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Saturday, January 19

All That You Leave Behind

[caption id="attachment_23052" align="aligncenter" width="575"] Nelson Hancock[/caption]

All That You Leave Behind, a collaboration between textile artist Diana Weymar and photographer Nelson Hancock, explores narrative and artistic interpretations of personal, everyday objects. How many of us have shopped at estate sales, driven past dilapidated houses, or visited historical sites only to find ourselves creating stories about the former owners or occupants? The urge to tell stories about what is left behind satisfies our need and desire to infuse the materiality of objects with personal meaning.

 

[caption id="attachment_23055" align="aligncenter" width="1024"] Diana Weymar[/caption]

Objects are a material evidence of life already lived. We carefully curate our own lives based on the premise that meaning can be implied, that we can control our own narratives after we have passed, and that we will be remembered through these objects. When we photograph an object or use one for artist interpretation, we are both speaking for it and for ourselves. Whether it’s a photo of a worn and decaying kitchen, embroidered text on a doll’s clothing, or an actual object, the space between it and the viewer is filled with intangible forces that have defined our lives.

 

Taking Pause

Taking Pause is a documentary, collaborative portrait project that asks people to reflect on what in their lives feels most essential. With what do we identify and connect most deeply? What truly matters to us and why?

The goal is to ask the same simple, thought-provoking question — what is irreplaceable to you — of the widest possible range of participants and to document the differences and commonalities of these reflections while engaging the spectrum of American diversity and disconnections, both political and economic.

This is a collaborative project because those who participate are more than passing subjects. In addition to sharing something of deep personal resonance, each participant also tells the story behind what they chose and engages others to take part in the project. Participants are documented in their home or place of their choosing with two distinct portraits. One of themselves, their physical selves, and an accompanying portrait of their reflective selves through what they have chosen to share. Each person is also asked to tell the story behind their selection, both orally, during the making of their portraits, and later, for the context of the long-term manifestation of the project as a book and exhibition, as a brief written text.

To advance and attain diversity in the series, each participant accepts some ownership in the project and, with thought and consideration, lays forward the collaboration by engaging one or two others to take part, helping to organically involve the spectrum of geographical regions and socioeconomic classes of the United States. The goal is to encompass the full range of our society, from the financially secure to the evicted to those who have lost everything in recent natural disasters.

Taking Pause is a collective project that aims to create an intimate glimpse of our country in a troubling and disconnected time. The United States, one of the wealthiest countries on earth, has a disparity in income that is unconscionable. We live in a period of incredible abundance but are we aware of what really matters? Many of us find ourselves struggling to find clarity in a sea of possessions that occupy our physical environment and block our mental space yet whose meaning is long lost or worse, never even existed. How we manage our mounting accumulation of possessions, and the inherent wastefulness of this in terms of material, time and natural resources, has become a huge societal problem — independent of means or situation.

Taking Pause combines photographs and stories in a visual and verbal narrative that explores both the complexities and simplicities of what we value. Participants are grateful to reflect and to share in this way. Thus far what people have shared is about deep memories and identity, not monetary value.

At a time when our country feels so torn and disconnected, Taking Pause aims to reconnect and place trust with those we don’t know. Participants are asked to host me when they are able so that we can spend some time getting to know each other and so that our interaction is about more than the making of the portraits and they are more than passing subjects. As such this project at its essence is about trust. The trust of participants in me to share something that is deeply personal as well as my trust in them to offer hospitality and to welcome me into their homes.

In our current society we are hyper “connected” in our dependency on devices, yet our lives have become increasingly hermetic and disconnected. Our communication and “social” activity has become more virtual than actual. Thus a crucial part of this project is its collaborative nature, which aspires to connect with people, share stories and spend time together. In short, to take pause, to reflect.

 

 

The Concussion Diaries

“I suffered a serious concussion in April 2017. Alice fell down a rabbit hole; I just fell on the floor. The doctors forbade ‘reading, screens of any sort, and complex thinking.’ For the first four months I couldn’t even listen to music. I wondered if I might go bonkers – and then I wondered if that was complex thinking. Without the capacity for the usual distractions, I found myself in a quiet world of color and composition. In some ways my sensory experience was stripped down, but in other ways it was heightened. On the daily walks required for my recovery, I noticed every detail of spring in New Jersey – leaves unfurling, vines encircling, the patterns in moss – with a piercing intensity.

At the suggestion of a friend I started painting. I had spent a lifetime deeply engaged by twentieth-century American artists and poets. My icons were the two Helens of New York, Frankenthaler and Levitt, and the poets Robert Hass and John Ashbery. At various points my artistic energy went into making photography, writing poetry and weaving, but I had always considered painting off limits. The concussion eliminated my silly, self-imposed restraints, and painting turned the disaster into discovery.

My limited faculties when I started painting freed me from spending any time thinking about why I was painting and what I was trying to say with my work. Two of my paintings, Charlottesville and Categoría Cinco (Maria) are direct responses to current events, but the others are explorations of technique, color and form. Asking myself now about the why and the what, I am reminded of a talk I went to by the photographers Laura McPhee and Virginia Beahan. In response to a student who asked about pursuing a career in art, one of them said, ‘If you don’t need to make photographs, you won’t.’ I am still finding my way as a painter, but I can say for certain that I need to make paintings.”

-Terri Riendeau

The Periodic Table of Elements


“My work has always been inspired, to one degree or another, by my interest and attention to the Sciences.


This new body of work, THE PERIODIC TABLE OF ELEMENTS, gets to the essence of life and ecosystems by focusing on the natural “elements” themselves which make everything in the natural and synthetic worlds possible.


Congruent with this are my own principle interests with surface and materiality as each work is an experiment with materials and texture – mixing a variety of gels and other additives to the paints in order to achieve the desired effect.  This is the driving force for me with relation to this project. Each element presents a new set of characteristics that need to be studied and assessed. This pushes me to experiment with textures and material effects that speak directly to the physical properties of each element, as well as, direct the color and compositional aspects of the work.  I consider experimentation and imagination to be the two key components in all creative endeavors and these are intrinsic to the creative process in general.


