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Saturday, January 5

Gallery Talk: Diana Weymar and Nelson Hancock of All That You Leave Behind

- Free and Open to the Public!

Join the Arts Council of Princeton in our award-winning Taplin Gallery for a talk with Diana Weymar and Nelson Hancock, artists of All That You  Leave Behind. Immediately following the talk will be an Opening Reception with refreshments generously provided by Mediterra Restaurant and Taverna.

Diana Weymar is an Artist based in Princeton, NJ. She is the creator of ​Interwoven Stories​, a textile and  stitching community-based project developed at the Arts Council of Princeton. She has been an Artist-in-Resident with The Textile Arts Center (Manhattan), The University of Puget Sound (Tacoma), and Build Peace (Cyprus, Switzerland).

Nelson Hancock is a New York-based professional photographer. He has a PhD in Anthropology from Columbia University and has taught at Pratt and other institutions. He has photographed a wide variety of subjects from Kamchatka to New York including celebrities, knitters, families, and abandoned theaters.

All That You Leave Behind

[caption id="attachment_23052" align="aligncenter" width="575"] Nelson Hancock[/caption]

All That You Leave Behind, a collaboration between textile artist Diana Weymar and photographer Nelson Hancock, explores narrative and artistic interpretations of personal, everyday objects. How many of us have shopped at estate sales, driven past dilapidated houses, or visited historical sites only to find ourselves creating stories about the former owners or occupants? The urge to tell stories about what is left behind satisfies our need and desire to infuse the materiality of objects with personal meaning.

 

[caption id="attachment_23055" align="aligncenter" width="1024"] Diana Weymar[/caption]

Objects are a material evidence of life already lived. We carefully curate our own lives based on the premise that meaning can be implied, that we can control our own narratives after we have passed, and that we will be remembered through these objects. When we photograph an object or use one for artist interpretation, we are both speaking for it and for ourselves. Whether it’s a photo of a worn and decaying kitchen, embroidered text on a doll’s clothing, or an actual object, the space between it and the viewer is filled with intangible forces that have defined our lives.

 

Drawings by Mi Ju

The Arts Council of Princeton and the Princeton Public Library present a curated exhibition of paired poems and artwork. This exhibition demonstrates how the image and the written word can be in conversation with each other. Drawings by Brooklyn-based artist, Mi Ju. Poems by John Clare, Rita Dove, Pauline Johnson (Tekahionwake), and Dara-Lyn Shrager.

Mi Ju is an internationally exhibited artist who lives and works in New York City.

Out of Character

I have a lifelong love affair with paper and have saved, catalogued and hoarded report cards, postcards, travel brochures, invoices, documents, medical records and books of travels, important personal events and several generations of my family’s ephemera.

My investigations into portraiture through the use of original source documents and related material has its roots in the desire to record and capture time while exploring memory in order to establish identities and reveal new perspectives. Even as portraits typically evoke a likeness, filtered through personality or mood, they also form a historical record that tells an incomplete story. Documents are nonjudgmental and reflect many forgotten aspects of personal history as they relate to society, cultural practices and personal idiosyncrasies. They are evidence of the multiple aspects of a point in time; building blocks to the whole. The reuse of these precious papers is with the intent of repurposing them for future reflection. They become not just the surface of the portrait, but materialize as inherent elements of the narrative. Words, times and dates of particular importance blend into shadows in order to tell the story.

My bird travelogues are represented by a native species from an area I’ve traveled and the papers included reflect my experiences there.

My current series, “Character Studies”, are collages comprised of papers on which I have written letters to the subject using rubber stamps and handwriting. These images are the amalgam of outward appearance and inward introspection.

-Trudy Borenstein-Sugiura



Trudy Borenstein-Sugiura is an award-winning designer of fine jewelry and tabletop objects whose work is included in the Permanent Collection of the Smithsonian Institution at the Cooper-Hewitt Museum, and has been exhibited and sold in galleries, design stores and museums internationally. After a full and successful career in the jewelry industry, Trudy has returned to her fine art training to create art in its purest form. She is inspired by her current explorations; creating portraits out of the important documents of her subject’s lives. Carefully organizing and categorizing medical records, report cards, death certificates, maps and more, to construct likenesses that explore memory and reveal new perspectives. Through scrupulous arrangements and obsessive detail, she is telling stories; exploring the past and repurposing it for future reflection. In the past 2 years, her current work has been exhibited in galleries in New York City, Chicago, Denver, L.A. and the Hamptons.

Taking Pause

Taking Pause is a documentary, collaborative portrait project that asks people to reflect on what in their lives feels most essential. With what do we identify and connect most deeply? What truly matters to us and why?

The goal is to ask the same simple, thought-provoking question — what is irreplaceable to you — of the widest possible range of participants and to document the differences and commonalities of these reflections while engaging the spectrum of American diversity and disconnections, both political and economic.

This is a collaborative project because those who participate are more than passing subjects. In addition to sharing something of deep personal resonance, each participant also tells the story behind what they chose and engages others to take part in the project. Participants are documented in their home or place of their choosing with two distinct portraits. One of themselves, their physical selves, and an accompanying portrait of their reflective selves through what they have chosen to share. Each person is also asked to tell the story behind their selection, both orally, during the making of their portraits, and later, for the context of the long-term manifestation of the project as a book and exhibition, as a brief written text.

