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Friday, March 22

Cabernet Cabaret - Comedy Tonight!

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[caption id="attachment_23654" align="aligncenter" width="1024"] Join the ACP on Friday, March 22 for Cabernet Cabaret![/caption]
 

The Arts Council of Princeton presents the seventh annual Cabernet Cabaret, an intimate cabernet-infused performance in the ACP’s Solley Theater. Join Sarah Donner and special guests Mark Applegate, Matthew Campbell, and Rebecca Mullaney for a night of live music filled with drama, romance and comedy.

It’s easy to get one’s heart lost in a moody ballad. Every great tragedy needs a great comedic song to lighten the load. A hilarious ditty is a challenge to write because it relies on wit, timing, knowing your audience, and a fantastic actor to pull it off. We are just on the cusp of spring. We have made it through the grey of winter, and what better way to celebrate than with music to make you buckle with laughter. From The Muppet Show to Monty Python, we have prepared a program of funny, zippy, and yes, naughty tunes to cure your winter blues!

Please join us at 7pm for a tapas reception catered by Jules Boutique Catering and Events. The Cabernet Cabaret performance begins at 8pm.

Tickets to Cabernet Cabaret include a tapas reception, one wine ticket, and the live performance.

[caption id="attachment_23612" align="aligncenter" width="170"] Click to purchase Cabernet Cabaret tickets![/caption]

The Concussion Diaries

“I suffered a serious concussion in April 2017. Alice fell down a rabbit hole; I just fell on the floor. The doctors forbade ‘reading, screens of any sort, and complex thinking.’ For the first four months I couldn’t even listen to music. I wondered if I might go bonkers – and then I wondered if that was complex thinking. Without the capacity for the usual distractions, I found myself in a quiet world of color and composition. In some ways my sensory experience was stripped down, but in other ways it was heightened. On the daily walks required for my recovery, I noticed every detail of spring in New Jersey – leaves unfurling, vines encircling, the patterns in moss – with a piercing intensity.

At the suggestion of a friend I started painting. I had spent a lifetime deeply engaged by twentieth-century American artists and poets. My icons were the two Helens of New York, Frankenthaler and Levitt, and the poets Robert Hass and John Ashbery. At various points my artistic energy went into making photography, writing poetry and weaving, but I had always considered painting off limits. The concussion eliminated my silly, self-imposed restraints, and painting turned the disaster into discovery.

My limited faculties when I started painting freed me from spending any time thinking about why I was painting and what I was trying to say with my work. Two of my paintings, Charlottesville and Categoría Cinco (Maria) are direct responses to current events, but the others are explorations of technique, color and form. Asking myself now about the why and the what, I am reminded of a talk I went to by the photographers Laura McPhee and Virginia Beahan. In response to a student who asked about pursuing a career in art, one of them said, ‘If you don’t need to make photographs, you won’t.’ I am still finding my way as a painter, but I can say for certain that I need to make paintings.”

-Terri Riendeau

The Periodic Table of Elements


“My work has always been inspired, to one degree or another, by my interest and attention to the Sciences.


This new body of work, THE PERIODIC TABLE OF ELEMENTS, gets to the essence of life and ecosystems by focusing on the natural “elements” themselves which make everything in the natural and synthetic worlds possible.


Congruent with this are my own principle interests with surface and materiality as each work is an experiment with materials and texture – mixing a variety of gels and other additives to the paints in order to achieve the desired effect.  This is the driving force for me with relation to this project. Each element presents a new set of characteristics that need to be studied and assessed. This pushes me to experiment with textures and material effects that speak directly to the physical properties of each element, as well as, direct the color and compositional aspects of the work.  I consider experimentation and imagination to be the two key components in all creative endeavors and these are intrinsic to the creative process in general.


For me, every work should move forward in some way – never repeating motifs or notions about plasticity in order to attain consistency. Rather, painting is first and foremost about attention and discovery – attention for the sake of understanding and discovery for the sake of expression.”

-Robert DiMatteo

 

Saturday, March 23

Artist Talk: Riverside Silos/Shaping Spaces

- Free and Open to the Public!

Join the Arts Council for talk with the artists of Riverside Silos/Shaping Spaces.

Photographer Ricardo Barros and sculptor Autin Wright present a study of light, shadow and form. Barros’ Riverside Silos Series was photographed over a five year period, focusing on the industrial landscape outside of Barros’ studio. Autin Wright’s sculpture demonstrate superior skills in a variety of materials. Throughout his career, he has worked in wood, marble, bronze, iron, aluminum and fiberglass. This diversity of materials provides the artist with unique ways to express his creativity and allows him to showcase his technical mastery.

