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Wednesday, June 5

OptOutside: Friends of Princeton Open Space Photography Exhibition

 

Each year, Friends of Open Space holds a photo contest that kicks-off during their #OptOutside event the day after Thanksgiving, aka Black Friday, to encourage outdoor time enjoying nature rather than shopping indoors. This OptOutside Photo Exhibition is a culmination of captures from recent years of Princeton’s Billy Johnson Mountain Lakes Nature Preserve taken by amateur and professional photographers alike.

 

About Princeton Open Space (FOPOS):

Now in its 50th year, FOPOS is a nonprofit organization dedicated to acquiring open space in Princeton for preservation, protecting natural resources, maintaining accessibility to trails, and providing environmental education. As part of their mission, they work with groups in the Princeton region to support efforts to preserve and protect open space and the environment.

 

[caption id="attachment_24565" align="aligncenter" width="520"] Toni M. Alfonso, Light on the Waters[/caption] [caption id="attachment_24564" align="aligncenter" width="530"] Sam Mao, The Color of Nature[/caption] [caption id="attachment_24563" align="aligncenter" width="534"] Samuel Vovsi, Looking in the Sky[/caption]

The Concussion Diaries

“I suffered a serious concussion in April 2017. Alice fell down a rabbit hole; I just fell on the floor. The doctors forbade ‘reading, screens of any sort, and complex thinking.’ For the first four months I couldn’t even listen to music. I wondered if I might go bonkers – and then I wondered if that was complex thinking. Without the capacity for the usual distractions, I found myself in a quiet world of color and composition. In some ways my sensory experience was stripped down, but in other ways it was heightened. On the daily walks required for my recovery, I noticed every detail of spring in New Jersey – leaves unfurling, vines encircling, the patterns in moss – with a piercing intensity.

At the suggestion of a friend I started painting. I had spent a lifetime deeply engaged by twentieth-century American artists and poets. My icons were the two Helens of New York, Frankenthaler and Levitt, and the poets Robert Hass and John Ashbery. At various points my artistic energy went into making photography, writing poetry and weaving, but I had always considered painting off limits. The concussion eliminated my silly, self-imposed restraints, and painting turned the disaster into discovery.

My limited faculties when I started painting freed me from spending any time thinking about why I was painting and what I was trying to say with my work. Two of my paintings, Charlottesville and Categoría Cinco (Maria) are direct responses to current events, but the others are explorations of technique, color and form. Asking myself now about the why and the what, I am reminded of a talk I went to by the photographers Laura McPhee and Virginia Beahan. In response to a student who asked about pursuing a career in art, one of them said, ‘If you don’t need to make photographs, you won’t.’ I am still finding my way as a painter, but I can say for certain that I need to make paintings.”

-Terri Riendeau

The Periodic Table of Elements


“My work has always been inspired, to one degree or another, by my interest and attention to the Sciences.


This new body of work, THE PERIODIC TABLE OF ELEMENTS, gets to the essence of life and ecosystems by focusing on the natural “elements” themselves which make everything in the natural and synthetic worlds possible.


Congruent with this are my own principle interests with surface and materiality as each work is an experiment with materials and texture – mixing a variety of gels and other additives to the paints in order to achieve the desired effect.  This is the driving force for me with relation to this project. Each element presents a new set of characteristics that need to be studied and assessed. This pushes me to experiment with textures and material effects that speak directly to the physical properties of each element, as well as, direct the color and compositional aspects of the work.  I consider experimentation and imagination to be the two key components in all creative endeavors and these are intrinsic to the creative process in general.


For me, every work should move forward in some way – never repeating motifs or notions about plasticity in order to attain consistency. Rather, painting is first and foremost about attention and discovery – attention for the sake of understanding and discovery for the sake of expression.”

-Robert DiMatteo

 

Waves and Ripples

This project is a celebration of water and a metaphor for life and human emotions.

Thursday, June 6

Annual Members Meeting 2019

- Free and Open to the Public!

Celebrate your love for the arts! Join us for an informal Members Meeting in our Taplin Gallery on Thursday, June 6 at 7pm. We’ll recap an amazing year of building community through the arts, vote on the slate of Board Trustees nominees, and distribute the Pride of the Arts Council Awards and Charles Evans Scholarship Awards. Additionally, our Members Meeting is a great opportunity to learn about volunteer opportunities, membership benefits, our Circle of Friends, and more! Enjoy a live cello performance by Christina Gullans and light refreshments.

OptOutside: Friends of Princeton Open Space Photography Exhibition

 

Each year, Friends of Open Space holds a photo contest that kicks-off during their #OptOutside event the day after Thanksgiving, aka Black Friday, to encourage outdoor time enjoying nature rather than shopping indoors. This OptOutside Photo Exhibition is a culmination of captures from recent years of Princeton’s Billy Johnson Mountain Lakes Nature Preserve taken by amateur and professional photographers alike.

