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Thursday, May 9

Pinot to Picasso Tombola Preview Opening Reception

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Join us for the Opening Reception of the Pinot to Picasso Tombola Preview. This showcase features the Tombola artwork for the Arts Council’s signature art and wine spring fundraiser, Pinot to Picasso, donated by local and regional professional artists.

 

PINOT TO PICASSO ARTISTS:
Jane Adriance
Sherri Andrews
Meghan Blair
Trudy Borenstein-Sugiura
Judith K. Brodsky
Zenna Broomer
Raymond Brown
Sean Carney
Ben Colbert
David Crow
7ovechild
Mira DeMartino
Barbara DiLorenzo
Robert DiMatteo
Jim Doherty
Anne Elliot
Hannah Fink
Joanna Furst
Maurice Galimidi
Trudy Glucksberg
Lisa Granozio
Nelson Hancock
Sue Hanks
Susan Hockaday
Susan Hoenig
Susan Intner
Shellie Jacobson
Robert Jenkins
Carole Jury
Shirley Kern
Kokko
Leslie Kuenne
Deborah Land
Marsha Levin-Rojer
Ryan Lilienthal
Robert Lowe
Susan MacQueen
Eva Mantell
Stephanie Magdziak
Helene Mazur
Meg Michael
Mark Moscarello
Caryn Newman
John O’Neill
Martha Otis
Michael Pascucci
Donna Payton
Debbie Pisacreta
Asia Popinska
Tatiana Popova
Kathleen Preziosi
Libby Ramage
Robin Resch
Terri Riendeau
Laurie Schwartzer
Aleskandra Seletskaya
Samia Hafiz Shaaban
Ifat Shatzky
Madelaine Shellaby
Nancy Shill
M. Teresa Simao
Alice Sims-Gunzenhauser
Stephanie Sprague
Patrick Strzelec
Aaron Usiskin
Andre Veloux
Charles David Viera
Diana Weymar
Wendel White
Andrew Wilkinson

Pinot Tombola Preview

The Pinot to Picasso Tombola Preview showcases the Tombola artwork for the Arts Council’s signature art and wine spring fundraiser, Pinot to Picasso. The Tombola preview includes works of original artwork donated by local and regional professional artists.

 

 

[caption id="attachment_24275" align="aligncenter" width="300"] Daddy’s Coming #2
Charles David Viera[/caption] [caption id="attachment_24274" align="aligncenter" width="300"] Mesh
Patrick Strzelec[/caption]

 

[caption id="attachment_24276" align="aligncenter" width="297"] Can We Talk About Outbreak?
Ifat Shatsky[/caption] [caption id="attachment_24277" align="aligncenter" width="300"] Forgive Yourself
Mira DeMartino[/caption] [caption id="attachment_24270" align="aligncenter" width="241"] Back Street in Hope Town, Bahamas
Meg Brinster Michael[/caption]

 

[caption id="attachment_24271" align="aligncenter" width="288"] Tribal Etching
Caryn Newman[/caption]

 

[caption id="attachment_24273" align="aligncenter" width="300"] Quidnet, Nantucket
Robin Resch[/caption]

 

The Concussion Diaries

“I suffered a serious concussion in April 2017. Alice fell down a rabbit hole; I just fell on the floor. The doctors forbade ‘reading, screens of any sort, and complex thinking.’ For the first four months I couldn’t even listen to music. I wondered if I might go bonkers – and then I wondered if that was complex thinking. Without the capacity for the usual distractions, I found myself in a quiet world of color and composition. In some ways my sensory experience was stripped down, but in other ways it was heightened. On the daily walks required for my recovery, I noticed every detail of spring in New Jersey – leaves unfurling, vines encircling, the patterns in moss – with a piercing intensity.

At the suggestion of a friend I started painting. I had spent a lifetime deeply engaged by twentieth-century American artists and poets. My icons were the two Helens of New York, Frankenthaler and Levitt, and the poets Robert Hass and John Ashbery. At various points my artistic energy went into making photography, writing poetry and weaving, but I had always considered painting off limits. The concussion eliminated my silly, self-imposed restraints, and painting turned the disaster into discovery.