Opening Reception: Riverside Silos/Shaping Spaces

- Free and Open to the Public!

Join the Arts Council for the Opening Reception of Riverside Silos/Shaping Spaces.

Photographer Ricardo Barros and sculptor Autin Wright present a study of light, shadow and form. Barros’ Riverside Silos Series was photographed over a five year period, focusing on the industrial landscape outside of Barros’ studio. Autin Wright’s sculpture demonstrate superior skills in a variety of materials. Throughout his career, he has worked in wood, marble, bronze, iron, aluminum and fiberglass. This diversity of materials provides the artist with unique ways to express his creativity and allows him to showcase his technical mastery.

Cafe Improv: Community Stage Event

- $1 ACP Members; $2 General Admission

For the past 25 years, Café Improv has connected beginning and professional performers in the ACP’s Solley Theater. Attendees can expect an evening of exciting local music, poetry, comedy, and more. Café Improv is easily accessible to the public through affordable admission rates and televised broadcasts on Princeton Community Television. Click here to learn more and/or register to play!

This performance is part of the Arts Council of Princeton’s Community Stage Series. Community Stage productions are free (and nearly free) held in collaboration with local artistic groups and organizations. Community Stage programming enable the Arts Council’s Solley Theater to act as an accessible space for community partnerships and high-quality artistic experiences.

Ceramics by Jenyfer Guethe

Visit the Arts Council of Princeton’s Solley Lobby Gallery to view work by ceramic artist Jenyfer Guethe.

My work with clay combines functional pottery with free flowing sculptural forms. Since I was young I’ve been fascinated with how nature seems to have an overall “flow”, similar to how ocean waves are constantly changing the shoreline with each ebb and flow of the tide. This can leave a subtle soft touch on the sand when a gentle wave has pulled away, or a more pronounced sharper gouge to the shoreline if there are rougher seas. I translate that thinking into my work that nothing is set in stone – what starts out as a simply thrown bowl can be carved, altered, and ultimately completely transformed from the original shape. Every piece has the possibility to become something completely different than how it was initially created. I find carving my work therapeutic as well.. with every piece, each alteration through carving is slowly changing the shape to express its full potential. I aim to create pottery that will be admired while used, and hope to inspire people that anything that began as ordinary can be transformed into something extraordinary.
-Jenyfer Guethe


Riverside Silos/Shaping Spaces

The Arts Council of Princeton presents Riverside Silos/Shaping Spaces, a dual exhibition by photographer Ricardo Barros & sculptor Austin Wright. This installation addresses volume– the space a substance occupies – in various ways through light, shadow, and form.

 

“You could say we’re focusing on the same subject, but seeing it through different lenses,” says Princeton resident photographer Barros.

 

“Or,” sculptor Wright adds, “We’re both pursuing a sculptural vision. Mine results in a three-dimensional sculpture. Ricardo works with similar forms to produce a two-dimensional photograph.”

 

[caption id="attachment_22839" align="aligncenter" width="1024"] Ricardo Barros
Untitled
Photography[/caption]

 

The Concussion Diaries

“I suffered a serious concussion in April 2017. Alice fell down a rabbit hole; I just fell on the floor. The doctors forbade ‘reading, screens of any sort, and complex thinking.’ For the first four months I couldn’t even listen to music. I wondered if I might go bonkers – and then I wondered if that was complex thinking. Without the capacity for the usual distractions, I found myself in a quiet world of color and composition. In some ways my sensory experience was stripped down, but in other ways it was heightened. On the daily walks required for my recovery, I noticed every detail of spring in New Jersey – leaves unfurling, vines encircling, the patterns in moss – with a piercing intensity.

At the suggestion of a friend I started painting. I had spent a lifetime deeply engaged by twentieth-century American artists and poets. My icons were the two Helens of New York, Frankenthaler and Levitt, and the poets Robert Hass and John Ashbery. At various points my artistic energy went into making photography, writing poetry and weaving, but I had always considered painting off limits. The concussion eliminated my silly, self-imposed restraints, and painting turned the disaster into discovery.

My limited faculties when I started painting freed me from spending any time thinking about why I was painting and what I was trying to say with my work. Two of my paintings, Charlottesville and Categoría Cinco (Maria) are direct responses to current events, but the others are explorations of technique, color and form. Asking myself now about the why and the what, I am reminded of a talk I went to by the photographers Laura McPhee and Virginia Beahan. In response to a student who asked about pursuing a career in art, one of them said, ‘If you don’t need to make photographs, you won’t.’ I am still finding my way as a painter, but I can say for certain that I need to make paintings.”