To advance and attain diversity in the series, each participant accepts some ownership in the project and, with thought and consideration, lays forward the collaboration by engaging one or two others to take part, helping to organically involve the spectrum of geographical regions and socioeconomic classes of the United States. The goal is to encompass the full range of our society, from the financially secure to the evicted to those who have lost everything in recent natural disasters.

Taking Pause is a collective project that aims to create an intimate glimpse of our country in a troubling and disconnected time. The United States, one of the wealthiest countries on earth, has a disparity in income that is unconscionable. We live in a period of incredible abundance but are we aware of what really matters? Many of us find ourselves struggling to find clarity in a sea of possessions that occupy our physical environment and block our mental space yet whose meaning is long lost or worse, never even existed. How we manage our mounting accumulation of possessions, and the inherent wastefulness of this in terms of material, time and natural resources, has become a huge societal problem — independent of means or situation.

Taking Pause combines photographs and stories in a visual and verbal narrative that explores both the complexities and simplicities of what we value. Participants are grateful to reflect and to share in this way. Thus far what people have shared is about deep memories and identity, not monetary value.

At a time when our country feels so torn and disconnected, Taking Pause aims to reconnect and place trust with those we don’t know. Participants are asked to host me when they are able so that we can spend some time getting to know each other and so that our interaction is about more than the making of the portraits and they are more than passing subjects. As such this project at its essence is about trust. The trust of participants in me to share something that is deeply personal as well as my trust in them to offer hospitality and to welcome me into their homes.

In our current society we are hyper “connected” in our dependency on devices, yet our lives have become increasingly hermetic and disconnected. Our communication and “social” activity has become more virtual than actual. Thus a crucial part of this project is its collaborative nature, which aspires to connect with people, share stories and spend time together. In short, to take pause, to reflect.

 

 

Sunday, January 6

Fiesta Del Reyes Magos (Three Kings Day)

- Suggested donation: $10

Join the Arts Council of Princeton for a special dance performance! Fiesta del Día de Los Reyes Magos, or Three Kings Day, is the last day of the Christmas season and is celebrated throughout the world by several different cultures.

Enjoy a live Flamenco dance performance by Lisa Botalico’s Fiesta Flamenca and rosca de reyes (Three Kings cake) courtesy of La Lupita Groceries. Learn about Spanish culture and end the holiday season in celebration! Suggested donation: $10.

Celebra la Fiesta del Dia de los Reyes Magos, un evento cultural para familias, presentando baile de Flamenco con Lisa Botalico y rosca de reyes (un pastel tradicional). Domingo, 6 de enero, 2018. Donación Sugerida: $10.

All That You Leave Behind

[caption id="attachment_23052" align="aligncenter" width="575"] Nelson Hancock[/caption]

All That You Leave Behind, a collaboration between textile artist Diana Weymar and photographer Nelson Hancock, explores narrative and artistic interpretations of personal, everyday objects. How many of us have shopped at estate sales, driven past dilapidated houses, or visited historical sites only to find ourselves creating stories about the former owners or occupants? The urge to tell stories about what is left behind satisfies our need and desire to infuse the materiality of objects with personal meaning.

 

[caption id="attachment_23055" align="aligncenter" width="1024"] Diana Weymar[/caption]

Objects are a material evidence of life already lived. We carefully curate our own lives based on the premise that meaning can be implied, that we can control our own narratives after we have passed, and that we will be remembered through these objects. When we photograph an object or use one for artist interpretation, we are both speaking for it and for ourselves. Whether it’s a photo of a worn and decaying kitchen, embroidered text on a doll’s clothing, or an actual object, the space between it and the viewer is filled with intangible forces that have defined our lives.

 

Drawings by Mi Ju

The Arts Council of Princeton and the Princeton Public Library present a curated exhibition of paired poems and artwork. This exhibition demonstrates how the image and the written word can be in conversation with each other. Drawings by Brooklyn-based artist, Mi Ju. Poems by John Clare, Rita Dove, Pauline Johnson (Tekahionwake), and Dara-Lyn Shrager.

Mi Ju is an internationally exhibited artist who lives and works in New York City.

Out of Character

I have a lifelong love affair with paper and have saved, catalogued and hoarded report cards, postcards, travel brochures, invoices, documents, medical records and books of travels, important personal events and several generations of my family’s ephemera.

My investigations into portraiture through the use of original source documents and related material has its roots in the desire to record and capture time while exploring memory in order to establish identities and reveal new perspectives. Even as portraits typically evoke a likeness, filtered through personality or mood, they also form a historical record that tells an incomplete story. Documents are nonjudgmental and reflect many forgotten aspects of personal history as they relate to society, cultural practices and personal idiosyncrasies. They are evidence of the multiple aspects of a point in time; building blocks to the whole. The reuse of these precious papers is with the intent of repurposing them for future reflection. They become not just the surface of the portrait, but materialize as inherent elements of the narrative. Words, times and dates of particular importance blend into shadows in order to tell the story.