My limited faculties when I started painting freed me from spending any time thinking about why I was painting and what I was trying to say with my work. Two of my paintings, Charlottesville and Categoría Cinco (Maria) are direct responses to current events, but the others are explorations of technique, color and form. Asking myself now about the why and the what, I am reminded of a talk I went to by the photographers Laura McPhee and Virginia Beahan. In response to a student who asked about pursuing a career in art, one of them said, ‘If you don’t need to make photographs, you won’t.’ I am still finding my way as a painter, but I can say for certain that I need to make paintings.”

-Terri Riendeau

The Periodic Table of Elements


“My work has always been inspired, to one degree or another, by my interest and attention to the Sciences.


This new body of work, THE PERIODIC TABLE OF ELEMENTS, gets to the essence of life and ecosystems by focusing on the natural “elements” themselves which make everything in the natural and synthetic worlds possible.


Congruent with this are my own principle interests with surface and materiality as each work is an experiment with materials and texture – mixing a variety of gels and other additives to the paints in order to achieve the desired effect.  This is the driving force for me with relation to this project. Each element presents a new set of characteristics that need to be studied and assessed. This pushes me to experiment with textures and material effects that speak directly to the physical properties of each element, as well as, direct the color and compositional aspects of the work.  I consider experimentation and imagination to be the two key components in all creative endeavors and these are intrinsic to the creative process in general.


For me, every work should move forward in some way – never repeating motifs or notions about plasticity in order to attain consistency. Rather, painting is first and foremost about attention and discovery – attention for the sake of understanding and discovery for the sake of expression.”

-Robert DiMatteo

 

WILD: Wildlife Paintings and Drawings

The Arts Council of Princeton of Princeton is pleased to present an exhibition of wildlife related artworks by Charles David Viera in support of the Wildlife Painting and Drawing class offered for adults.

Horses, wolves, birds, and other animals are featured in these paintings and drawings for the aesthetic value and emotional impact that they inspire in this artist and longtime ACP instructor. The public is invited to join us for the exhibition opening, enjoy the exhibition, and register for the accompanying studio class.

[caption id="attachment_23677" align="aligncenter" width="492"] Fox Hunt : Duck
20 x 20 inches
Acrylic[/caption]

Friday, May 10

Pinot Tombola Preview

The Pinot to Picasso Tombola Preview showcases the Tombola artwork for the Arts Council’s signature art and wine spring fundraiser, Pinot to Picasso. The Tombola preview includes works of original artwork donated by local and regional professional artists.

 

 

[caption id="attachment_24275" align="aligncenter" width="300"] Daddy’s Coming #2
Charles David Viera[/caption] [caption id="attachment_24274" align="aligncenter" width="300"] Mesh
Patrick Strzelec[/caption]

 

[caption id="attachment_24276" align="aligncenter" width="297"] Can We Talk About Outbreak?
Ifat Shatsky[/caption] [caption id="attachment_24277" align="aligncenter" width="300"] Forgive Yourself
Mira DeMartino[/caption] [caption id="attachment_24270" align="aligncenter" width="241"] Back Street in Hope Town, Bahamas
Meg Brinster Michael[/caption]

 

[caption id="attachment_24271" align="aligncenter" width="288"] Tribal Etching
Caryn Newman[/caption]

 

[caption id="attachment_24273" align="aligncenter" width="300"] Quidnet, Nantucket
Robin Resch[/caption]

 

The Concussion Diaries

“I suffered a serious concussion in April 2017. Alice fell down a rabbit hole; I just fell on the floor. The doctors forbade ‘reading, screens of any sort, and complex thinking.’ For the first four months I couldn’t even listen to music. I wondered if I might go bonkers – and then I wondered if that was complex thinking. Without the capacity for the usual distractions, I found myself in a quiet world of color and composition. In some ways my sensory experience was stripped down, but in other ways it was heightened. On the daily walks required for my recovery, I noticed every detail of spring in New Jersey – leaves unfurling, vines encircling, the patterns in moss – with a piercing intensity.

At the suggestion of a friend I started painting. I had spent a lifetime deeply engaged by twentieth-century American artists and poets. My icons were the two Helens of New York, Frankenthaler and Levitt, and the poets Robert Hass and John Ashbery. At various points my artistic energy went into making photography, writing poetry and weaving, but I had always considered painting off limits. The concussion eliminated my silly, self-imposed restraints, and painting turned the disaster into discovery.