-Terri Riendeau

The Periodic Table of Elements


“My work has always been inspired, to one degree or another, by my interest and attention to the Sciences.


This new body of work, THE PERIODIC TABLE OF ELEMENTS, gets to the essence of life and ecosystems by focusing on the natural “elements” themselves which make everything in the natural and synthetic worlds possible.


Congruent with this are my own principle interests with surface and materiality as each work is an experiment with materials and texture – mixing a variety of gels and other additives to the paints in order to achieve the desired effect.  This is the driving force for me with relation to this project. Each element presents a new set of characteristics that need to be studied and assessed. This pushes me to experiment with textures and material effects that speak directly to the physical properties of each element, as well as, direct the color and compositional aspects of the work.  I consider experimentation and imagination to be the two key components in all creative endeavors and these are intrinsic to the creative process in general.


For me, every work should move forward in some way – never repeating motifs or notions about plasticity in order to attain consistency. Rather, painting is first and foremost about attention and discovery – attention for the sake of understanding and discovery for the sake of expression.”

-Robert DiMatteo

 

WILD: Wildlife Paintings and Drawings

The Arts Council of Princeton of Princeton is pleased to present an exhibition of wildlife related artworks by Charles David Viera in support of the Wildlife Painting and Drawing class offered for adults.

Horses, wolves, birds, and other animals are featured in these paintings and drawings for the aesthetic value and emotional impact that they inspire in this artist and longtime ACP instructor. The public is invited to join us for the exhibition opening, enjoy the exhibition, and register for the accompanying studio class.

[caption id="attachment_23677" align="aligncenter" width="492"] Fox Hunt : Duck
20 x 20 inches
Acrylic[/caption]

Sunday, March 24

Ceramics by Jenyfer Guethe

Visit the Arts Council of Princeton’s Solley Lobby Gallery to view work by ceramic artist Jenyfer Guethe.

My work with clay combines functional pottery with free flowing sculptural forms. Since I was young I’ve been fascinated with how nature seems to have an overall “flow”, similar to how ocean waves are constantly changing the shoreline with each ebb and flow of the tide. This can leave a subtle soft touch on the sand when a gentle wave has pulled away, or a more pronounced sharper gouge to the shoreline if there are rougher seas. I translate that thinking into my work that nothing is set in stone – what starts out as a simply thrown bowl can be carved, altered, and ultimately completely transformed from the original shape. Every piece has the possibility to become something completely different than how it was initially created. I find carving my work therapeutic as well.. with every piece, each alteration through carving is slowly changing the shape to express its full potential. I aim to create pottery that will be admired while used, and hope to inspire people that anything that began as ordinary can be transformed into something extraordinary.
-Jenyfer Guethe


Riverside Silos/Shaping Spaces

The Arts Council of Princeton presents Riverside Silos/Shaping Spaces, a dual exhibition by photographer Ricardo Barros & sculptor Austin Wright. This installation addresses volume– the space a substance occupies – in various ways through light, shadow, and form.

 

“You could say we’re focusing on the same subject, but seeing it through different lenses,” says Princeton resident photographer Barros.

 

“Or,” sculptor Wright adds, “We’re both pursuing a sculptural vision. Mine results in a three-dimensional sculpture. Ricardo works with similar forms to produce a two-dimensional photograph.”

 

[caption id="attachment_22839" align="aligncenter" width="1024"] Ricardo Barros
Untitled
Photography[/caption]

 

The Concussion Diaries

“I suffered a serious concussion in April 2017. Alice fell down a rabbit hole; I just fell on the floor. The doctors forbade ‘reading, screens of any sort, and complex thinking.’ For the first four months I couldn’t even listen to music. I wondered if I might go bonkers – and then I wondered if that was complex thinking. Without the capacity for the usual distractions, I found myself in a quiet world of color and composition. In some ways my sensory experience was stripped down, but in other ways it was heightened. On the daily walks required for my recovery, I noticed every detail of spring in New Jersey – leaves unfurling, vines encircling, the patterns in moss – with a piercing intensity.

At the suggestion of a friend I started painting. I had spent a lifetime deeply engaged by twentieth-century American artists and poets. My icons were the two Helens of New York, Frankenthaler and Levitt, and the poets Robert Hass and John Ashbery. At various points my artistic energy went into making photography, writing poetry and weaving, but I had always considered painting off limits. The concussion eliminated my silly, self-imposed restraints, and painting turned the disaster into discovery.