For me, every work should move forward in some way – never repeating motifs or notions about plasticity in order to attain consistency. Rather, painting is first and foremost about attention and discovery – attention for the sake of understanding and discovery for the sake of expression.”

-Robert DiMatteo

 

Sunday, January 20

All That You Leave Behind

[caption id="attachment_23052" align="aligncenter" width="575"] Nelson Hancock[/caption]

All That You Leave Behind, a collaboration between textile artist Diana Weymar and photographer Nelson Hancock, explores narrative and artistic interpretations of personal, everyday objects. How many of us have shopped at estate sales, driven past dilapidated houses, or visited historical sites only to find ourselves creating stories about the former owners or occupants? The urge to tell stories about what is left behind satisfies our need and desire to infuse the materiality of objects with personal meaning.

 

[caption id="attachment_23055" align="aligncenter" width="1024"] Diana Weymar[/caption]

Objects are a material evidence of life already lived. We carefully curate our own lives based on the premise that meaning can be implied, that we can control our own narratives after we have passed, and that we will be remembered through these objects. When we photograph an object or use one for artist interpretation, we are both speaking for it and for ourselves. Whether it’s a photo of a worn and decaying kitchen, embroidered text on a doll’s clothing, or an actual object, the space between it and the viewer is filled with intangible forces that have defined our lives.

 

Taking Pause

Taking Pause is a documentary, collaborative portrait project that asks people to reflect on what in their lives feels most essential. With what do we identify and connect most deeply? What truly matters to us and why?

The goal is to ask the same simple, thought-provoking question — what is irreplaceable to you — of the widest possible range of participants and to document the differences and commonalities of these reflections while engaging the spectrum of American diversity and disconnections, both political and economic.

This is a collaborative project because those who participate are more than passing subjects. In addition to sharing something of deep personal resonance, each participant also tells the story behind what they chose and engages others to take part in the project. Participants are documented in their home or place of their choosing with two distinct portraits. One of themselves, their physical selves, and an accompanying portrait of their reflective selves through what they have chosen to share. Each person is also asked to tell the story behind their selection, both orally, during the making of their portraits, and later, for the context of the long-term manifestation of the project as a book and exhibition, as a brief written text.

To advance and attain diversity in the series, each participant accepts some ownership in the project and, with thought and consideration, lays forward the collaboration by engaging one or two others to take part, helping to organically involve the spectrum of geographical regions and socioeconomic classes of the United States. The goal is to encompass the full range of our society, from the financially secure to the evicted to those who have lost everything in recent natural disasters.

Taking Pause is a collective project that aims to create an intimate glimpse of our country in a troubling and disconnected time. The United States, one of the wealthiest countries on earth, has a disparity in income that is unconscionable. We live in a period of incredible abundance but are we aware of what really matters? Many of us find ourselves struggling to find clarity in a sea of possessions that occupy our physical environment and block our mental space yet whose meaning is long lost or worse, never even existed. How we manage our mounting accumulation of possessions, and the inherent wastefulness of this in terms of material, time and natural resources, has become a huge societal problem — independent of means or situation.

Taking Pause combines photographs and stories in a visual and verbal narrative that explores both the complexities and simplicities of what we value. Participants are grateful to reflect and to share in this way. Thus far what people have shared is about deep memories and identity, not monetary value.

At a time when our country feels so torn and disconnected, Taking Pause aims to reconnect and place trust with those we don’t know. Participants are asked to host me when they are able so that we can spend some time getting to know each other and so that our interaction is about more than the making of the portraits and they are more than passing subjects. As such this project at its essence is about trust. The trust of participants in me to share something that is deeply personal as well as my trust in them to offer hospitality and to welcome me into their homes.

In our current society we are hyper “connected” in our dependency on devices, yet our lives have become increasingly hermetic and disconnected. Our communication and “social” activity has become more virtual than actual. Thus a crucial part of this project is its collaborative nature, which aspires to connect with people, share stories and spend time together. In short, to take pause, to reflect.

 

 

The Concussion Diaries

“I suffered a serious concussion in April 2017. Alice fell down a rabbit hole; I just fell on the floor. The doctors forbade ‘reading, screens of any sort, and complex thinking.’ For the first four months I couldn’t even listen to music. I wondered if I might go bonkers – and then I wondered if that was complex thinking. Without the capacity for the usual distractions, I found myself in a quiet world of color and composition. In some ways my sensory experience was stripped down, but in other ways it was heightened. On the daily walks required for my recovery, I noticed every detail of spring in New Jersey – leaves unfurling, vines encircling, the patterns in moss – with a piercing intensity.

At the suggestion of a friend I started painting. I had spent a lifetime deeply engaged by twentieth-century American artists and poets. My icons were the two Helens of New York, Frankenthaler and Levitt, and the poets Robert Hass and John Ashbery. At various points my artistic energy went into making photography, writing poetry and weaving, but I had always considered painting off limits. The concussion eliminated my silly, self-imposed restraints, and painting turned the disaster into discovery.

My limited faculties when I started painting freed me from spending any time thinking about why I was painting and what I was trying to say with my work. Two of my paintings, Charlottesville and Categoría Cinco (Maria) are direct responses to current events, but the others are explorations of technique, color and form. Asking myself now about the why and the what, I am reminded of a talk I went to by the photographers Laura McPhee and Virginia Beahan. In response to a student who asked about pursuing a career in art, one of them said, ‘If you don’t need to make photographs, you won’t.’ I am still finding my way as a painter, but I can say for certain that I need to make paintings.”

-Terri Riendeau

The Periodic Table of Elements


“My work has always been inspired, to one degree or another, by my interest and attention to the Sciences.


This new body of work, THE PERIODIC TABLE OF ELEMENTS, gets to the essence of life and ecosystems by focusing on the natural “elements” themselves which make everything in the natural and synthetic worlds possible.


Congruent with this are my own principle interests with surface and materiality as each work is an experiment with materials and texture – mixing a variety of gels and other additives to the paints in order to achieve the desired effect.  This is the driving force for me with relation to this project. Each element presents a new set of characteristics that need to be studied and assessed. This pushes me to experiment with textures and material effects that speak directly to the physical properties of each element, as well as, direct the color and compositional aspects of the work.  I consider experimentation and imagination to be the two key components in all creative endeavors and these are intrinsic to the creative process in general.