My limited faculties when I started painting freed me from spending any time thinking about why I was painting and what I was trying to say with my work. Two of my paintings, Charlottesville and Categoría Cinco (Maria) are direct responses to current events, but the others are explorations of technique, color and form. Asking myself now about the why and the what, I am reminded of a talk I went to by the photographers Laura McPhee and Virginia Beahan. In response to a student who asked about pursuing a career in art, one of them said, ‘If you don’t need to make photographs, you won’t.’ I am still finding my way as a painter, but I can say for certain that I need to make paintings.”

-Terri Riendeau

The Periodic Table of Elements


“My work has always been inspired, to one degree or another, by my interest and attention to the Sciences.


This new body of work, THE PERIODIC TABLE OF ELEMENTS, gets to the essence of life and ecosystems by focusing on the natural “elements” themselves which make everything in the natural and synthetic worlds possible.


Congruent with this are my own principle interests with surface and materiality as each work is an experiment with materials and texture – mixing a variety of gels and other additives to the paints in order to achieve the desired effect.  This is the driving force for me with relation to this project. Each element presents a new set of characteristics that need to be studied and assessed. This pushes me to experiment with textures and material effects that speak directly to the physical properties of each element, as well as, direct the color and compositional aspects of the work.  I consider experimentation and imagination to be the two key components in all creative endeavors and these are intrinsic to the creative process in general.


For me, every work should move forward in some way – never repeating motifs or notions about plasticity in order to attain consistency. Rather, painting is first and foremost about attention and discovery – attention for the sake of understanding and discovery for the sake of expression.”

-Robert DiMatteo

 

WILD: Wildlife Paintings and Drawings

The Arts Council of Princeton of Princeton is pleased to present an exhibition of wildlife related artworks by Charles David Viera in support of the Wildlife Painting and Drawing class offered for adults.

Horses, wolves, birds, and other animals are featured in these paintings and drawings for the aesthetic value and emotional impact that they inspire in this artist and longtime ACP instructor. The public is invited to join us for the exhibition opening, enjoy the exhibition, and register for the accompanying studio class.

[caption id="attachment_23677" align="aligncenter" width="492"] Fox Hunt : Duck
20 x 20 inches
Acrylic[/caption]

Saturday, May 11

Katie Welsh: Love…According to the Great American Songbook

- $15

Katie explores the joys and complications of love in a collection of songs from the Great American Songbook. Katie sings favorite love songs by George and Ira Gershwin, Richard Rodgers and Lorenz Hart, Jerome Kern and Oscar Hammerstein II, Irving Berlin, Cole Porter, Cy Coleman and more!

Tickets are $15 and available online on Eventbrite by clicking here. Tickets will also be sold at the door.

Purchase tickets to other programs in this series…

 

The Broadway Musical Heroine
Saturday, April 6th @ 7:30 PM

The Music of Richard Rodgers
Saturday, June 15th @ 7:30 PM

Katie Welsh is a singer specializing in musical theater and the Great American Songbook and a Phi Beta Kappa graduate of Princeton University. Katie’s recent performances have included solo engagements at Feinstein’s/54 Below, Don’t Tell Mama, The Duplex Cabaret Theatre, the Metropolitan Room, BroadwayCon, and the Princeton Club of New York. Visit KatieWelsh.com and follow Katie @katiewelshmusic.

Pianist David Pearl has performed in many of New York’s premiere venues (Joe’s Pub, Rainbow Room, Café Sabarsky, The Cutting Room, Symphony Space) and collaborates frequently with musicians in the jazz and classical community.

This event is presented by the Music & Theater Collective, an organization dedicated to celebrating music and theater through performance and scholarship. For more information, contact us at musictheatrecollective@gmail.com or 609.915.7889.

Pinot Tombola Preview

The Pinot to Picasso Tombola Preview showcases the Tombola artwork for the Arts Council’s signature art and wine spring fundraiser, Pinot to Picasso. The Tombola preview includes works of original artwork donated by local and regional professional artists.