My limited faculties when I started painting freed me from spending any time thinking about why I was painting and what I was trying to say with my work. Two of my paintings, Charlottesville and Categoría Cinco (Maria) are direct responses to current events, but the others are explorations of technique, color and form. Asking myself now about the why and the what, I am reminded of a talk I went to by the photographers Laura McPhee and Virginia Beahan. In response to a student who asked about pursuing a career in art, one of them said, ‘If you don’t need to make photographs, you won’t.’ I am still finding my way as a painter, but I can say for certain that I need to make paintings.”

-Terri Riendeau

The Periodic Table of Elements


“My work has always been inspired, to one degree or another, by my interest and attention to the Sciences.


This new body of work, THE PERIODIC TABLE OF ELEMENTS, gets to the essence of life and ecosystems by focusing on the natural “elements” themselves which make everything in the natural and synthetic worlds possible.


Congruent with this are my own principle interests with surface and materiality as each work is an experiment with materials and texture – mixing a variety of gels and other additives to the paints in order to achieve the desired effect.  This is the driving force for me with relation to this project. Each element presents a new set of characteristics that need to be studied and assessed. This pushes me to experiment with textures and material effects that speak directly to the physical properties of each element, as well as, direct the color and compositional aspects of the work.  I consider experimentation and imagination to be the two key components in all creative endeavors and these are intrinsic to the creative process in general.


For me, every work should move forward in some way – never repeating motifs or notions about plasticity in order to attain consistency. Rather, painting is first and foremost about attention and discovery – attention for the sake of understanding and discovery for the sake of expression.”

-Robert DiMatteo

 

WILD: Wildlife Paintings and Drawings

The Arts Council of Princeton of Princeton is pleased to present an exhibition of wildlife related artworks by Charles David Viera in support of the Wildlife Painting and Drawing class offered for adults.

Horses, wolves, birds, and other animals are featured in these paintings and drawings for the aesthetic value and emotional impact that they inspire in this artist and longtime ACP instructor. The public is invited to join us for the exhibition opening, enjoy the exhibition, and register for the accompanying studio class.

[caption id="attachment_23677" align="aligncenter" width="492"] Fox Hunt : Duck
20 x 20 inches
Acrylic[/caption]

Monday, March 25

Open Drawing Workshop

- $15/$13 ACP Members

Open Drawing Workshop is a monitored, non-instructional workshop in which artists can work at their own pace in the medium of their selection (no turpentine-based oil paints, please) from a live nude model in short and sustained poses. Chairs and a limited number of easels are available. Students must provide their own materials. Come as often as you like throughout the year!


REGISTRATION IS NOT REQUIRED —just drop in and pay at the door ($15/$13 ACP members). Canceled on all Holiday Mondays.

Ceramics by Jenyfer Guethe

Visit the Arts Council of Princeton’s Solley Lobby Gallery to view work by ceramic artist Jenyfer Guethe.

My work with clay combines functional pottery with free flowing sculptural forms. Since I was young I’ve been fascinated with how nature seems to have an overall “flow”, similar to how ocean waves are constantly changing the shoreline with each ebb and flow of the tide. This can leave a subtle soft touch on the sand when a gentle wave has pulled away, or a more pronounced sharper gouge to the shoreline if there are rougher seas. I translate that thinking into my work that nothing is set in stone – what starts out as a simply thrown bowl can be carved, altered, and ultimately completely transformed from the original shape. Every piece has the possibility to become something completely different than how it was initially created. I find carving my work therapeutic as well.. with every piece, each alteration through carving is slowly changing the shape to express its full potential. I aim to create pottery that will be admired while used, and hope to inspire people that anything that began as ordinary can be transformed into something extraordinary.
-Jenyfer Guethe


Riverside Silos/Shaping Spaces

The Arts Council of Princeton presents Riverside Silos/Shaping Spaces, a dual exhibition by photographer Ricardo Barros & sculptor Austin Wright. This installation addresses volume– the space a substance occupies – in various ways through light, shadow, and form.

 

“You could say we’re focusing on the same subject, but seeing it through different lenses,” says Princeton resident photographer Barros.

 

“Or,” sculptor Wright adds, “We’re both pursuing a sculptural vision. Mine results in a three-dimensional sculpture. Ricardo works with similar forms to produce a two-dimensional photograph.”