For me, every work should move forward in some way – never repeating motifs or notions about plasticity in order to attain consistency. Rather, painting is first and foremost about attention and discovery – attention for the sake of understanding and discovery for the sake of expression.”

-Robert DiMatteo

 

Monday, January 21

Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Day Community Event

- Free and Open to the Public!

Join the Arts Council of Princeton and Paul Robeson House as we celebrate the life and legacy of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. with a day of music, interactive workshops, and discussions as they relate to Dr. King’s life, teachings and civic engagement.

 

SCHEDULE OF ACTIVITIES

9-10am Community Breakfast
sponsored by Princeton University
featuring speakers Tracy K. Smith, National Poet Laureate and Rev. Lukata Mjumbe, recently-appointed pastor at Witherspoon Street Presbyterian Church

10-11:30am Hands On!
Art and history activities with the Historical Society of Princeton and the Bayard Rustin Center for Social Justice
Canned food drive with the Princeton Family YMCA – bring an item!
Story circle with JaZams

11:30am-12pm Gospel Performance
by the First Baptist Church Choir

This free community event is held in collaboration with the Paul Robeson House, Princeton University, JaZams, Princeton Family YMCA, the Historical Society of Princeton, and the Bayard Rustin Center for Social Justice.

 

Help us plan by RSVP’ing via EventBrite!

 

 

All That You Leave Behind

[caption id="attachment_23052" align="aligncenter" width="575"] Nelson Hancock[/caption]

All That You Leave Behind, a collaboration between textile artist Diana Weymar and photographer Nelson Hancock, explores narrative and artistic interpretations of personal, everyday objects. How many of us have shopped at estate sales, driven past dilapidated houses, or visited historical sites only to find ourselves creating stories about the former owners or occupants? The urge to tell stories about what is left behind satisfies our need and desire to infuse the materiality of objects with personal meaning.

 

[caption id="attachment_23055" align="aligncenter" width="1024"] Diana Weymar[/caption]

Objects are a material evidence of life already lived. We carefully curate our own lives based on the premise that meaning can be implied, that we can control our own narratives after we have passed, and that we will be remembered through these objects. When we photograph an object or use one for artist interpretation, we are both speaking for it and for ourselves. Whether it’s a photo of a worn and decaying kitchen, embroidered text on a doll’s clothing, or an actual object, the space between it and the viewer is filled with intangible forces that have defined our lives.

 

Taking Pause

Taking Pause is a documentary, collaborative portrait project that asks people to reflect on what in their lives feels most essential. With what do we identify and connect most deeply? What truly matters to us and why?

The goal is to ask the same simple, thought-provoking question — what is irreplaceable to you — of the widest possible range of participants and to document the differences and commonalities of these reflections while engaging the spectrum of American diversity and disconnections, both political and economic.

This is a collaborative project because those who participate are more than passing subjects. In addition to sharing something of deep personal resonance, each participant also tells the story behind what they chose and engages others to take part in the project. Participants are documented in their home or place of their choosing with two distinct portraits. One of themselves, their physical selves, and an accompanying portrait of their reflective selves through what they have chosen to share. Each person is also asked to tell the story behind their selection, both orally, during the making of their portraits, and later, for the context of the long-term manifestation of the project as a book and exhibition, as a brief written text.

To advance and attain diversity in the series, each participant accepts some ownership in the project and, with thought and consideration, lays forward the collaboration by engaging one or two others to take part, helping to organically involve the spectrum of geographical regions and socioeconomic classes of the United States. The goal is to encompass the full range of our society, from the financially secure to the evicted to those who have lost everything in recent natural disasters.

Taking Pause is a collective project that aims to create an intimate glimpse of our country in a troubling and disconnected time. The United States, one of the wealthiest countries on earth, has a disparity in income that is unconscionable. We live in a period of incredible abundance but are we aware of what really matters? Many of us find ourselves struggling to find clarity in a sea of possessions that occupy our physical environment and block our mental space yet whose meaning is long lost or worse, never even existed. How we manage our mounting accumulation of possessions, and the inherent wastefulness of this in terms of material, time and natural resources, has become a huge societal problem — independent of means or situation.

Taking Pause combines photographs and stories in a visual and verbal narrative that explores both the complexities and simplicities of what we value. Participants are grateful to reflect and to share in this way. Thus far what people have shared is about deep memories and identity, not monetary value.

At a time when our country feels so torn and disconnected, Taking Pause aims to reconnect and place trust with those we don’t know. Participants are asked to host me when they are able so that we can spend some time getting to know each other and so that our interaction is about more than the making of the portraits and they are more than passing subjects. As such this project at its essence is about trust. The trust of participants in me to share something that is deeply personal as well as my trust in them to offer hospitality and to welcome me into their homes.

In our current society we are hyper “connected” in our dependency on devices, yet our lives have become increasingly hermetic and disconnected. Our communication and “social” activity has become more virtual than actual. Thus a crucial part of this project is its collaborative nature, which aspires to connect with people, share stories and spend time together. In short, to take pause, to reflect.

 

 

The Concussion Diaries

“I suffered a serious concussion in April 2017. Alice fell down a rabbit hole; I just fell on the floor. The doctors forbade ‘reading, screens of any sort, and complex thinking.’ For the first four months I couldn’t even listen to music. I wondered if I might go bonkers – and then I wondered if that was complex thinking. Without the capacity for the usual distractions, I found myself in a quiet world of color and composition. In some ways my sensory experience was stripped down, but in other ways it was heightened. On the daily walks required for my recovery, I noticed every detail of spring in New Jersey – leaves unfurling, vines encircling, the patterns in moss – with a piercing intensity.

At the suggestion of a friend I started painting. I had spent a lifetime deeply engaged by twentieth-century American artists and poets. My icons were the two Helens of New York, Frankenthaler and Levitt, and the poets Robert Hass and John Ashbery. At various points my artistic energy went into making photography, writing poetry and weaving, but I had always considered painting off limits. The concussion eliminated my silly, self-imposed restraints, and painting turned the disaster into discovery.

