Cooper-Hewitt Museum, and has been exhibited and sold in galleries, design stores and museums internationally. After a full and successful career in the jewelry industry, Trudy has returned to her fine art training to create art in its purest form. She is inspired by her current explorations; creating portraits out of the important documents of her subject’s lives. Carefully organizing and categorizing medical records, report cards, death certificates, maps and more, to construct likenesses that explore memory and reveal new perspectives. Through scrupulous arrangements and obsessive detail, she is telling stories; exploring the past and repurposing it for future reflection. In the past 2 years, her current work has been exhibited in galleries in New York City, Chicago, Denver, L.A. and the Hamptons.

Sculpture by Gyuri Hollosy


At a very young age, Gyuri Hollosy started his career in sculptured art and in the 1960’s, attended the Cleveland Institute of Art. Gaining an interest in sculptures, Gyuri began fusing materials together to create beautiful original sculpture artwork in the 1970’s. Gyuri’s artwork represents a philosophy, an emotion or a portrait of an influential figure or time period of our history.

As a bronze sculpture artist, Gyuri has been able to transform his visions into reality and create one-of-a-kind pieces of artwork. There is a detailed process involved in designing and fabricating his work; the end result is very appealing to the eye. He uses a multitude of materials and techniques to sculpt 3-dimensional figures.

You can find his work in various locations around the country. He has been recognized for his talent and is the recipient of many prestigious awards. Gyuri expanded his artistic talent and created original artwork oil paintings in addition to his sculptures. Much of what Gyuri has to offer is based upon his new language of expression through bodies that were fragmented and partial.

Gyuri hopes that you will be intrigued by the elements of strength and fragility revealed by his figures. For an in-depth insight into Gyuri Hollosy’s artistic background, you may view his biography page and also take a look at his collections page. Gyuri is available by email or telephone number, which are both listed on his contact page. Both of Gyuri’s original sculptor artwork and original artwork oil paintings are viewable on his gallery page.

The Shape of Color

The Arts Council of Princeton presents The Shape of Color: Photographs by Walter Frank in the Solley Lobby Gallery. Join us for an Opening Reception on Saturday, October 6 from 3-5pm.

 

“In 1970, I purchased a Honeywell Pentax 35m camera not long after arriving in San Francisco as a newly minted attorney. My sojourn in California lasted 4 years; Roughly 31 years later I finally bid farewell to my loyal friend and entered the digital age.

All the framed pictures in this exhibit were taken with various iterations of the Panasonic Lumix Digital Camera, its main virtues being a superb Leica lens and unobtrusive size that allowed me to take it anywhere and use it or not as I pleased. These images have not been photo-shopped.  The colors you see are what I saw or, more accurately, what the camera saw.

My father was a gifted commercial artist who, among other things, drew Captain Midnight and Gabby Hayes comics. I inherited quite literally not an iota of his talent. Even my stick figures draw puzzled looks. So photography for me has been the default option for expressing myself however indirectly in a visual manner.

I had originally thought of calling this exhibit, Things You Might Not Notice.  For me, the fun of photography is trying to see things from a slightly different angle. The camera’s great gift is its capacity to isolate and capture what you think you see. Sometimes the camera says, ‘What exactly were you thinking?’ Occasionally, however, it says, ‘Not bad.'”

-Walter Frank

 

[caption id="attachment_22363" align="aligncenter" width="381"] Photography by Walter Frank[/caption]