 

[caption id="attachment_22839" align="aligncenter" width="1024"] Ricardo Barros
Untitled
Photography[/caption]

 

The Concussion Diaries

“I suffered a serious concussion in April 2017. Alice fell down a rabbit hole; I just fell on the floor. The doctors forbade ‘reading, screens of any sort, and complex thinking.’ For the first four months I couldn’t even listen to music. I wondered if I might go bonkers – and then I wondered if that was complex thinking. Without the capacity for the usual distractions, I found myself in a quiet world of color and composition. In some ways my sensory experience was stripped down, but in other ways it was heightened. On the daily walks required for my recovery, I noticed every detail of spring in New Jersey – leaves unfurling, vines encircling, the patterns in moss – with a piercing intensity.

At the suggestion of a friend I started painting. I had spent a lifetime deeply engaged by twentieth-century American artists and poets. My icons were the two Helens of New York, Frankenthaler and Levitt, and the poets Robert Hass and John Ashbery. At various points my artistic energy went into making photography, writing poetry and weaving, but I had always considered painting off limits. The concussion eliminated my silly, self-imposed restraints, and painting turned the disaster into discovery.

My limited faculties when I started painting freed me from spending any time thinking about why I was painting and what I was trying to say with my work. Two of my paintings, Charlottesville and Categoría Cinco (Maria) are direct responses to current events, but the others are explorations of technique, color and form. Asking myself now about the why and the what, I am reminded of a talk I went to by the photographers Laura McPhee and Virginia Beahan. In response to a student who asked about pursuing a career in art, one of them said, ‘If you don’t need to make photographs, you won’t.’ I am still finding my way as a painter, but I can say for certain that I need to make paintings.”

-Terri Riendeau

The Periodic Table of Elements


“My work has always been inspired, to one degree or another, by my interest and attention to the Sciences.


This new body of work, THE PERIODIC TABLE OF ELEMENTS, gets to the essence of life and ecosystems by focusing on the natural “elements” themselves which make everything in the natural and synthetic worlds possible.


Congruent with this are my own principle interests with surface and materiality as each work is an experiment with materials and texture – mixing a variety of gels and other additives to the paints in order to achieve the desired effect.  This is the driving force for me with relation to this project. Each element presents a new set of characteristics that need to be studied and assessed. This pushes me to experiment with textures and material effects that speak directly to the physical properties of each element, as well as, direct the color and compositional aspects of the work.  I consider experimentation and imagination to be the two key components in all creative endeavors and these are intrinsic to the creative process in general.


For me, every work should move forward in some way – never repeating motifs or notions about plasticity in order to attain consistency. Rather, painting is first and foremost about attention and discovery – attention for the sake of understanding and discovery for the sake of expression.”

-Robert DiMatteo

 

WILD: Wildlife Paintings and Drawings

The Arts Council of Princeton of Princeton is pleased to present an exhibition of wildlife related artworks by Charles David Viera in support of the Wildlife Painting and Drawing class offered for adults.

Horses, wolves, birds, and other animals are featured in these paintings and drawings for the aesthetic value and emotional impact that they inspire in this artist and longtime ACP instructor. The public is invited to join us for the exhibition opening, enjoy the exhibition, and register for the accompanying studio class.

[caption id="attachment_23677" align="aligncenter" width="492"] Fox Hunt : Duck
20 x 20 inches
Acrylic[/caption]

Tuesday, March 26

Ceramics by Jenyfer Guethe

Visit the Arts Council of Princeton’s Solley Lobby Gallery to view work by ceramic artist Jenyfer Guethe.

My work with clay combines functional pottery with free flowing sculptural forms. Since I was young I’ve been fascinated with how nature seems to have an overall “flow”, similar to how ocean waves are constantly changing the shoreline with each ebb and flow of the tide. This can leave a subtle soft touch on the sand when a gentle wave has pulled away, or a more pronounced sharper gouge to the shoreline if there are rougher seas. I translate that thinking into my work that nothing is set in stone – what starts out as a simply thrown bowl can be carved, altered, and ultimately completely transformed from the original shape. Every piece has the possibility to become something completely different than how it was initially created. I find carving my work therapeutic as well.. with every piece, each alteration through carving is slowly changing the shape to express its full potential. I aim to create pottery that will be admired while used, and hope to inspire people that anything that began as ordinary can be transformed into something extraordinary.
-Jenyfer Guethe


Riverside Silos/Shaping Spaces

The Arts Council of Princeton presents Riverside Silos/Shaping Spaces, a dual exhibition by photographer Ricardo Barros & sculptor Austin Wright. This installation addresses volume– the space a substance occupies – in various ways through light, shadow, and form.