 

 

[caption id="attachment_24275" align="aligncenter" width="300"] Daddy’s Coming #2
Charles David Viera[/caption] [caption id="attachment_24274" align="aligncenter" width="300"] Mesh
Patrick Strzelec[/caption]

 

[caption id="attachment_24276" align="aligncenter" width="297"] Can We Talk About Outbreak?
Ifat Shatsky[/caption] [caption id="attachment_24277" align="aligncenter" width="300"] Forgive Yourself
Mira DeMartino[/caption] [caption id="attachment_24270" align="aligncenter" width="241"] Back Street in Hope Town, Bahamas
Meg Brinster Michael[/caption]

 

[caption id="attachment_24271" align="aligncenter" width="288"] Tribal Etching
Caryn Newman[/caption]

 

[caption id="attachment_24273" align="aligncenter" width="300"] Quidnet, Nantucket
Robin Resch[/caption]

 

The Concussion Diaries

“I suffered a serious concussion in April 2017. Alice fell down a rabbit hole; I just fell on the floor. The doctors forbade ‘reading, screens of any sort, and complex thinking.’ For the first four months I couldn’t even listen to music. I wondered if I might go bonkers – and then I wondered if that was complex thinking. Without the capacity for the usual distractions, I found myself in a quiet world of color and composition. In some ways my sensory experience was stripped down, but in other ways it was heightened. On the daily walks required for my recovery, I noticed every detail of spring in New Jersey – leaves unfurling, vines encircling, the patterns in moss – with a piercing intensity.

At the suggestion of a friend I started painting. I had spent a lifetime deeply engaged by twentieth-century American artists and poets. My icons were the two Helens of New York, Frankenthaler and Levitt, and the poets Robert Hass and John Ashbery. At various points my artistic energy went into making photography, writing poetry and weaving, but I had always considered painting off limits. The concussion eliminated my silly, self-imposed restraints, and painting turned the disaster into discovery.

My limited faculties when I started painting freed me from spending any time thinking about why I was painting and what I was trying to say with my work. Two of my paintings, Charlottesville and Categoría Cinco (Maria) are direct responses to current events, but the others are explorations of technique, color and form. Asking myself now about the why and the what, I am reminded of a talk I went to by the photographers Laura McPhee and Virginia Beahan. In response to a student who asked about pursuing a career in art, one of them said, ‘If you don’t need to make photographs, you won’t.’ I am still finding my way as a painter, but I can say for certain that I need to make paintings.”

-Terri Riendeau

The Periodic Table of Elements


“My work has always been inspired, to one degree or another, by my interest and attention to the Sciences.


This new body of work, THE PERIODIC TABLE OF ELEMENTS, gets to the essence of life and ecosystems by focusing on the natural “elements” themselves which make everything in the natural and synthetic worlds possible.


Congruent with this are my own principle interests with surface and materiality as each work is an experiment with materials and texture – mixing a variety of gels and other additives to the paints in order to achieve the desired effect.  This is the driving force for me with relation to this project. Each element presents a new set of characteristics that need to be studied and assessed. This pushes me to experiment with textures and material effects that speak directly to the physical properties of each element, as well as, direct the color and compositional aspects of the work.  I consider experimentation and imagination to be the two key components in all creative endeavors and these are intrinsic to the creative process in general.


For me, every work should move forward in some way – never repeating motifs or notions about plasticity in order to attain consistency. Rather, painting is first and foremost about attention and discovery – attention for the sake of understanding and discovery for the sake of expression.”

-Robert DiMatteo

 

WILD: Wildlife Paintings and Drawings

The Arts Council of Princeton of Princeton is pleased to present an exhibition of wildlife related artworks by Charles David Viera in support of the Wildlife Painting and Drawing class offered for adults.

Horses, wolves, birds, and other animals are featured in these paintings and drawings for the aesthetic value and emotional impact that they inspire in this artist and longtime ACP instructor. The public is invited to join us for the exhibition opening, enjoy the exhibition, and register for the accompanying studio class.

[caption id="attachment_23677" align="aligncenter" width="492"] Fox Hunt : Duck
20 x 20 inches
Acrylic[/caption]

Sunday, May 12

Pinot Tombola Preview

The Pinot to Picasso Tombola Preview showcases the Tombola artwork for the Arts Council’s signature art and wine spring fundraiser, Pinot to Picasso. The Tombola preview includes works of original artwork donated by local and regional professional artists.