My bird travelogues are represented by a native species from an area I’ve traveled and the papers included reflect my experiences there.

My current series, “Character Studies”, are collages comprised of papers on which I have written letters to the subject using rubber stamps and handwriting. These images are the amalgam of outward appearance and inward introspection.

-Trudy Borenstein-Sugiura



Trudy Borenstein-Sugiura is an award-winning designer of fine jewelry and tabletop objects whose work is included in the Permanent Collection of the Smithsonian Institution at the Cooper-Hewitt Museum, and has been exhibited and sold in galleries, design stores and museums internationally. After a full and successful career in the jewelry industry, Trudy has returned to her fine art training to create art in its purest form. She is inspired by her current explorations; creating portraits out of the important documents of her subject’s lives. Carefully organizing and categorizing medical records, report cards, death certificates, maps and more, to construct likenesses that explore memory and reveal new perspectives. Through scrupulous arrangements and obsessive detail, she is telling stories; exploring the past and repurposing it for future reflection. In the past 2 years, her current work has been exhibited in galleries in New York City, Chicago, Denver, L.A. and the Hamptons.

Taking Pause

Taking Pause is a documentary, collaborative portrait project that asks people to reflect on what in their lives feels most essential. With what do we identify and connect most deeply? What truly matters to us and why?

The goal is to ask the same simple, thought-provoking question — what is irreplaceable to you — of the widest possible range of participants and to document the differences and commonalities of these reflections while engaging the spectrum of American diversity and disconnections, both political and economic.

This is a collaborative project because those who participate are more than passing subjects. In addition to sharing something of deep personal resonance, each participant also tells the story behind what they chose and engages others to take part in the project. Participants are documented in their home or place of their choosing with two distinct portraits. One of themselves, their physical selves, and an accompanying portrait of their reflective selves through what they have chosen to share. Each person is also asked to tell the story behind their selection, both orally, during the making of their portraits, and later, for the context of the long-term manifestation of the project as a book and exhibition, as a brief written text.

To advance and attain diversity in the series, each participant accepts some ownership in the project and, with thought and consideration, lays forward the collaboration by engaging one or two others to take part, helping to organically involve the spectrum of geographical regions and socioeconomic classes of the United States. The goal is to encompass the full range of our society, from the financially secure to the evicted to those who have lost everything in recent natural disasters.

Taking Pause is a collective project that aims to create an intimate glimpse of our country in a troubling and disconnected time. The United States, one of the wealthiest countries on earth, has a disparity in income that is unconscionable. We live in a period of incredible abundance but are we aware of what really matters? Many of us find ourselves struggling to find clarity in a sea of possessions that occupy our physical environment and block our mental space yet whose meaning is long lost or worse, never even existed. How we manage our mounting accumulation of possessions, and the inherent wastefulness of this in terms of material, time and natural resources, has become a huge societal problem — independent of means or situation.

Taking Pause combines photographs and stories in a visual and verbal narrative that explores both the complexities and simplicities of what we value. Participants are grateful to reflect and to share in this way. Thus far what people have shared is about deep memories and identity, not monetary value.

At a time when our country feels so torn and disconnected, Taking Pause aims to reconnect and place trust with those we don’t know. Participants are asked to host me when they are able so that we can spend some time getting to know each other and so that our interaction is about more than the making of the portraits and they are more than passing subjects. As such this project at its essence is about trust. The trust of participants in me to share something that is deeply personal as well as my trust in them to offer hospitality and to welcome me into their homes.

In our current society we are hyper “connected” in our dependency on devices, yet our lives have become increasingly hermetic and disconnected. Our communication and “social” activity has become more virtual than actual. Thus a crucial part of this project is its collaborative nature, which aspires to connect with people, share stories and spend time together. In short, to take pause, to reflect.

 

 

Monday, January 7

All That You Leave Behind

[caption id="attachment_23052" align="aligncenter" width="575"] Nelson Hancock[/caption]

All That You Leave Behind, a collaboration between textile artist Diana Weymar and photographer Nelson Hancock, explores narrative and artistic interpretations of personal, everyday objects. How many of us have shopped at estate sales, driven past dilapidated houses, or visited historical sites only to find ourselves creating stories about the former owners or occupants? The urge to tell stories about what is left behind satisfies our need and desire to infuse the materiality of objects with personal meaning.

 

[caption id="attachment_23055" align="aligncenter" width="1024"] Diana Weymar[/caption]

Objects are a material evidence of life already lived. We carefully curate our own lives based on the premise that meaning can be implied, that we can control our own narratives after we have passed, and that we will be remembered through these objects. When we photograph an object or use one for artist interpretation, we are both speaking for it and for ourselves. Whether it’s a photo of a worn and decaying kitchen, embroidered text on a doll’s clothing, or an actual object, the space between it and the viewer is filled with intangible forces that have defined our lives.

 

Drawings by Mi Ju

The Arts Council of Princeton and the Princeton Public Library present a curated exhibition of paired poems and artwork. This exhibition demonstrates how the image and the written word can be in conversation with each other. Drawings by Brooklyn-based artist, Mi Ju. Poems by John Clare, Rita Dove, Pauline Johnson (Tekahionwake), and Dara-Lyn Shrager.