 

“You could say we’re focusing on the same subject, but seeing it through different lenses,” says Princeton resident photographer Barros.

 

“Or,” sculptor Wright adds, “We’re both pursuing a sculptural vision. Mine results in a three-dimensional sculpture. Ricardo works with similar forms to produce a two-dimensional photograph.”

 

[caption id="attachment_22839" align="aligncenter" width="1024"] Ricardo Barros
Untitled
Photography[/caption]

 

The Concussion Diaries

“I suffered a serious concussion in April 2017. Alice fell down a rabbit hole; I just fell on the floor. The doctors forbade ‘reading, screens of any sort, and complex thinking.’ For the first four months I couldn’t even listen to music. I wondered if I might go bonkers – and then I wondered if that was complex thinking. Without the capacity for the usual distractions, I found myself in a quiet world of color and composition. In some ways my sensory experience was stripped down, but in other ways it was heightened. On the daily walks required for my recovery, I noticed every detail of spring in New Jersey – leaves unfurling, vines encircling, the patterns in moss – with a piercing intensity.

At the suggestion of a friend I started painting. I had spent a lifetime deeply engaged by twentieth-century American artists and poets. My icons were the two Helens of New York, Frankenthaler and Levitt, and the poets Robert Hass and John Ashbery. At various points my artistic energy went into making photography, writing poetry and weaving, but I had always considered painting off limits. The concussion eliminated my silly, self-imposed restraints, and painting turned the disaster into discovery.

My limited faculties when I started painting freed me from spending any time thinking about why I was painting and what I was trying to say with my work. Two of my paintings, Charlottesville and Categoría Cinco (Maria) are direct responses to current events, but the others are explorations of technique, color and form. Asking myself now about the why and the what, I am reminded of a talk I went to by the photographers Laura McPhee and Virginia Beahan. In response to a student who asked about pursuing a career in art, one of them said, ‘If you don’t need to make photographs, you won’t.’ I am still finding my way as a painter, but I can say for certain that I need to make paintings.”

-Terri Riendeau

The Periodic Table of Elements


“My work has always been inspired, to one degree or another, by my interest and attention to the Sciences.


This new body of work, THE PERIODIC TABLE OF ELEMENTS, gets to the essence of life and ecosystems by focusing on the natural “elements” themselves which make everything in the natural and synthetic worlds possible.


Congruent with this are my own principle interests with surface and materiality as each work is an experiment with materials and texture – mixing a variety of gels and other additives to the paints in order to achieve the desired effect.  This is the driving force for me with relation to this project. Each element presents a new set of characteristics that need to be studied and assessed. This pushes me to experiment with textures and material effects that speak directly to the physical properties of each element, as well as, direct the color and compositional aspects of the work.  I consider experimentation and imagination to be the two key components in all creative endeavors and these are intrinsic to the creative process in general.


For me, every work should move forward in some way – never repeating motifs or notions about plasticity in order to attain consistency. Rather, painting is first and foremost about attention and discovery – attention for the sake of understanding and discovery for the sake of expression.”

-Robert DiMatteo

 

WILD: Wildlife Paintings and Drawings

The Arts Council of Princeton of Princeton is pleased to present an exhibition of wildlife related artworks by Charles David Viera in support of the Wildlife Painting and Drawing class offered for adults.

Horses, wolves, birds, and other animals are featured in these paintings and drawings for the aesthetic value and emotional impact that they inspire in this artist and longtime ACP instructor. The public is invited to join us for the exhibition opening, enjoy the exhibition, and register for the accompanying studio class.

[caption id="attachment_23677" align="aligncenter" width="492"] Fox Hunt : Duck
20 x 20 inches
Acrylic[/caption]

Wednesday, March 27

Ceramics by Jenyfer Guethe

Visit the Arts Council of Princeton’s Solley Lobby Gallery to view work by ceramic artist Jenyfer Guethe.

My work with clay combines functional pottery with free flowing sculptural forms. Since I was young I’ve been fascinated with how nature seems to have an overall “flow”, similar to how ocean waves are constantly changing the shoreline with each ebb and flow of the tide. This can leave a subtle soft touch on the sand when a gentle wave has pulled away, or a more pronounced sharper gouge to the shoreline if there are rougher seas. I translate that thinking into my work that nothing is set in stone – what starts out as a simply thrown bowl can be carved, altered, and ultimately completely transformed from the original shape. Every piece has the possibility to become something completely different than how it was initially created. I find carving my work therapeutic as well.. with every piece, each alteration through carving is slowly changing the shape to express its full potential. I aim to create pottery that will be admired while used, and hope to inspire people that anything that began as ordinary can be transformed into something extraordinary.
-Jenyfer Guethe


Riverside Silos/Shaping Spaces

The Arts Council of Princeton presents Riverside Silos/Shaping Spaces, a dual exhibition by photographer Ricardo Barros & sculptor Austin Wright. This installation addresses volume– the space a substance occupies – in various ways through light, shadow, and form.