 

About Princeton Open Space (FOPOS):

Now in its 50th year, FOPOS is a nonprofit organization dedicated to acquiring open space in Princeton for preservation, protecting natural resources, maintaining accessibility to trails, and providing environmental education. As part of their mission, they work with groups in the Princeton region to support efforts to preserve and protect open space and the environment.

 

[caption id="attachment_24565" align="aligncenter" width="520"] Toni M. Alfonso, Light on the Waters[/caption] [caption id="attachment_24564" align="aligncenter" width="530"] Sam Mao, The Color of Nature[/caption] [caption id="attachment_24563" align="aligncenter" width="534"] Samuel Vovsi, Looking in the Sky[/caption]

The Concussion Diaries

“I suffered a serious concussion in April 2017. Alice fell down a rabbit hole; I just fell on the floor. The doctors forbade ‘reading, screens of any sort, and complex thinking.’ For the first four months I couldn’t even listen to music. I wondered if I might go bonkers – and then I wondered if that was complex thinking. Without the capacity for the usual distractions, I found myself in a quiet world of color and composition. In some ways my sensory experience was stripped down, but in other ways it was heightened. On the daily walks required for my recovery, I noticed every detail of spring in New Jersey – leaves unfurling, vines encircling, the patterns in moss – with a piercing intensity.

At the suggestion of a friend I started painting. I had spent a lifetime deeply engaged by twentieth-century American artists and poets. My icons were the two Helens of New York, Frankenthaler and Levitt, and the poets Robert Hass and John Ashbery. At various points my artistic energy went into making photography, writing poetry and weaving, but I had always considered painting off limits. The concussion eliminated my silly, self-imposed restraints, and painting turned the disaster into discovery.

My limited faculties when I started painting freed me from spending any time thinking about why I was painting and what I was trying to say with my work. Two of my paintings, Charlottesville and Categoría Cinco (Maria) are direct responses to current events, but the others are explorations of technique, color and form. Asking myself now about the why and the what, I am reminded of a talk I went to by the photographers Laura McPhee and Virginia Beahan. In response to a student who asked about pursuing a career in art, one of them said, ‘If you don’t need to make photographs, you won’t.’ I am still finding my way as a painter, but I can say for certain that I need to make paintings.”

-Terri Riendeau

The Periodic Table of Elements


“My work has always been inspired, to one degree or another, by my interest and attention to the Sciences.


This new body of work, THE PERIODIC TABLE OF ELEMENTS, gets to the essence of life and ecosystems by focusing on the natural “elements” themselves which make everything in the natural and synthetic worlds possible.


Congruent with this are my own principle interests with surface and materiality as each work is an experiment with materials and texture – mixing a variety of gels and other additives to the paints in order to achieve the desired effect.  This is the driving force for me with relation to this project. Each element presents a new set of characteristics that need to be studied and assessed. This pushes me to experiment with textures and material effects that speak directly to the physical properties of each element, as well as, direct the color and compositional aspects of the work.  I consider experimentation and imagination to be the two key components in all creative endeavors and these are intrinsic to the creative process in general.


For me, every work should move forward in some way – never repeating motifs or notions about plasticity in order to attain consistency. Rather, painting is first and foremost about attention and discovery – attention for the sake of understanding and discovery for the sake of expression.”

-Robert DiMatteo

 

Waves and Ripples

This project is a celebration of water and a metaphor for life and human emotions.

Friday, June 7

Just Wing It!: Community Stage Event

- Free and Open to the Public!

Join the Arts Council of Princeton for a performance by Just Wing It!

Just Wing It is Princeton High School’s only improv comedy troupe, showcasing a form of live theatre in which the plot, characters and dialogue of a game, scene or story are made up in the moment based on audience suggestions.

This performance is part of the Arts Council of Princeton’s Community Stage Series. Community Stage productions are free (and nearly free) held in collaboration with local artistic groups and organizations. Community Stage programming enable the Arts Council’s Solley Theater to act as an accessible space for community partnerships and high-quality artistic experiences.

OptOutside: Friends of Princeton Open Space Photography Exhibition

 

Each year, Friends of Open Space holds a photo contest that kicks-off during their #OptOutside event the day after Thanksgiving, aka Black Friday, to encourage outdoor time enjoying nature rather than shopping indoors. This OptOutside Photo Exhibition is a culmination of captures from recent years of Princeton’s Billy Johnson Mountain Lakes Nature Preserve taken by amateur and professional photographers alike.