 

 

[caption id="attachment_24275" align="aligncenter" width="300"] Daddy’s Coming #2
Charles David Viera[/caption] [caption id="attachment_24274" align="aligncenter" width="300"] Mesh
Patrick Strzelec[/caption]

 

[caption id="attachment_24276" align="aligncenter" width="297"] Can We Talk About Outbreak?
Ifat Shatsky[/caption] [caption id="attachment_24277" align="aligncenter" width="300"] Forgive Yourself
Mira DeMartino[/caption] [caption id="attachment_24270" align="aligncenter" width="241"] Back Street in Hope Town, Bahamas
Meg Brinster Michael[/caption]

 

[caption id="attachment_24271" align="aligncenter" width="288"] Tribal Etching
Caryn Newman[/caption]

 

[caption id="attachment_24273" align="aligncenter" width="300"] Quidnet, Nantucket
Robin Resch[/caption]

 

The Concussion Diaries

“I suffered a serious concussion in April 2017. Alice fell down a rabbit hole; I just fell on the floor. The doctors forbade ‘reading, screens of any sort, and complex thinking.’ For the first four months I couldn’t even listen to music. I wondered if I might go bonkers – and then I wondered if that was complex thinking. Without the capacity for the usual distractions, I found myself in a quiet world of color and composition. In some ways my sensory experience was stripped down, but in other ways it was heightened. On the daily walks required for my recovery, I noticed every detail of spring in New Jersey – leaves unfurling, vines encircling, the patterns in moss – with a piercing intensity.

At the suggestion of a friend I started painting. I had spent a lifetime deeply engaged by twentieth-century American artists and poets. My icons were the two Helens of New York, Frankenthaler and Levitt, and the poets Robert Hass and John Ashbery. At various points my artistic energy went into making photography, writing poetry and weaving, but I had always considered painting off limits. The concussion eliminated my silly, self-imposed restraints, and painting turned the disaster into discovery.

My limited faculties when I started painting freed me from spending any time thinking about why I was painting and what I was trying to say with my work. Two of my paintings, Charlottesville and Categoría Cinco (Maria) are direct responses to current events, but the others are explorations of technique, color and form. Asking myself now about the why and the what, I am reminded of a talk I went to by the photographers Laura McPhee and Virginia Beahan. In response to a student who asked about pursuing a career in art, one of them said, ‘If you don’t need to make photographs, you won’t.’ I am still finding my way as a painter, but I can say for certain that I need to make paintings.”

-Terri Riendeau

The Periodic Table of Elements


“My work has always been inspired, to one degree or another, by my interest and attention to the Sciences.


This new body of work, THE PERIODIC TABLE OF ELEMENTS, gets to the essence of life and ecosystems by focusing on the natural “elements” themselves which make everything in the natural and synthetic worlds possible.


Congruent with this are my own principle interests with surface and materiality as each work is an experiment with materials and texture – mixing a variety of gels and other additives to the paints in order to achieve the desired effect.  This is the driving force for me with relation to this project. Each element presents a new set of characteristics that need to be studied and assessed. This pushes me to experiment with textures and material effects that speak directly to the physical properties of each element, as well as, direct the color and compositional aspects of the work.  I consider experimentation and imagination to be the two key components in all creative endeavors and these are intrinsic to the creative process in general.


For me, every work should move forward in some way – never repeating motifs or notions about plasticity in order to attain consistency. Rather, painting is first and foremost about attention and discovery – attention for the sake of understanding and discovery for the sake of expression.”

-Robert DiMatteo

 

WILD: Wildlife Paintings and Drawings

The Arts Council of Princeton of Princeton is pleased to present an exhibition of wildlife related artworks by Charles David Viera in support of the Wildlife Painting and Drawing class offered for adults.

Horses, wolves, birds, and other animals are featured in these paintings and drawings for the aesthetic value and emotional impact that they inspire in this artist and longtime ACP instructor. The public is invited to join us for the exhibition opening, enjoy the exhibition, and register for the accompanying studio class.