My limited faculties when I started painting freed me from spending any time thinking about why I was painting and what I was trying to say with my work. Two of my paintings, Charlottesville and Categoría Cinco (Maria) are direct responses to current events, but the others are explorations of technique, color and form. Asking myself now about the why and the what, I am reminded of a talk I went to by the photographers Laura McPhee and Virginia Beahan. In response to a student who asked about pursuing a career in art, one of them said, ‘If you don’t need to make photographs, you won’t.’ I am still finding my way as a painter, but I can say for certain that I need to make paintings.”

-Terri Riendeau

The Periodic Table of Elements


“My work has always been inspired, to one degree or another, by my interest and attention to the Sciences.


This new body of work, THE PERIODIC TABLE OF ELEMENTS, gets to the essence of life and ecosystems by focusing on the natural “elements” themselves which make everything in the natural and synthetic worlds possible.


Congruent with this are my own principle interests with surface and materiality as each work is an experiment with materials and texture – mixing a variety of gels and other additives to the paints in order to achieve the desired effect.  This is the driving force for me with relation to this project. Each element presents a new set of characteristics that need to be studied and assessed. This pushes me to experiment with textures and material effects that speak directly to the physical properties of each element, as well as, direct the color and compositional aspects of the work.  I consider experimentation and imagination to be the two key components in all creative endeavors and these are intrinsic to the creative process in general.


For me, every work should move forward in some way – never repeating motifs or notions about plasticity in order to attain consistency. Rather, painting is first and foremost about attention and discovery – attention for the sake of understanding and discovery for the sake of expression.”

-Robert DiMatteo

 

Tuesday, January 22

All That You Leave Behind

[caption id="attachment_23052" align="aligncenter" width="575"] Nelson Hancock[/caption]

All That You Leave Behind, a collaboration between textile artist Diana Weymar and photographer Nelson Hancock, explores narrative and artistic interpretations of personal, everyday objects. How many of us have shopped at estate sales, driven past dilapidated houses, or visited historical sites only to find ourselves creating stories about the former owners or occupants? The urge to tell stories about what is left behind satisfies our need and desire to infuse the materiality of objects with personal meaning.

 

[caption id="attachment_23055" align="aligncenter" width="1024"] Diana Weymar[/caption]

Objects are a material evidence of life already lived. We carefully curate our own lives based on the premise that meaning can be implied, that we can control our own narratives after we have passed, and that we will be remembered through these objects. When we photograph an object or use one for artist interpretation, we are both speaking for it and for ourselves. Whether it’s a photo of a worn and decaying kitchen, embroidered text on a doll’s clothing, or an actual object, the space between it and the viewer is filled with intangible forces that have defined our lives.

 

Taking Pause

Taking Pause is a documentary, collaborative portrait project that asks people to reflect on what in their lives feels most essential. With what do we identify and connect most deeply? What truly matters to us and why?

The goal is to ask the same simple, thought-provoking question — what is irreplaceable to you — of the widest possible range of participants and to document the differences and commonalities of these reflections while engaging the spectrum of American diversity and disconnections, both political and economic.

This is a collaborative project because those who participate are more than passing subjects. In addition to sharing something of deep personal resonance, each participant also tells the story behind what they chose and engages others to take part in the project. Participants are documented in their home or place of their choosing with two distinct portraits. One of themselves, their physical selves, and an accompanying portrait of their reflective selves through what they have chosen to share. Each person is also asked to tell the story behind their selection, both orally, during the making of their portraits, and later, for the context of the long-term manifestation of the project as a book and exhibition, as a brief written text.

To advance and attain diversity in the series, each participant accepts some ownership in the project and, with thought and consideration, lays forward the collaboration by engaging one or two others to take part, helping to organically involve the spectrum of geographical regions and socioeconomic classes of the United States. The goal is to encompass the full range of our society, from the financially secure to the evicted to those who have lost everything in recent natural disasters.

Taking Pause is a collective project that aims to create an intimate glimpse of our country in a troubling and disconnected time. The United States, one of the wealthiest countries on earth, has a disparity in income that is unconscionable. We live in a period of incredible abundance but are we aware of what really matters? Many of us find ourselves struggling to find clarity in a sea of possessions that occupy our physical environment and block our mental space yet whose meaning is long lost or worse, never even existed. How we manage our mounting accumulation of possessions, and the inherent wastefulness of this in terms of material, time and natural resources, has become a huge societal problem — independent of means or situation.

Taking Pause combines photographs and stories in a visual and verbal narrative that explores both the complexities and simplicities of what we value. Participants are grateful to reflect and to share in this way. Thus far what people have shared is about deep memories and identity, not monetary value.

At a time when our country feels so torn and disconnected, Taking Pause aims to reconnect and place trust with those we don’t know. Participants are asked to host me when they are able so that we can spend some time getting to know each other and so that our interaction is about more than the making of the portraits and they are more than passing subjects. As such this project at its essence is about trust. The trust of participants in me to share something that is deeply personal as well as my trust in them to offer hospitality and to welcome me into their homes.

In our current society we are hyper “connected” in our dependency on devices, yet our lives have become increasingly hermetic and disconnected. Our communication and “social” activity has become more virtual than actual. Thus a crucial part of this project is its collaborative nature, which aspires to connect with people, share stories and spend time together. In short, to take pause, to reflect.

 

 

The Concussion Diaries

“I suffered a serious concussion in April 2017. Alice fell down a rabbit hole; I just fell on the floor. The doctors forbade ‘reading, screens of any sort, and complex thinking.’ For the first four months I couldn’t even listen to music. I wondered if I might go bonkers – and then I wondered if that was complex thinking. Without the capacity for the usual distractions, I found myself in a quiet world of color and composition. In some ways my sensory experience was stripped down, but in other ways it was heightened. On the daily walks required for my recovery, I noticed every detail of spring in New Jersey – leaves unfurling, vines encircling, the patterns in moss – with a piercing intensity.

At the suggestion of a friend I started painting. I had spent a lifetime deeply engaged by twentieth-century American artists and poets. My icons were the two Helens of New York, Frankenthaler and Levitt, and the poets Robert Hass and John Ashbery. At various points my artistic energy went into making photography, writing poetry and weaving, but I had always considered painting off limits. The concussion eliminated my silly, self-imposed restraints, and painting turned the disaster into discovery.