 

About Princeton Open Space (FOPOS):

Now in its 50th year, FOPOS is a nonprofit organization dedicated to acquiring open space in Princeton for preservation, protecting natural resources, maintaining accessibility to trails, and providing environmental education. As part of their mission, they work with groups in the Princeton region to support efforts to preserve and protect open space and the environment.

 

[caption id="attachment_24565" align="aligncenter" width="520"] Toni M. Alfonso, Light on the Waters[/caption] [caption id="attachment_24564" align="aligncenter" width="530"] Sam Mao, The Color of Nature[/caption] [caption id="attachment_24563" align="aligncenter" width="534"] Samuel Vovsi, Looking in the Sky[/caption]

The Concussion Diaries

“I suffered a serious concussion in April 2017. Alice fell down a rabbit hole; I just fell on the floor. The doctors forbade ‘reading, screens of any sort, and complex thinking.’ For the first four months I couldn’t even listen to music. I wondered if I might go bonkers – and then I wondered if that was complex thinking. Without the capacity for the usual distractions, I found myself in a quiet world of color and composition. In some ways my sensory experience was stripped down, but in other ways it was heightened. On the daily walks required for my recovery, I noticed every detail of spring in New Jersey – leaves unfurling, vines encircling, the patterns in moss – with a piercing intensity.

At the suggestion of a friend I started painting. I had spent a lifetime deeply engaged by twentieth-century American artists and poets. My icons were the two Helens of New York, Frankenthaler and Levitt, and the poets Robert Hass and John Ashbery. At various points my artistic energy went into making photography, writing poetry and weaving, but I had always considered painting off limits. The concussion eliminated my silly, self-imposed restraints, and painting turned the disaster into discovery.

My limited faculties when I started painting freed me from spending any time thinking about why I was painting and what I was trying to say with my work. Two of my paintings, Charlottesville and Categoría Cinco (Maria) are direct responses to current events, but the others are explorations of technique, color and form. Asking myself now about the why and the what, I am reminded of a talk I went to by the photographers Laura McPhee and Virginia Beahan. In response to a student who asked about pursuing a career in art, one of them said, ‘If you don’t need to make photographs, you won’t.’ I am still finding my way as a painter, but I can say for certain that I need to make paintings.”

-Terri Riendeau

The Periodic Table of Elements


“My work has always been inspired, to one degree or another, by my interest and attention to the Sciences.


This new body of work, THE PERIODIC TABLE OF ELEMENTS, gets to the essence of life and ecosystems by focusing on the natural “elements” themselves which make everything in the natural and synthetic worlds possible.


Congruent with this are my own principle interests with surface and materiality as each work is an experiment with materials and texture – mixing a variety of gels and other additives to the paints in order to achieve the desired effect.  This is the driving force for me with relation to this project. Each element presents a new set of characteristics that need to be studied and assessed. This pushes me to experiment with textures and material effects that speak directly to the physical properties of each element, as well as, direct the color and compositional aspects of the work.  I consider experimentation and imagination to be the two key components in all creative endeavors and these are intrinsic to the creative process in general.


For me, every work should move forward in some way – never repeating motifs or notions about plasticity in order to attain consistency. Rather, painting is first and foremost about attention and discovery – attention for the sake of understanding and discovery for the sake of expression.”

-Robert DiMatteo

 

Waves and Ripples

This project is a celebration of water and a metaphor for life and human emotions.

Saturday, June 8

Celebración! Flamenco Showcase

- Suggested Donation: $10

Celebración! is a Flamenco Choreography and Student Showcase celebrating Lisa Botalico’s 20th anniversary teaching for the Arts Council of Princeton.

OptOutside: Friends of Princeton Open Space Photography Exhibition

 

Each year, Friends of Open Space holds a photo contest that kicks-off during their #OptOutside event the day after Thanksgiving, aka Black Friday, to encourage outdoor time enjoying nature rather than shopping indoors. This OptOutside Photo Exhibition is a culmination of captures from recent years of Princeton’s Billy Johnson Mountain Lakes Nature Preserve taken by amateur and professional photographers alike.

 

About Princeton Open Space (FOPOS):

Now in its 50th year, FOPOS is a nonprofit organization dedicated to acquiring open space in Princeton for preservation, protecting natural resources, maintaining accessibility to trails, and providing environmental education. As part of their mission, they work with groups in the Princeton region to support efforts to preserve and protect open space and the environment.