Mi Ju is an internationally exhibited artist who lives and works in New York City.

Out of Character

I have a lifelong love affair with paper and have saved, catalogued and hoarded report cards, postcards, travel brochures, invoices, documents, medical records and books of travels, important personal events and several generations of my family’s ephemera.

My investigations into portraiture through the use of original source documents and related material has its roots in the desire to record and capture time while exploring memory in order to establish identities and reveal new perspectives. Even as portraits typically evoke a likeness, filtered through personality or mood, they also form a historical record that tells an incomplete story. Documents are nonjudgmental and reflect many forgotten aspects of personal history as they relate to society, cultural practices and personal idiosyncrasies. They are evidence of the multiple aspects of a point in time; building blocks to the whole. The reuse of these precious papers is with the intent of repurposing them for future reflection. They become not just the surface of the portrait, but materialize as inherent elements of the narrative. Words, times and dates of particular importance blend into shadows in order to tell the story.

My bird travelogues are represented by a native species from an area I’ve traveled and the papers included reflect my experiences there.

My current series, “Character Studies”, are collages comprised of papers on which I have written letters to the subject using rubber stamps and handwriting. These images are the amalgam of outward appearance and inward introspection.

-Trudy Borenstein-Sugiura



Trudy Borenstein-Sugiura is an award-winning designer of fine jewelry and tabletop objects whose work is included in the Permanent Collection of the Smithsonian Institution at the Cooper-Hewitt Museum, and has been exhibited and sold in galleries, design stores and museums internationally. After a full and successful career in the jewelry industry, Trudy has returned to her fine art training to create art in its purest form. She is inspired by her current explorations; creating portraits out of the important documents of her subject’s lives. Carefully organizing and categorizing medical records, report cards, death certificates, maps and more, to construct likenesses that explore memory and reveal new perspectives. Through scrupulous arrangements and obsessive detail, she is telling stories; exploring the past and repurposing it for future reflection. In the past 2 years, her current work has been exhibited in galleries in New York City, Chicago, Denver, L.A. and the Hamptons.

Taking Pause

Taking Pause is a documentary, collaborative portrait project that asks people to reflect on what in their lives feels most essential. With what do we identify and connect most deeply? What truly matters to us and why?

The goal is to ask the same simple, thought-provoking question — what is irreplaceable to you — of the widest possible range of participants and to document the differences and commonalities of these reflections while engaging the spectrum of American diversity and disconnections, both political and economic.

This is a collaborative project because those who participate are more than passing subjects. In addition to sharing something of deep personal resonance, each participant also tells the story behind what they chose and engages others to take part in the project. Participants are documented in their home or place of their choosing with two distinct portraits. One of themselves, their physical selves, and an accompanying portrait of their reflective selves through what they have chosen to share. Each person is also asked to tell the story behind their selection, both orally, during the making of their portraits, and later, for the context of the long-term manifestation of the project as a book and exhibition, as a brief written text.

To advance and attain diversity in the series, each participant accepts some ownership in the project and, with thought and consideration, lays forward the collaboration by engaging one or two others to take part, helping to organically involve the spectrum of geographical regions and socioeconomic classes of the United States. The goal is to encompass the full range of our society, from the financially secure to the evicted to those who have lost everything in recent natural disasters.

Taking Pause is a collective project that aims to create an intimate glimpse of our country in a troubling and disconnected time. The United States, one of the wealthiest countries on earth, has a disparity in income that is unconscionable. We live in a period of incredible abundance but are we aware of what really matters? Many of us find ourselves struggling to find clarity in a sea of possessions that occupy our physical environment and block our mental space yet whose meaning is long lost or worse, never even existed. How we manage our mounting accumulation of possessions, and the inherent wastefulness of this in terms of material, time and natural resources, has become a huge societal problem — independent of means or situation.

Taking Pause combines photographs and stories in a visual and verbal narrative that explores both the complexities and simplicities of what we value. Participants are grateful to reflect and to share in this way. Thus far what people have shared is about deep memories and identity, not monetary value.

At a time when our country feels so torn and disconnected, Taking Pause aims to reconnect and place trust with those we don’t know. Participants are asked to host me when they are able so that we can spend some time getting to know each other and so that our interaction is about more than the making of the portraits and they are more than passing subjects. As such this project at its essence is about trust. The trust of participants in me to share something that is deeply personal as well as my trust in them to offer hospitality and to welcome me into their homes.

In our current society we are hyper “connected” in our dependency on devices, yet our lives have become increasingly hermetic and disconnected. Our communication and “social” activity has become more virtual than actual. Thus a crucial part of this project is its collaborative nature, which aspires to connect with people, share stories and spend time together. In short, to take pause, to reflect.

 

 

Tuesday, January 8

All That You Leave Behind

[caption id="attachment_23052" align="aligncenter" width="575"] Nelson Hancock[/caption]

All That You Leave Behind, a collaboration between textile artist Diana Weymar and photographer Nelson Hancock, explores narrative and artistic interpretations of personal, everyday objects. How many of us have shopped at estate sales, driven past dilapidated houses, or visited historical sites only to find ourselves creating stories about the former owners or occupants? The urge to tell stories about what is left behind satisfies our need and desire to infuse the materiality of objects with personal meaning.