My limited faculties when I started painting freed me from spending any time thinking about why I was painting and what I was trying to say with my work. Two of my paintings, Charlottesville and Categoría Cinco (Maria) are direct responses to current events, but the others are explorations of technique, color and form. Asking myself now about the why and the what, I am reminded of a talk I went to by the photographers Laura McPhee and Virginia Beahan. In response to a student who asked about pursuing a career in art, one of them said, ‘If you don’t need to make photographs, you won’t.’ I am still finding my way as a painter, but I can say for certain that I need to make paintings.”

-Terri Riendeau

The Periodic Table of Elements


“My work has always been inspired, to one degree or another, by my interest and attention to the Sciences.


This new body of work, THE PERIODIC TABLE OF ELEMENTS, gets to the essence of life and ecosystems by focusing on the natural “elements” themselves which make everything in the natural and synthetic worlds possible.


Congruent with this are my own principle interests with surface and materiality as each work is an experiment with materials and texture – mixing a variety of gels and other additives to the paints in order to achieve the desired effect.  This is the driving force for me with relation to this project. Each element presents a new set of characteristics that need to be studied and assessed. This pushes me to experiment with textures and material effects that speak directly to the physical properties of each element, as well as, direct the color and compositional aspects of the work.  I consider experimentation and imagination to be the two key components in all creative endeavors and these are intrinsic to the creative process in general.


For me, every work should move forward in some way – never repeating motifs or notions about plasticity in order to attain consistency. Rather, painting is first and foremost about attention and discovery – attention for the sake of understanding and discovery for the sake of expression.”

-Robert DiMatteo

 

Wednesday, January 23

All That You Leave Behind

[caption id="attachment_23052" align="aligncenter" width="575"] Nelson Hancock[/caption]

All That You Leave Behind, a collaboration between textile artist Diana Weymar and photographer Nelson Hancock, explores narrative and artistic interpretations of personal, everyday objects. How many of us have shopped at estate sales, driven past dilapidated houses, or visited historical sites only to find ourselves creating stories about the former owners or occupants? The urge to tell stories about what is left behind satisfies our need and desire to infuse the materiality of objects with personal meaning.

 

[caption id="attachment_23055" align="aligncenter" width="1024"] Diana Weymar[/caption]

Objects are a material evidence of life already lived. We carefully curate our own lives based on the premise that meaning can be implied, that we can control our own narratives after we have passed, and that we will be remembered through these objects. When we photograph an object or use one for artist interpretation, we are both speaking for it and for ourselves. Whether it’s a photo of a worn and decaying kitchen, embroidered text on a doll’s clothing, or an actual object, the space between it and the viewer is filled with intangible forces that have defined our lives.

 

Taking Pause

Taking Pause is a documentary, collaborative portrait project that asks people to reflect on what in their lives feels most essential. With what do we identify and connect most deeply? What truly matters to us and why?

The goal is to ask the same simple, thought-provoking question — what is irreplaceable to you — of the widest possible range of participants and to document the differences and commonalities of these reflections while engaging the spectrum of American diversity and disconnections, both political and economic.

This is a collaborative project because those who participate are more than passing subjects. In addition to sharing something of deep personal resonance, each participant also tells the story behind what they chose and engages others to take part in the project. Participants are documented in their home or place of their choosing with two distinct portraits. One of themselves, their physical selves, and an accompanying portrait of their reflective selves through what they have chosen to share. Each person is also asked to tell the story behind their selection, both orally, during the making of their portraits, and later, for the context of the long-term manifestation of the project as a book and exhibition, as a brief written text.

To advance and attain diversity in the series, each participant accepts some ownership in the project and, with thought and consideration, lays forward the collaboration by engaging one or two others to take part, helping to organically involve the spectrum of geographical regions and socioeconomic classes of the United States. The goal is to encompass the full range of our society, from the financially secure to the evicted to those who have lost everything in recent natural disasters.

Taking Pause is a collective project that aims to create an intimate glimpse of our country in a troubling and disconnected time. The United States, one of the wealthiest countries on earth, has a disparity in income that is unconscionable. We live in a period of incredible abundance but are we aware of what really matters? Many of us find ourselves struggling to find clarity in a sea of possessions that occupy our physical environment and block our mental space yet whose meaning is long lost or worse, never even existed. How we manage our mounting accumulation of possessions, and the inherent wastefulness of this in terms of material, time and natural resources, has become a huge societal problem — independent of means or situation.

Taking Pause combines photographs and stories in a visual and verbal narrative that explores both the complexities and simplicities of what we value. Participants are grateful to reflect and to share in this way. Thus far what people have shared is about deep memories and identity, not monetary value.

At a time when our country feels so torn and disconnected, Taking Pause aims to reconnect and place trust with those we don’t know. Participants are asked to host me when they are able so that we can spend some time getting to know each other and so that our interaction is about more than the making of the portraits and they are more than passing subjects. As such this project at its essence is about trust. The trust of participants in me to share something that is deeply personal as well as my trust in them to offer hospitality and to welcome me into their homes.

In our current society we are hyper “connected” in our dependency on devices, yet our lives have become increasingly hermetic and disconnected. Our communication and “social” activity has become more virtual than actual. Thus a crucial part of this project is its collaborative nature, which aspires to connect with people, share stories and spend time together. In short, to take pause, to reflect.

 

 

The Concussion Diaries

“I suffered a serious concussion in April 2017. Alice fell down a rabbit hole; I just fell on the floor. The doctors forbade ‘reading, screens of any sort, and complex thinking.’ For the first four months I couldn’t even listen to music. I wondered if I might go bonkers – and then I wondered if that was complex thinking. Without the capacity for the usual distractions, I found myself in a quiet world of color and composition. In some ways my sensory experience was stripped down, but in other ways it was heightened. On the daily walks required for my recovery, I noticed every detail of spring in New Jersey – leaves unfurling, vines encircling, the patterns in moss – with a piercing intensity.

At the suggestion of a friend I started painting. I had spent a lifetime deeply engaged by twentieth-century American artists and poets. My icons were the two Helens of New York, Frankenthaler and Levitt, and the poets Robert Hass and John Ashbery. At various points my artistic energy went into making photography, writing poetry and weaving, but I had always considered painting off limits. The concussion eliminated my silly, self-imposed restraints, and painting turned the disaster into discovery.