[caption id="attachment_23677" align="aligncenter" width="492"] Fox Hunt : Duck
20 x 20 inches
Acrylic[/caption]

Monday, May 13

Open Drawing Workshop

- $15/$13 ACP Members

Open Drawing Workshop is a monitored, non-instructional workshop in which artists can work at their own pace in the medium of their selection (no turpentine-based oil paints, please) from a live nude model in short and sustained poses. Chairs and a limited number of easels are available. Students must provide their own materials. Come as often as you like throughout the year!


REGISTRATION IS NOT REQUIRED —just drop in and pay at the door ($15/$13 ACP members). Canceled on all Holiday Mondays.

Pinot Tombola Preview

The Pinot to Picasso Tombola Preview showcases the Tombola artwork for the Arts Council’s signature art and wine spring fundraiser, Pinot to Picasso. The Tombola preview includes works of original artwork donated by local and regional professional artists.

 

 

[caption id="attachment_24275" align="aligncenter" width="300"] Daddy’s Coming #2
Charles David Viera[/caption] [caption id="attachment_24274" align="aligncenter" width="300"] Mesh
Patrick Strzelec[/caption]

 

[caption id="attachment_24276" align="aligncenter" width="297"] Can We Talk About Outbreak?
Ifat Shatsky[/caption] [caption id="attachment_24277" align="aligncenter" width="300"] Forgive Yourself
Mira DeMartino[/caption] [caption id="attachment_24270" align="aligncenter" width="241"] Back Street in Hope Town, Bahamas
Meg Brinster Michael[/caption]

 

[caption id="attachment_24271" align="aligncenter" width="288"] Tribal Etching
Caryn Newman[/caption]

 

[caption id="attachment_24273" align="aligncenter" width="300"] Quidnet, Nantucket
Robin Resch[/caption]

 

The Concussion Diaries

“I suffered a serious concussion in April 2017. Alice fell down a rabbit hole; I just fell on the floor. The doctors forbade ‘reading, screens of any sort, and complex thinking.’ For the first four months I couldn’t even listen to music. I wondered if I might go bonkers – and then I wondered if that was complex thinking. Without the capacity for the usual distractions, I found myself in a quiet world of color and composition. In some ways my sensory experience was stripped down, but in other ways it was heightened. On the daily walks required for my recovery, I noticed every detail of spring in New Jersey – leaves unfurling, vines encircling, the patterns in moss – with a piercing intensity.

At the suggestion of a friend I started painting. I had spent a lifetime deeply engaged by twentieth-century American artists and poets. My icons were the two Helens of New York, Frankenthaler and Levitt, and the poets Robert Hass and John Ashbery. At various points my artistic energy went into making photography, writing poetry and weaving, but I had always considered painting off limits. The concussion eliminated my silly, self-imposed restraints, and painting turned the disaster into discovery.

My limited faculties when I started painting freed me from spending any time thinking about why I was painting and what I was trying to say with my work. Two of my paintings, Charlottesville and Categoría Cinco (Maria) are direct responses to current events, but the others are explorations of technique, color and form. Asking myself now about the why and the what, I am reminded of a talk I went to by the photographers Laura McPhee and Virginia Beahan. In response to a student who asked about pursuing a career in art, one of them said, ‘If you don’t need to make photographs, you won’t.’ I am still finding my way as a painter, but I can say for certain that I need to make paintings.”

-Terri Riendeau

The Periodic Table of Elements


“My work has always been inspired, to one degree or another, by my interest and attention to the Sciences.


This new body of work, THE PERIODIC TABLE OF ELEMENTS, gets to the essence of life and ecosystems by focusing on the natural “elements” themselves which make everything in the natural and synthetic worlds possible.


Congruent with this are my own principle interests with surface and materiality as each work is an experiment with materials and texture – mixing a variety of gels and other additives to the paints in order to achieve the desired effect.  This is the driving force for me with relation to this project. Each element presents a new set of characteristics that need to be studied and assessed. This pushes me to experiment with textures and material effects that speak directly to the physical properties of each element, as well as, direct the color and compositional aspects of the work.  I consider experimentation and imagination to be the two key components in all creative endeavors and these are intrinsic to the creative process in general.


For me, every work should move forward in some way – never repeating motifs or notions about plasticity in order to attain consistency. Rather, painting is first and foremost about attention and discovery – attention for the sake of understanding and discovery for the sake of expression.”