 

“You could say we’re focusing on the same subject, but seeing it through different lenses,” says Princeton resident photographer Barros.

 

“Or,” sculptor Wright adds, “We’re both pursuing a sculptural vision. Mine results in a three-dimensional sculpture. Ricardo works with similar forms to produce a two-dimensional photograph.”

 

[caption id="attachment_22839" align="aligncenter" width="1024"] Ricardo Barros
Untitled
Photography[/caption]

 

The Concussion Diaries

“I suffered a serious concussion in April 2017. Alice fell down a rabbit hole; I just fell on the floor. The doctors forbade ‘reading, screens of any sort, and complex thinking.’ For the first four months I couldn’t even listen to music. I wondered if I might go bonkers – and then I wondered if that was complex thinking. Without the capacity for the usual distractions, I found myself in a quiet world of color and composition. In some ways my sensory experience was stripped down, but in other ways it was heightened. On the daily walks required for my recovery, I noticed every detail of spring in New Jersey – leaves unfurling, vines encircling, the patterns in moss – with a piercing intensity.

At the suggestion of a friend I started painting. I had spent a lifetime deeply engaged by twentieth-century American artists and poets. My icons were the two Helens of New York, Frankenthaler and Levitt, and the poets Robert Hass and John Ashbery. At various points my artistic energy went into making photography, writing poetry and weaving, but I had always considered painting off limits. The concussion eliminated my silly, self-imposed restraints, and painting turned the disaster into discovery.

My limited faculties when I started painting freed me from spending any time thinking about why I was painting and what I was trying to say with my work. Two of my paintings, Charlottesville and Categoría Cinco (Maria) are direct responses to current events, but the others are explorations of technique, color and form. Asking myself now about the why and the what, I am reminded of a talk I went to by the photographers Laura McPhee and Virginia Beahan. In response to a student who asked about pursuing a career in art, one of them said, ‘If you don’t need to make photographs, you won’t.’ I am still finding my way as a painter, but I can say for certain that I need to make paintings.”

-Terri Riendeau

The Periodic Table of Elements


“My work has always been inspired, to one degree or another, by my interest and attention to the Sciences.


This new body of work, THE PERIODIC TABLE OF ELEMENTS, gets to the essence of life and ecosystems by focusing on the natural “elements” themselves which make everything in the natural and synthetic worlds possible.


Congruent with this are my own principle interests with surface and materiality as each work is an experiment with materials and texture – mixing a variety of gels and other additives to the paints in order to achieve the desired effect.  This is the driving force for me with relation to this project. Each element presents a new set of characteristics that need to be studied and assessed. This pushes me to experiment with textures and material effects that speak directly to the physical properties of each element, as well as, direct the color and compositional aspects of the work.  I consider experimentation and imagination to be the two key components in all creative endeavors and these are intrinsic to the creative process in general.


For me, every work should move forward in some way – never repeating motifs or notions about plasticity in order to attain consistency. Rather, painting is first and foremost about attention and discovery – attention for the sake of understanding and discovery for the sake of expression.”

-Robert DiMatteo

 

WILD: Wildlife Paintings and Drawings

The Arts Council of Princeton of Princeton is pleased to present an exhibition of wildlife related artworks by Charles David Viera in support of the Wildlife Painting and Drawing class offered for adults.

Horses, wolves, birds, and other animals are featured in these paintings and drawings for the aesthetic value and emotional impact that they inspire in this artist and longtime ACP instructor. The public is invited to join us for the exhibition opening, enjoy the exhibition, and register for the accompanying studio class.

[caption id="attachment_23677" align="aligncenter" width="492"] Fox Hunt : Duck
20 x 20 inches
Acrylic[/caption]

Thursday, March 28

Ceramics by Jenyfer Guethe

Visit the Arts Council of Princeton’s Solley Lobby Gallery to view work by ceramic artist Jenyfer Guethe.