My limited faculties when I started painting freed me from spending any time thinking about why I was painting and what I was trying to say with my work. Two of my paintings, Charlottesville and Categoría Cinco (Maria) are direct responses to current events, but the others are explorations of technique, color and form. Asking myself now about the why and the what, I am reminded of a talk I went to by the photographers Laura McPhee and Virginia Beahan. In response to a student who asked about pursuing a career in art, one of them said, ‘If you don’t need to make photographs, you won’t.’ I am still finding my way as a painter, but I can say for certain that I need to make paintings.”

-Terri Riendeau

The Periodic Table of Elements


“My work has always been inspired, to one degree or another, by my interest and attention to the Sciences.


This new body of work, THE PERIODIC TABLE OF ELEMENTS, gets to the essence of life and ecosystems by focusing on the natural “elements” themselves which make everything in the natural and synthetic worlds possible.


Congruent with this are my own principle interests with surface and materiality as each work is an experiment with materials and texture – mixing a variety of gels and other additives to the paints in order to achieve the desired effect.  This is the driving force for me with relation to this project. Each element presents a new set of characteristics that need to be studied and assessed. This pushes me to experiment with textures and material effects that speak directly to the physical properties of each element, as well as, direct the color and compositional aspects of the work.  I consider experimentation and imagination to be the two key components in all creative endeavors and these are intrinsic to the creative process in general.


For me, every work should move forward in some way – never repeating motifs or notions about plasticity in order to attain consistency. Rather, painting is first and foremost about attention and discovery – attention for the sake of understanding and discovery for the sake of expression.”

-Robert DiMatteo

 

Thursday, January 24

All That You Leave Behind

[caption id="attachment_23052" align="aligncenter" width="575"] Nelson Hancock[/caption]

All That You Leave Behind, a collaboration between textile artist Diana Weymar and photographer Nelson Hancock, explores narrative and artistic interpretations of personal, everyday objects. How many of us have shopped at estate sales, driven past dilapidated houses, or visited historical sites only to find ourselves creating stories about the former owners or occupants? The urge to tell stories about what is left behind satisfies our need and desire to infuse the materiality of objects with personal meaning.

 

[caption id="attachment_23055" align="aligncenter" width="1024"] Diana Weymar[/caption]

Objects are a material evidence of life already lived. We carefully curate our own lives based on the premise that meaning can be implied, that we can control our own narratives after we have passed, and that we will be remembered through these objects. When we photograph an object or use one for artist interpretation, we are both speaking for it and for ourselves. Whether it’s a photo of a worn and decaying kitchen, embroidered text on a doll’s clothing, or an actual object, the space between it and the viewer is filled with intangible forces that have defined our lives.

 

Taking Pause

Taking Pause is a documentary, collaborative portrait project that asks people to reflect on what in their lives feels most essential. With what do we identify and connect most deeply? What truly matters to us and why?

The goal is to ask the same simple, thought-provoking question — what is irreplaceable to you — of the widest possible range of participants and to document the differences and commonalities of these reflections while engaging the spectrum of American diversity and disconnections, both political and economic.

This is a collaborative project because those who participate are more than passing subjects. In addition to sharing something of deep personal resonance, each participant also tells the story behind what they chose and engages others to take part in the project. Participants are documented in their home or place of their choosing with two distinct portraits. One of themselves, their physical selves, and an accompanying portrait of their reflective selves through what they have chosen to share. Each person is also asked to tell the story behind their selection, both orally, during the making of their portraits, and later, for the context of the long-term manifestation of the project as a book and exhibition, as a brief written text.

To advance and attain diversity in the series, each participant accepts some ownership in the project and, with thought and consideration, lays forward the collaboration by engaging one or two others to take part, helping to organically involve the spectrum of geographical regions and socioeconomic classes of the United States. The goal is to encompass the full range of our society, from the financially secure to the evicted to those who have lost everything in recent natural disasters.

Taking Pause is a collective project that aims to create an intimate glimpse of our country in a troubling and disconnected time. The United States, one of the wealthiest countries on earth, has a disparity in income that is unconscionable. We live in a period of incredible abundance but are we aware of what really matters? Many of us find ourselves struggling to find clarity in a sea of possessions that occupy our physical environment and block our mental space yet whose meaning is long lost or worse, never even existed. How we manage our mounting accumulation of possessions, and the inherent wastefulness of this in terms of material, time and natural resources, has become a huge societal problem — independent of means or situation.

Taking Pause combines photographs and stories in a visual and verbal narrative that explores both the complexities and simplicities of what we value. Participants are grateful to reflect and to share in this way. Thus far what people have shared is about deep memories and identity, not monetary value.

At a time when our country feels so torn and disconnected, Taking Pause aims to reconnect and place trust with those we don’t know. Participants are asked to host me when they are able so that we can spend some time getting to know each other and so that our interaction is about more than the making of the portraits and they are more than passing subjects. As such this project at its essence is about trust. The trust of participants in me to share something that is deeply personal as well as my trust in them to offer hospitality and to welcome me into their homes.

In our current society we are hyper “connected” in our dependency on devices, yet our lives have become increasingly hermetic and disconnected. Our communication and “social” activity has become more virtual than actual. Thus a crucial part of this project is its collaborative nature, which aspires to connect with people, share stories and spend time together. In short, to take pause, to reflect.

 

 

The Concussion Diaries

“I suffered a serious concussion in April 2017. Alice fell down a rabbit hole; I just fell on the floor. The doctors forbade ‘reading, screens of any sort, and complex thinking.’ For the first four months I couldn’t even listen to music. I wondered if I might go bonkers – and then I wondered if that was complex thinking. Without the capacity for the usual distractions, I found myself in a quiet world of color and composition. In some ways my sensory experience was stripped down, but in other ways it was heightened. On the daily walks required for my recovery, I noticed every detail of spring in New Jersey – leaves unfurling, vines encircling, the patterns in moss – with a piercing intensity.