-Robert DiMatteo

 

WILD: Wildlife Paintings and Drawings

The Arts Council of Princeton of Princeton is pleased to present an exhibition of wildlife related artworks by Charles David Viera in support of the Wildlife Painting and Drawing class offered for adults.

Horses, wolves, birds, and other animals are featured in these paintings and drawings for the aesthetic value and emotional impact that they inspire in this artist and longtime ACP instructor. The public is invited to join us for the exhibition opening, enjoy the exhibition, and register for the accompanying studio class.

[caption id="attachment_23677" align="aligncenter" width="492"] Fox Hunt : Duck
20 x 20 inches
Acrylic[/caption]

Tuesday, May 14

Pinot Tombola Preview

The Pinot to Picasso Tombola Preview showcases the Tombola artwork for the Arts Council’s signature art and wine spring fundraiser, Pinot to Picasso. The Tombola preview includes works of original artwork donated by local and regional professional artists.

 

 

[caption id="attachment_24275" align="aligncenter" width="300"] Daddy’s Coming #2
Charles David Viera[/caption] [caption id="attachment_24274" align="aligncenter" width="300"] Mesh
Patrick Strzelec[/caption]

 

[caption id="attachment_24276" align="aligncenter" width="297"] Can We Talk About Outbreak?
Ifat Shatsky[/caption] [caption id="attachment_24277" align="aligncenter" width="300"] Forgive Yourself
Mira DeMartino[/caption] [caption id="attachment_24270" align="aligncenter" width="241"] Back Street in Hope Town, Bahamas
Meg Brinster Michael[/caption]

 

[caption id="attachment_24271" align="aligncenter" width="288"] Tribal Etching
Caryn Newman[/caption]

 

[caption id="attachment_24273" align="aligncenter" width="300"] Quidnet, Nantucket
Robin Resch[/caption]

 

The Concussion Diaries

“I suffered a serious concussion in April 2017. Alice fell down a rabbit hole; I just fell on the floor. The doctors forbade ‘reading, screens of any sort, and complex thinking.’ For the first four months I couldn’t even listen to music. I wondered if I might go bonkers – and then I wondered if that was complex thinking. Without the capacity for the usual distractions, I found myself in a quiet world of color and composition. In some ways my sensory experience was stripped down, but in other ways it was heightened. On the daily walks required for my recovery, I noticed every detail of spring in New Jersey – leaves unfurling, vines encircling, the patterns in moss – with a piercing intensity.

At the suggestion of a friend I started painting. I had spent a lifetime deeply engaged by twentieth-century American artists and poets. My icons were the two Helens of New York, Frankenthaler and Levitt, and the poets Robert Hass and John Ashbery. At various points my artistic energy went into making photography, writing poetry and weaving, but I had always considered painting off limits. The concussion eliminated my silly, self-imposed restraints, and painting turned the disaster into discovery.

My limited faculties when I started painting freed me from spending any time thinking about why I was painting and what I was trying to say with my work. Two of my paintings, Charlottesville and Categoría Cinco (Maria) are direct responses to current events, but the others are explorations of technique, color and form. Asking myself now about the why and the what, I am reminded of a talk I went to by the photographers Laura McPhee and Virginia Beahan. In response to a student who asked about pursuing a career in art, one of them said, ‘If you don’t need to make photographs, you won’t.’ I am still finding my way as a painter, but I can say for certain that I need to make paintings.”

-Terri Riendeau

The Periodic Table of Elements


“My work has always been inspired, to one degree or another, by my interest and attention to the Sciences.


This new body of work, THE PERIODIC TABLE OF ELEMENTS, gets to the essence of life and ecosystems by focusing on the natural “elements” themselves which make everything in the natural and synthetic worlds possible.


Congruent with this are my own principle interests with surface and materiality as each work is an experiment with materials and texture – mixing a variety of gels and other additives to the paints in order to achieve the desired effect.  This is the driving force for me with relation to this project. Each element presents a new set of characteristics that need to be studied and assessed. This pushes me to experiment with textures and material effects that speak directly to the physical properties of each element, as well as, direct the color and compositional aspects of the work.  I consider experimentation and imagination to be the two key components in all creative endeavors and these are intrinsic to the creative process in general.