 

[caption id="attachment_23055" align="aligncenter" width="1024"] Diana Weymar[/caption]

Objects are a material evidence of life already lived. We carefully curate our own lives based on the premise that meaning can be implied, that we can control our own narratives after we have passed, and that we will be remembered through these objects. When we photograph an object or use one for artist interpretation, we are both speaking for it and for ourselves. Whether it’s a photo of a worn and decaying kitchen, embroidered text on a doll’s clothing, or an actual object, the space between it and the viewer is filled with intangible forces that have defined our lives.

 

Taking Pause

Taking Pause is a documentary, collaborative portrait project that asks people to reflect on what in their lives feels most essential. With what do we identify and connect most deeply? What truly matters to us and why?

The goal is to ask the same simple, thought-provoking question — what is irreplaceable to you — of the widest possible range of participants and to document the differences and commonalities of these reflections while engaging the spectrum of American diversity and disconnections, both political and economic.

This is a collaborative project because those who participate are more than passing subjects. In addition to sharing something of deep personal resonance, each participant also tells the story behind what they chose and engages others to take part in the project. Participants are documented in their home or place of their choosing with two distinct portraits. One of themselves, their physical selves, and an accompanying portrait of their reflective selves through what they have chosen to share. Each person is also asked to tell the story behind their selection, both orally, during the making of their portraits, and later, for the context of the long-term manifestation of the project as a book and exhibition, as a brief written text.

To advance and attain diversity in the series, each participant accepts some ownership in the project and, with thought and consideration, lays forward the collaboration by engaging one or two others to take part, helping to organically involve the spectrum of geographical regions and socioeconomic classes of the United States. The goal is to encompass the full range of our society, from the financially secure to the evicted to those who have lost everything in recent natural disasters.

Taking Pause is a collective project that aims to create an intimate glimpse of our country in a troubling and disconnected time. The United States, one of the wealthiest countries on earth, has a disparity in income that is unconscionable. We live in a period of incredible abundance but are we aware of what really matters? Many of us find ourselves struggling to find clarity in a sea of possessions that occupy our physical environment and block our mental space yet whose meaning is long lost or worse, never even existed. How we manage our mounting accumulation of possessions, and the inherent wastefulness of this in terms of material, time and natural resources, has become a huge societal problem — independent of means or situation.

Taking Pause combines photographs and stories in a visual and verbal narrative that explores both the complexities and simplicities of what we value. Participants are grateful to reflect and to share in this way. Thus far what people have shared is about deep memories and identity, not monetary value.

At a time when our country feels so torn and disconnected, Taking Pause aims to reconnect and place trust with those we don’t know. Participants are asked to host me when they are able so that we can spend some time getting to know each other and so that our interaction is about more than the making of the portraits and they are more than passing subjects. As such this project at its essence is about trust. The trust of participants in me to share something that is deeply personal as well as my trust in them to offer hospitality and to welcome me into their homes.

In our current society we are hyper “connected” in our dependency on devices, yet our lives have become increasingly hermetic and disconnected. Our communication and “social” activity has become more virtual than actual. Thus a crucial part of this project is its collaborative nature, which aspires to connect with people, share stories and spend time together. In short, to take pause, to reflect.

 

 

Wednesday, January 9

All That You Leave Behind

[caption id="attachment_23052" align="aligncenter" width="575"] Nelson Hancock[/caption]

All That You Leave Behind, a collaboration between textile artist Diana Weymar and photographer Nelson Hancock, explores narrative and artistic interpretations of personal, everyday objects. How many of us have shopped at estate sales, driven past dilapidated houses, or visited historical sites only to find ourselves creating stories about the former owners or occupants? The urge to tell stories about what is left behind satisfies our need and desire to infuse the materiality of objects with personal meaning.

 

[caption id="attachment_23055" align="aligncenter" width="1024"] Diana Weymar[/caption]

Objects are a material evidence of life already lived. We carefully curate our own lives based on the premise that meaning can be implied, that we can control our own narratives after we have passed, and that we will be remembered through these objects. When we photograph an object or use one for artist interpretation, we are both speaking for it and for ourselves. Whether it’s a photo of a worn and decaying kitchen, embroidered text on a doll’s clothing, or an actual object, the space between it and the viewer is filled with intangible forces that have defined our lives.

 

Taking Pause

Taking Pause is a documentary, collaborative portrait project that asks people to reflect on what in their lives feels most essential. With what do we identify and connect most deeply? What truly matters to us and why?

The goal is to ask the same simple, thought-provoking question — what is irreplaceable to you — of the widest possible range of participants and to document the differences and commonalities of these reflections while engaging the spectrum of American diversity and disconnections, both political and economic.

This is a collaborative project because those who participate are more than passing subjects. In addition to sharing something of deep personal resonance, each participant also tells the story behind what they chose and engages others to take part in the project. Participants are documented in their home or place of their choosing with two distinct portraits. One of themselves, their physical selves, and an accompanying portrait of their reflective selves through what they have chosen to share. Each person is also asked to tell the story behind their selection, both orally, during the making of their portraits, and later, for the context of the long-term manifestation of the project as a book and exhibition, as a brief written text.