My work with clay combines functional pottery with free flowing sculptural forms. Since I was young I’ve been fascinated with how nature seems to have an overall “flow”, similar to how ocean waves are constantly changing the shoreline with each ebb and flow of the tide. This can leave a subtle soft touch on the sand when a gentle wave has pulled away, or a more pronounced sharper gouge to the shoreline if there are rougher seas. I translate that thinking into my work that nothing is set in stone – what starts out as a simply thrown bowl can be carved, altered, and ultimately completely transformed from the original shape. Every piece has the possibility to become something completely different than how it was initially created. I find carving my work therapeutic as well.. with every piece, each alteration through carving is slowly changing the shape to express its full potential. I aim to create pottery that will be admired while used, and hope to inspire people that anything that began as ordinary can be transformed into something extraordinary.
-Jenyfer Guethe


Riverside Silos/Shaping Spaces

The Arts Council of Princeton presents Riverside Silos/Shaping Spaces, a dual exhibition by photographer Ricardo Barros & sculptor Austin Wright. This installation addresses volume– the space a substance occupies – in various ways through light, shadow, and form.

 

“You could say we’re focusing on the same subject, but seeing it through different lenses,” says Princeton resident photographer Barros.

 

“Or,” sculptor Wright adds, “We’re both pursuing a sculptural vision. Mine results in a three-dimensional sculpture. Ricardo works with similar forms to produce a two-dimensional photograph.”

 

[caption id="attachment_22839" align="aligncenter" width="1024"] Ricardo Barros
Untitled
Photography[/caption]

 

The Concussion Diaries

“I suffered a serious concussion in April 2017. Alice fell down a rabbit hole; I just fell on the floor. The doctors forbade ‘reading, screens of any sort, and complex thinking.’ For the first four months I couldn’t even listen to music. I wondered if I might go bonkers – and then I wondered if that was complex thinking. Without the capacity for the usual distractions, I found myself in a quiet world of color and composition. In some ways my sensory experience was stripped down, but in other ways it was heightened. On the daily walks required for my recovery, I noticed every detail of spring in New Jersey – leaves unfurling, vines encircling, the patterns in moss – with a piercing intensity.

At the suggestion of a friend I started painting. I had spent a lifetime deeply engaged by twentieth-century American artists and poets. My icons were the two Helens of New York, Frankenthaler and Levitt, and the poets Robert Hass and John Ashbery. At various points my artistic energy went into making photography, writing poetry and weaving, but I had always considered painting off limits. The concussion eliminated my silly, self-imposed restraints, and painting turned the disaster into discovery.

My limited faculties when I started painting freed me from spending any time thinking about why I was painting and what I was trying to say with my work. Two of my paintings, Charlottesville and Categoría Cinco (Maria) are direct responses to current events, but the others are explorations of technique, color and form. Asking myself now about the why and the what, I am reminded of a talk I went to by the photographers Laura McPhee and Virginia Beahan. In response to a student who asked about pursuing a career in art, one of them said, ‘If you don’t need to make photographs, you won’t.’ I am still finding my way as a painter, but I can say for certain that I need to make paintings.”

-Terri Riendeau

The Periodic Table of Elements


“My work has always been inspired, to one degree or another, by my interest and attention to the Sciences.


This new body of work, THE PERIODIC TABLE OF ELEMENTS, gets to the essence of life and ecosystems by focusing on the natural “elements” themselves which make everything in the natural and synthetic worlds possible.


Congruent with this are my own principle interests with surface and materiality as each work is an experiment with materials and texture – mixing a variety of gels and other additives to the paints in order to achieve the desired effect.  This is the driving force for me with relation to this project. Each element presents a new set of characteristics that need to be studied and assessed. This pushes me to experiment with textures and material effects that speak directly to the physical properties of each element, as well as, direct the color and compositional aspects of the work.  I consider experimentation and imagination to be the two key components in all creative endeavors and these are intrinsic to the creative process in general.


For me, every work should move forward in some way – never repeating motifs or notions about plasticity in order to attain consistency. Rather, painting is first and foremost about attention and discovery – attention for the sake of understanding and discovery for the sake of expression.”

-Robert DiMatteo

 

WILD: Wildlife Paintings and Drawings

The Arts Council of Princeton of Princeton is pleased to present an exhibition of wildlife related artworks by Charles David Viera in support of the Wildlife Painting and Drawing class offered for adults.

Horses, wolves, birds, and other animals are featured in these paintings and drawings for the aesthetic value and emotional impact that they inspire in this artist and longtime ACP instructor. The public is invited to join us for the exhibition opening, enjoy the exhibition, and register for the accompanying studio class.

[caption id="attachment_23677" align="aligncenter" width="492"] Fox Hunt : Duck
20 x 20 inches
Acrylic[/caption]