At the suggestion of a friend I started painting. I had spent a lifetime deeply engaged by twentieth-century American artists and poets. My icons were the two Helens of New York, Frankenthaler and Levitt, and the poets Robert Hass and John Ashbery. At various points my artistic energy went into making photography, writing poetry and weaving, but I had always considered painting off limits. The concussion eliminated my silly, self-imposed restraints, and painting turned the disaster into discovery.

My limited faculties when I started painting freed me from spending any time thinking about why I was painting and what I was trying to say with my work. Two of my paintings, Charlottesville and Categoría Cinco (Maria) are direct responses to current events, but the others are explorations of technique, color and form. Asking myself now about the why and the what, I am reminded of a talk I went to by the photographers Laura McPhee and Virginia Beahan. In response to a student who asked about pursuing a career in art, one of them said, ‘If you don’t need to make photographs, you won’t.’ I am still finding my way as a painter, but I can say for certain that I need to make paintings.”

-Terri Riendeau

The Periodic Table of Elements


“My work has always been inspired, to one degree or another, by my interest and attention to the Sciences.


This new body of work, THE PERIODIC TABLE OF ELEMENTS, gets to the essence of life and ecosystems by focusing on the natural “elements” themselves which make everything in the natural and synthetic worlds possible.


Congruent with this are my own principle interests with surface and materiality as each work is an experiment with materials and texture – mixing a variety of gels and other additives to the paints in order to achieve the desired effect.  This is the driving force for me with relation to this project. Each element presents a new set of characteristics that need to be studied and assessed. This pushes me to experiment with textures and material effects that speak directly to the physical properties of each element, as well as, direct the color and compositional aspects of the work.  I consider experimentation and imagination to be the two key components in all creative endeavors and these are intrinsic to the creative process in general.


For me, every work should move forward in some way – never repeating motifs or notions about plasticity in order to attain consistency. Rather, painting is first and foremost about attention and discovery – attention for the sake of understanding and discovery for the sake of expression.”

-Robert DiMatteo

 

Friday, January 25

Design Your Next Chapter: Navigating Turning Tides - An Evening with Debbie Travis & Helen O'Shea

- Free and Open to the Public!

In a perfect beginning for the new year, Princeton Public Library & White Butterfly Music present: Design Your Next Chapter: Navigating Turning Tides  – An Evening with Debbie Travis & Helen O’Shea.

What happens when  a couple of longtime soul friends bring you story songs from a life changing project about reinventing yourself as well as a new best selling book that shows you, through the stories of others, how to do just that, beginning one small step at a time?

The connection here is the power of story – one woman’s real life story of how she reinvented herself right here in Princeton and the other woman’s personal story, as well as those she has carefully collected in Canada, Tuscany and London from the women she meets and empowers in her busy life as a TV producer and host of the most wonderful women’s retreats imaginable at her Tuscan Getaway…

At this unique event, there is a chance that you too will reawaken long hidden dreams for your next chapter… or even that you will invent new dreams that may lead to the tides turning for you this year… And don’t we all really need to rediscover that tiny part of ourselves where we thought that there was nothing we could not do? It is never too late to dream… or to live out your dream… so let’s all get down to it together!

ABOUT DEBBIE TRAVIS

A few years ago, Debbie Travis realized that she was no longer challenged by her wildly successful TV career and she was so busy she was missing out on the people and things that made her happy. She dared to dream about a whole new direction in life–a plan to turn a 13th-century farmhouse in Tuscany into a unique hotel and retreat for people who need a change as much as she did. And now, after a crazy amount of work, she is not only living that dream but sharing it with others.

Her new book draws directly on her own experiences (when she started, Debbie could barely make a bed, let alone run a hotel in a foreign county) and the uplifting stories of personal u-turns shared by women who have come to her retreats. Debbie’s “commandments” will inspire women (and men) who have lost track of who they are or what they want to be; who are going through the motions of a career that doesn’t satisfy them anymore; who are wondering what to do with themselves now that their kids are gone or their marriage is over. On every page, Debbie shares the tools that helped her transform her life, and her example, her wit and her common sense advice will help motivate anyone who finds themselves standing at a crossroads wondering “What’s next for me?”

So if you feel stuck with no idea what you should do next, lifestyle celebrity and TV pioneer Debbie Travis’s new book is for you. Drawing on the tough (sometimes hilarious) lessons Debbie learned in her own leap into a new way of living, and a multitude of stories, tips and ideas to jumpstart your dreams, she’s created an inspiring roadmap for change.

ABOUT HELEN O’SHEA

Helen O’Shea has just released her first full CD Turning Tides…, a collection of original songs about relationships, love, loss, motherhood, grief and friendship. Helen is originally from Limerick in Ireland. In 1995, she moved to the USA & then Canada with her husband – their children were born in Montreal – before moving back to the USA to settle in Princeton, NJ in 2011.

At that time, after a career in medicine spanning 4 countries – Ireland, UK , Canada, USA –  in the field of Obstetrics & Gynecology  including clinical care, perinatal research & medical student education, Helen’s children asked her to stay home for a while.  Paul suggested that she revisit her long standing love of singing during the break and she gradually began performing locally, as well as writing poetry and songs.

In 2014, Helen started working with Music Mentor & Producer – 2 time Grammy winner – Marc Swersky and her music career took off in a new direction. In 2016, their first writing collaboration – “Moments” – was selected for inclusion on the Cape May Singer Songwriters Festival CD. Then Helen released “Mama Told You…” her first EP of 5 original songs & her unique take on “Simple Man” by Lynyrd Skynyrd – a song she learned for her son.

Since then, Helen has put together a Celtic band called “Shenanigans” dedicated to performing the traditional songs of Ireland as well as her own band “The Shanakees” (derived from the Gaelic word for “storyteller” – “seanachai”) performing her original songs as well as duet arrangements of covers in the “AmeriCeltiCana” style – Americana with a Celtic twist!