To advance and attain diversity in the series, each participant accepts some ownership in the project and, with thought and consideration, lays forward the collaboration by engaging one or two others to take part, helping to organically involve the spectrum of geographical regions and socioeconomic classes of the United States. The goal is to encompass the full range of our society, from the financially secure to the evicted to those who have lost everything in recent natural disasters.

Taking Pause is a collective project that aims to create an intimate glimpse of our country in a troubling and disconnected time. The United States, one of the wealthiest countries on earth, has a disparity in income that is unconscionable. We live in a period of incredible abundance but are we aware of what really matters? Many of us find ourselves struggling to find clarity in a sea of possessions that occupy our physical environment and block our mental space yet whose meaning is long lost or worse, never even existed. How we manage our mounting accumulation of possessions, and the inherent wastefulness of this in terms of material, time and natural resources, has become a huge societal problem — independent of means or situation.

Taking Pause combines photographs and stories in a visual and verbal narrative that explores both the complexities and simplicities of what we value. Participants are grateful to reflect and to share in this way. Thus far what people have shared is about deep memories and identity, not monetary value.

At a time when our country feels so torn and disconnected, Taking Pause aims to reconnect and place trust with those we don’t know. Participants are asked to host me when they are able so that we can spend some time getting to know each other and so that our interaction is about more than the making of the portraits and they are more than passing subjects. As such this project at its essence is about trust. The trust of participants in me to share something that is deeply personal as well as my trust in them to offer hospitality and to welcome me into their homes.

In our current society we are hyper “connected” in our dependency on devices, yet our lives have become increasingly hermetic and disconnected. Our communication and “social” activity has become more virtual than actual. Thus a crucial part of this project is its collaborative nature, which aspires to connect with people, share stories and spend time together. In short, to take pause, to reflect.

 

 

Thursday, January 10

Just Wing It! Community Stage Event

- Free and Open to the Public!

Join the Arts Council of Princeton for a performance by Just Wing It!

Just Wing It is Princeton High School’s only improv comedy troupe, showcasing a form of live theatre in which the plot, characters and dialogue of a game, scene or story are made up in the moment based on audience suggestions.

Program is free, but advance registration is recommended. Priority will be given to those who have registered in advance. Click here to RSVP via Eventbrite.

This performance is part of the Arts Council of Princeton’s Community Stage Series. Community Stage productions are free (and nearly free) held in collaboration with local artistic groups and organizations. Community Stage programming enable the Arts Council’s Solley Theater to act as an accessible space for community partnerships and high-quality artistic experiences.

All That You Leave Behind

[caption id="attachment_23052" align="aligncenter" width="575"] Nelson Hancock[/caption]

All That You Leave Behind, a collaboration between textile artist Diana Weymar and photographer Nelson Hancock, explores narrative and artistic interpretations of personal, everyday objects. How many of us have shopped at estate sales, driven past dilapidated houses, or visited historical sites only to find ourselves creating stories about the former owners or occupants? The urge to tell stories about what is left behind satisfies our need and desire to infuse the materiality of objects with personal meaning.

 

[caption id="attachment_23055" align="aligncenter" width="1024"] Diana Weymar[/caption]

Objects are a material evidence of life already lived. We carefully curate our own lives based on the premise that meaning can be implied, that we can control our own narratives after we have passed, and that we will be remembered through these objects. When we photograph an object or use one for artist interpretation, we are both speaking for it and for ourselves. Whether it’s a photo of a worn and decaying kitchen, embroidered text on a doll’s clothing, or an actual object, the space between it and the viewer is filled with intangible forces that have defined our lives.

 

Taking Pause

Taking Pause is a documentary, collaborative portrait project that asks people to reflect on what in their lives feels most essential. With what do we identify and connect most deeply? What truly matters to us and why?

The goal is to ask the same simple, thought-provoking question — what is irreplaceable to you — of the widest possible range of participants and to document the differences and commonalities of these reflections while engaging the spectrum of American diversity and disconnections, both political and economic.

This is a collaborative project because those who participate are more than passing subjects. In addition to sharing something of deep personal resonance, each participant also tells the story behind what they chose and engages others to take part in the project. Participants are documented in their home or place of their choosing with two distinct portraits. One of themselves, their physical selves, and an accompanying portrait of their reflective selves through what they have chosen to share. Each person is also asked to tell the story behind their selection, both orally, during the making of their portraits, and later, for the context of the long-term manifestation of the project as a book and exhibition, as a brief written text.

To advance and attain diversity in the series, each participant accepts some ownership in the project and, with thought and consideration, lays forward the collaboration by engaging one or two others to take part, helping to organically involve the spectrum of geographical regions and socioeconomic classes of the United States. The goal is to encompass the full range of our society, from the financially secure to the evicted to those who have lost everything in recent natural disasters.