For me, every work should move forward in some way – never repeating motifs or notions about plasticity in order to attain consistency. Rather, painting is first and foremost about attention and discovery – attention for the sake of understanding and discovery for the sake of expression.”

-Robert DiMatteo

 

WILD: Wildlife Paintings and Drawings

The Arts Council of Princeton of Princeton is pleased to present an exhibition of wildlife related artworks by Charles David Viera in support of the Wildlife Painting and Drawing class offered for adults.

Horses, wolves, birds, and other animals are featured in these paintings and drawings for the aesthetic value and emotional impact that they inspire in this artist and longtime ACP instructor. The public is invited to join us for the exhibition opening, enjoy the exhibition, and register for the accompanying studio class.

[caption id="attachment_23677" align="aligncenter" width="492"] Fox Hunt : Duck
20 x 20 inches
Acrylic[/caption]

Wednesday, May 15

The Concussion Diaries

“I suffered a serious concussion in April 2017. Alice fell down a rabbit hole; I just fell on the floor. The doctors forbade ‘reading, screens of any sort, and complex thinking.’ For the first four months I couldn’t even listen to music. I wondered if I might go bonkers – and then I wondered if that was complex thinking. Without the capacity for the usual distractions, I found myself in a quiet world of color and composition. In some ways my sensory experience was stripped down, but in other ways it was heightened. On the daily walks required for my recovery, I noticed every detail of spring in New Jersey – leaves unfurling, vines encircling, the patterns in moss – with a piercing intensity.

At the suggestion of a friend I started painting. I had spent a lifetime deeply engaged by twentieth-century American artists and poets. My icons were the two Helens of New York, Frankenthaler and Levitt, and the poets Robert Hass and John Ashbery. At various points my artistic energy went into making photography, writing poetry and weaving, but I had always considered painting off limits. The concussion eliminated my silly, self-imposed restraints, and painting turned the disaster into discovery.

My limited faculties when I started painting freed me from spending any time thinking about why I was painting and what I was trying to say with my work. Two of my paintings, Charlottesville and Categoría Cinco (Maria) are direct responses to current events, but the others are explorations of technique, color and form. Asking myself now about the why and the what, I am reminded of a talk I went to by the photographers Laura McPhee and Virginia Beahan. In response to a student who asked about pursuing a career in art, one of them said, ‘If you don’t need to make photographs, you won’t.’ I am still finding my way as a painter, but I can say for certain that I need to make paintings.”

-Terri Riendeau

The Periodic Table of Elements


“My work has always been inspired, to one degree or another, by my interest and attention to the Sciences.


This new body of work, THE PERIODIC TABLE OF ELEMENTS, gets to the essence of life and ecosystems by focusing on the natural “elements” themselves which make everything in the natural and synthetic worlds possible.


Congruent with this are my own principle interests with surface and materiality as each work is an experiment with materials and texture – mixing a variety of gels and other additives to the paints in order to achieve the desired effect.  This is the driving force for me with relation to this project. Each element presents a new set of characteristics that need to be studied and assessed. This pushes me to experiment with textures and material effects that speak directly to the physical properties of each element, as well as, direct the color and compositional aspects of the work.  I consider experimentation and imagination to be the two key components in all creative endeavors and these are intrinsic to the creative process in general.


For me, every work should move forward in some way – never repeating motifs or notions about plasticity in order to attain consistency. Rather, painting is first and foremost about attention and discovery – attention for the sake of understanding and discovery for the sake of expression.”

-Robert DiMatteo

 

WILD: Wildlife Paintings and Drawings

The Arts Council of Princeton of Princeton is pleased to present an exhibition of wildlife related artworks by Charles David Viera in support of the Wildlife Painting and Drawing class offered for adults.

Horses, wolves, birds, and other animals are featured in these paintings and drawings for the aesthetic value and emotional impact that they inspire in this artist and longtime ACP instructor. The public is invited to join us for the exhibition opening, enjoy the exhibition, and register for the accompanying studio class.

[caption id="attachment_23677" align="aligncenter" width="492"] Fox Hunt : Duck
20 x 20 inches
Acrylic[/caption]