It truly takes a village and Helen has met many wonderful people on her new musical journey who have helped her to become a better singer, songwriter & show producer – the greatest of these is Marc Swersky, her co-writer & producer on Turning Tides… and many more songs to come! #ItsNeverTooLateToDream

All That You Leave Behind

[caption id="attachment_23052" align="aligncenter" width="575"] Nelson Hancock[/caption]

All That You Leave Behind, a collaboration between textile artist Diana Weymar and photographer Nelson Hancock, explores narrative and artistic interpretations of personal, everyday objects. How many of us have shopped at estate sales, driven past dilapidated houses, or visited historical sites only to find ourselves creating stories about the former owners or occupants? The urge to tell stories about what is left behind satisfies our need and desire to infuse the materiality of objects with personal meaning.

 

[caption id="attachment_23055" align="aligncenter" width="1024"] Diana Weymar[/caption]

Objects are a material evidence of life already lived. We carefully curate our own lives based on the premise that meaning can be implied, that we can control our own narratives after we have passed, and that we will be remembered through these objects. When we photograph an object or use one for artist interpretation, we are both speaking for it and for ourselves. Whether it’s a photo of a worn and decaying kitchen, embroidered text on a doll’s clothing, or an actual object, the space between it and the viewer is filled with intangible forces that have defined our lives.

 

Taking Pause

Taking Pause is a documentary, collaborative portrait project that asks people to reflect on what in their lives feels most essential. With what do we identify and connect most deeply? What truly matters to us and why?

The goal is to ask the same simple, thought-provoking question — what is irreplaceable to you — of the widest possible range of participants and to document the differences and commonalities of these reflections while engaging the spectrum of American diversity and disconnections, both political and economic.

This is a collaborative project because those who participate are more than passing subjects. In addition to sharing something of deep personal resonance, each participant also tells the story behind what they chose and engages others to take part in the project. Participants are documented in their home or place of their choosing with two distinct portraits. One of themselves, their physical selves, and an accompanying portrait of their reflective selves through what they have chosen to share. Each person is also asked to tell the story behind their selection, both orally, during the making of their portraits, and later, for the context of the long-term manifestation of the project as a book and exhibition, as a brief written text.

To advance and attain diversity in the series, each participant accepts some ownership in the project and, with thought and consideration, lays forward the collaboration by engaging one or two others to take part, helping to organically involve the spectrum of geographical regions and socioeconomic classes of the United States. The goal is to encompass the full range of our society, from the financially secure to the evicted to those who have lost everything in recent natural disasters.

Taking Pause is a collective project that aims to create an intimate glimpse of our country in a troubling and disconnected time. The United States, one of the wealthiest countries on earth, has a disparity in income that is unconscionable. We live in a period of incredible abundance but are we aware of what really matters? Many of us find ourselves struggling to find clarity in a sea of possessions that occupy our physical environment and block our mental space yet whose meaning is long lost or worse, never even existed. How we manage our mounting accumulation of possessions, and the inherent wastefulness of this in terms of material, time and natural resources, has become a huge societal problem — independent of means or situation.

Taking Pause combines photographs and stories in a visual and verbal narrative that explores both the complexities and simplicities of what we value. Participants are grateful to reflect and to share in this way. Thus far what people have shared is about deep memories and identity, not monetary value.

At a time when our country feels so torn and disconnected, Taking Pause aims to reconnect and place trust with those we don’t know. Participants are asked to host me when they are able so that we can spend some time getting to know each other and so that our interaction is about more than the making of the portraits and they are more than passing subjects. As such this project at its essence is about trust. The trust of participants in me to share something that is deeply personal as well as my trust in them to offer hospitality and to welcome me into their homes.

In our current society we are hyper “connected” in our dependency on devices, yet our lives have become increasingly hermetic and disconnected. Our communication and “social” activity has become more virtual than actual. Thus a crucial part of this project is its collaborative nature, which aspires to connect with people, share stories and spend time together. In short, to take pause, to reflect.

 

 

The Concussion Diaries

“I suffered a serious concussion in April 2017. Alice fell down a rabbit hole; I just fell on the floor. The doctors forbade ‘reading, screens of any sort, and complex thinking.’ For the first four months I couldn’t even listen to music. I wondered if I might go bonkers – and then I wondered if that was complex thinking. Without the capacity for the usual distractions, I found myself in a quiet world of color and composition. In some ways my sensory experience was stripped down, but in other ways it was heightened. On the daily walks required for my recovery, I noticed every detail of spring in New Jersey – leaves unfurling, vines encircling, the patterns in moss – with a piercing intensity.

At the suggestion of a friend I started painting. I had spent a lifetime deeply engaged by twentieth-century American artists and poets. My icons were the two Helens of New York, Frankenthaler and Levitt, and the poets Robert Hass and John Ashbery. At various points my artistic energy went into making photography, writing poetry and weaving, but I had always considered painting off limits. The concussion eliminated my silly, self-imposed restraints, and painting turned the disaster into discovery.

My limited faculties when I started painting freed me from spending any time thinking about why I was painting and what I was trying to say with my work. Two of my paintings, Charlottesville and Categoría Cinco (Maria) are direct responses to current events, but the others are explorations of technique, color and form. Asking myself now about the why and the what, I am reminded of a talk I went to by the photographers Laura McPhee and Virginia Beahan. In response to a student who asked about pursuing a career in art, one of them said, ‘If you don’t need to make photographs, you won’t.’ I am still finding my way as a painter, but I can say for certain that I need to make paintings.”

-Terri Riendeau

The Periodic Table of Elements


“My work has always been inspired, to one degree or another, by my interest and attention to the Sciences.


This new body of work, THE PERIODIC TABLE OF ELEMENTS, gets to the essence of life and ecosystems by focusing on the natural “elements” themselves which make everything in the natural and synthetic worlds possible.


Congruent with this are my own principle interests with surface and materiality as each work is an experiment with materials and texture – mixing a variety of gels and other additives to the paints in order to achieve the desired effect.  This is the driving force for me with relation to this project. Each element presents a new set of characteristics that need to be studied and assessed. This pushes me to experiment with textures and material effects that speak directly to the physical properties of each element, as well as, direct the color and compositional aspects of the work.  I consider experimentation and imagination to be the two key components in all creative endeavors and these are intrinsic to the creative process in general.


For me, every work should move forward in some way – never repeating motifs or notions about plasticity in order to attain consistency. Rather, painting is first and foremost about attention and discovery – attention for the sake of understanding and discovery for the sake of expression.”

-Robert DiMatteo