Taking Pause is a collective project that aims to create an intimate glimpse of our country in a troubling and disconnected time. The United States, one of the wealthiest countries on earth, has a disparity in income that is unconscionable. We live in a period of incredible abundance but are we aware of what really matters? Many of us find ourselves struggling to find clarity in a sea of possessions that occupy our physical environment and block our mental space yet whose meaning is long lost or worse, never even existed. How we manage our mounting accumulation of possessions, and the inherent wastefulness of this in terms of material, time and natural resources, has become a huge societal problem — independent of means or situation.

Taking Pause combines photographs and stories in a visual and verbal narrative that explores both the complexities and simplicities of what we value. Participants are grateful to reflect and to share in this way. Thus far what people have shared is about deep memories and identity, not monetary value.

At a time when our country feels so torn and disconnected, Taking Pause aims to reconnect and place trust with those we don’t know. Participants are asked to host me when they are able so that we can spend some time getting to know each other and so that our interaction is about more than the making of the portraits and they are more than passing subjects. As such this project at its essence is about trust. The trust of participants in me to share something that is deeply personal as well as my trust in them to offer hospitality and to welcome me into their homes.

In our current society we are hyper “connected” in our dependency on devices, yet our lives have become increasingly hermetic and disconnected. Our communication and “social” activity has become more virtual than actual. Thus a crucial part of this project is its collaborative nature, which aspires to connect with people, share stories and spend time together. In short, to take pause, to reflect.

 

 

The Concussion Diaries

“I suffered a serious concussion in April 2017. Alice fell down a rabbit hole; I just fell on the floor. The doctors forbade ‘reading, screens of any sort, and complex thinking.’ For the first four months I couldn’t even listen to music. I wondered if I might go bonkers – and then I wondered if that was complex thinking. Without the capacity for the usual distractions, I found myself in a quiet world of color and composition. In some ways my sensory experience was stripped down, but in other ways it was heightened. On the daily walks required for my recovery, I noticed every detail of spring in New Jersey – leaves unfurling, vines encircling, the patterns in moss – with a piercing intensity.

At the suggestion of a friend I started painting. I had spent a lifetime deeply engaged by twentieth-century American artists and poets. My icons were the two Helens of New York, Frankenthaler and Levitt, and the poets Robert Hass and John Ashbery. At various points my artistic energy went into making photography, writing poetry and weaving, but I had always considered painting off limits. The concussion eliminated my silly, self-imposed restraints, and painting turned the disaster into discovery.

My limited faculties when I started painting freed me from spending any time thinking about why I was painting and what I was trying to say with my work. Two of my paintings, Charlottesville and Categoría Cinco (Maria) are direct responses to current events, but the others are explorations of technique, color and form. Asking myself now about the why and the what, I am reminded of a talk I went to by the photographers Laura McPhee and Virginia Beahan. In response to a student who asked about pursuing a career in art, one of them said, ‘If you don’t need to make photographs, you won’t.’ I am still finding my way as a painter, but I can say for certain that I need to make paintings.”

-Terri Riendeau

The Periodic Table of Elements


“My work has always been inspired, to one degree or another, by my interest and attention to the Sciences.


This new body of work, THE PERIODIC TABLE OF ELEMENTS, gets to the essence of life and ecosystems by focusing on the natural “elements” themselves which make everything in the natural and synthetic worlds possible.


Congruent with this are my own principle interests with surface and materiality as each work is an experiment with materials and texture – mixing a variety of gels and other additives to the paints in order to achieve the desired effect.  This is the driving force for me with relation to this project. Each element presents a new set of characteristics that need to be studied and assessed. This pushes me to experiment with textures and material effects that speak directly to the physical properties of each element, as well as, direct the color and compositional aspects of the work.  I consider experimentation and imagination to be the two key components in all creative endeavors and these are intrinsic to the creative process in general.


For me, every work should move forward in some way – never repeating motifs or notions about plasticity in order to attain consistency. Rather, painting is first and foremost about attention and discovery – attention for the sake of understanding and discovery for the sake of expression.”

-Robert DiMatteo

 

Friday, January 11

All That You Leave Behind

[caption id="attachment_23052" align="aligncenter" width="575"] Nelson Hancock[/caption]

All That You Leave Behind, a collaboration between textile artist Diana Weymar and photographer Nelson Hancock, explores narrative and artistic interpretations of personal, everyday objects. How many of us have shopped at estate sales, driven past dilapidated houses, or visited historical sites only to find ourselves creating stories about the former owners or occupants? The urge to tell stories about what is left behind satisfies our need and desire to infuse the materiality of objects with personal meaning.

 

[caption id="attachment_23055" align="aligncenter" width="1024"] Diana Weymar[/caption]

Objects are a material evidence of life already lived. We carefully curate our own lives based on the premise that meaning can be implied, that we can control our own narratives after we have passed, and that we will be remembered through these objects. When we photograph an object or use one for artist interpretation, we are both speaking for it and for ourselves. Whether it’s a photo of a worn and decaying kitchen, embroidered text on a doll’s clothing, or an actual object, the space between it and the viewer is filled with intangible forces that have defined our lives.

 

Taking Pause

Taking Pause is a documentary, collaborative portrait project that asks people to reflect on what in their lives feels most essential. With what do we identify and connect most deeply? What truly matters to us and why?

The goal is to ask the same simple, thought-provoking question — what is irreplaceable to you — of the widest possible range of participants and to document the differences and commonalities of these reflections while engaging the spectrum of American diversity and disconnections, both political and economic.

This is a collaborative project because those who participate are more than passing subjects. In addition to sharing something of deep personal resonance, each participant also tells the story behind what they chose and engages others to take part in the project. Participants are documented in their home or place of their choosing with two distinct portraits. One of themselves, their physical selves, and an accompanying portrait of their reflective selves through what they have chosen to share. Each person is also asked to tell the story behind their selection, both orally, during the making of their portraits, and later, for the context of the long-term manifestation of the project as a book and exhibition, as a brief written text.

To advance and attain diversity in the series, each participant accepts some ownership in the project and, with thought and consideration, lays forward the collaboration by engaging one or two others to take part, helping to organically involve the spectrum of geographical regions and socioeconomic classes of the United States. The goal is to encompass the full range of our society, from the financially secure to the evicted to those who have lost everything in recent natural disasters.

Taking Pause is a collective project that aims to create an intimate glimpse of our country in a troubling and disconnected time. The United States, one of the wealthiest countries on earth, has a disparity in income that is unconscionable. We live in a period of incredible abundance but are we aware of what really matters? Many of us find ourselves struggling to find clarity in a sea of possessions that occupy our physical environment and block our mental space yet whose meaning is long lost or worse, never even existed. How we manage our mounting accumulation of possessions, and the inherent wastefulness of this in terms of material, time and natural resources, has become a huge societal problem — independent of means or situation.

Taking Pause combines photographs and stories in a visual and verbal narrative that explores both the complexities and simplicities of what we value. Participants are grateful to reflect and to share in this way. Thus far what people have shared is about deep memories and identity, not monetary value.

At a time when our country feels so torn and disconnected, Taking Pause aims to reconnect and place trust with those we don’t know. Participants are asked to host me when they are able so that we can spend some time getting to know each other and so that our interaction is about more than the making of the portraits and they are more than passing subjects. As such this project at its essence is about trust. The trust of participants in me to share something that is deeply personal as well as my trust in them to offer hospitality and to welcome me into their homes.

In our current society we are hyper “connected” in our dependency on devices, yet our lives have become increasingly hermetic and disconnected. Our communication and “social” activity has become more virtual than actual. Thus a crucial part of this project is its collaborative nature, which aspires to connect with people, share stories and spend time together. In short, to take pause, to reflect.

 

 

The Concussion Diaries

“I suffered a serious concussion in April 2017. Alice fell down a rabbit hole; I just fell on the floor. The doctors forbade ‘reading, screens of any sort, and complex thinking.’ For the first four months I couldn’t even listen to music. I wondered if I might go bonkers – and then I wondered if that was complex thinking. Without the capacity for the usual distractions, I found myself in a quiet world of color and composition. In some ways my sensory experience was stripped down, but in other ways it was heightened. On the daily walks required for my recovery, I noticed every detail of spring in New Jersey – leaves unfurling, vines encircling, the patterns in moss – with a piercing intensity.

At the suggestion of a friend I started painting. I had spent a lifetime deeply engaged by twentieth-century American artists and poets. My icons were the two Helens of New York, Frankenthaler and Levitt, and the poets Robert Hass and John Ashbery. At various points my artistic energy went into making photography, writing poetry and weaving, but I had always considered painting off limits. The concussion eliminated my silly, self-imposed restraints, and painting turned the disaster into discovery.

My limited faculties when I started painting freed me from spending any time thinking about why I was painting and what I was trying to say with my work. Two of my paintings, Charlottesville and Categoría Cinco (Maria) are direct responses to current events, but the others are explorations of technique, color and form. Asking myself now about the why and the what, I am reminded of a talk I went to by the photographers Laura McPhee and Virginia Beahan. In response to a student who asked about pursuing a career in art, one of them said, ‘If you don’t need to make photographs, you won’t.’ I am still finding my way as a painter, but I can say for certain that I need to make paintings.”

-Terri Riendeau

The Periodic Table of Elements


“My work has always been inspired, to one degree or another, by my interest and attention to the Sciences.


This new body of work, THE PERIODIC TABLE OF ELEMENTS, gets to the essence of life and ecosystems by focusing on the natural “elements” themselves which make everything in the natural and synthetic worlds possible.


Congruent with this are my own principle interests with surface and materiality as each work is an experiment with materials and texture – mixing a variety of gels and other additives to the paints in order to achieve the desired effect.  This is the driving force for me with relation to this project. Each element presents a new set of characteristics that need to be studied and assessed. This pushes me to experiment with textures and material effects that speak directly to the physical properties of each element, as well as, direct the color and compositional aspects of the work.  I consider experimentation and imagination to be the two key components in all creative endeavors and these are intrinsic to the creative process in general.


For me, every work should move forward in some way – never repeating motifs or notions about plasticity in order to attain consistency. Rather, painting is first and foremost about attention and discovery – attention for the sake of understanding and discovery for the sake of expression.”

-Robert DiMatteo