 

[caption id="attachment_24565" align="aligncenter" width="520"] Toni M. Alfonso, Light on the Waters[/caption] [caption id="attachment_24564" align="aligncenter" width="530"] Sam Mao, The Color of Nature[/caption] [caption id="attachment_24563" align="aligncenter" width="534"] Samuel Vovsi, Looking in the Sky[/caption]

The Concussion Diaries

“I suffered a serious concussion in April 2017. Alice fell down a rabbit hole; I just fell on the floor. The doctors forbade ‘reading, screens of any sort, and complex thinking.’ For the first four months I couldn’t even listen to music. I wondered if I might go bonkers – and then I wondered if that was complex thinking. Without the capacity for the usual distractions, I found myself in a quiet world of color and composition. In some ways my sensory experience was stripped down, but in other ways it was heightened. On the daily walks required for my recovery, I noticed every detail of spring in New Jersey – leaves unfurling, vines encircling, the patterns in moss – with a piercing intensity.

At the suggestion of a friend I started painting. I had spent a lifetime deeply engaged by twentieth-century American artists and poets. My icons were the two Helens of New York, Frankenthaler and Levitt, and the poets Robert Hass and John Ashbery. At various points my artistic energy went into making photography, writing poetry and weaving, but I had always considered painting off limits. The concussion eliminated my silly, self-imposed restraints, and painting turned the disaster into discovery.

My limited faculties when I started painting freed me from spending any time thinking about why I was painting and what I was trying to say with my work. Two of my paintings, Charlottesville and Categoría Cinco (Maria) are direct responses to current events, but the others are explorations of technique, color and form. Asking myself now about the why and the what, I am reminded of a talk I went to by the photographers Laura McPhee and Virginia Beahan. In response to a student who asked about pursuing a career in art, one of them said, ‘If you don’t need to make photographs, you won’t.’ I am still finding my way as a painter, but I can say for certain that I need to make paintings.”

-Terri Riendeau

The Periodic Table of Elements


“My work has always been inspired, to one degree or another, by my interest and attention to the Sciences.


This new body of work, THE PERIODIC TABLE OF ELEMENTS, gets to the essence of life and ecosystems by focusing on the natural “elements” themselves which make everything in the natural and synthetic worlds possible.


Congruent with this are my own principle interests with surface and materiality as each work is an experiment with materials and texture – mixing a variety of gels and other additives to the paints in order to achieve the desired effect.  This is the driving force for me with relation to this project. Each element presents a new set of characteristics that need to be studied and assessed. This pushes me to experiment with textures and material effects that speak directly to the physical properties of each element, as well as, direct the color and compositional aspects of the work.  I consider experimentation and imagination to be the two key components in all creative endeavors and these are intrinsic to the creative process in general.


For me, every work should move forward in some way – never repeating motifs or notions about plasticity in order to attain consistency. Rather, painting is first and foremost about attention and discovery – attention for the sake of understanding and discovery for the sake of expression.”

-Robert DiMatteo

 

Waves and Ripples

This project is a celebration of water and a metaphor for life and human emotions.

Sunday, June 9

OptOutside: Friends of Princeton Open Space Photography Exhibition

 

Each year, Friends of Open Space holds a photo contest that kicks-off during their #OptOutside event the day after Thanksgiving, aka Black Friday, to encourage outdoor time enjoying nature rather than shopping indoors. This OptOutside Photo Exhibition is a culmination of captures from recent years of Princeton’s Billy Johnson Mountain Lakes Nature Preserve taken by amateur and professional photographers alike.

 

About Princeton Open Space (FOPOS):

Now in its 50th year, FOPOS is a nonprofit organization dedicated to acquiring open space in Princeton for preservation, protecting natural resources, maintaining accessibility to trails, and providing environmental education. As part of their mission, they work with groups in the Princeton region to support efforts to preserve and protect open space and the environment.

 

[caption id="attachment_24565" align="aligncenter" width="520"] Toni M. Alfonso, Light on the Waters[/caption] [caption id="attachment_24564" align="aligncenter" width="530"] Sam Mao, The Color of Nature[/caption] [caption id="attachment_24563" align="aligncenter" width="534"] Samuel Vovsi, Looking in the Sky[/caption]

Waves and Ripples

This project is a celebration of water and a metaphor for life and human emotions.

Monday, June 10

OptOutside: Friends of Princeton Open Space Photography Exhibition

 

Each year, Friends of Open Space holds a photo contest that kicks-off during their #OptOutside event the day after Thanksgiving, aka Black Friday, to encourage outdoor time enjoying nature rather than shopping indoors. This OptOutside Photo Exhibition is a culmination of captures from recent years of Princeton’s Billy Johnson Mountain Lakes Nature Preserve taken by amateur and professional photographers alike.

 

About Princeton Open Space (FOPOS):

Now in its 50th year, FOPOS is a nonprofit organization dedicated to acquiring open space in Princeton for preservation, protecting natural resources, maintaining accessibility to trails, and providing environmental education. As part of their mission, they work with groups in the Princeton region to support efforts to preserve and protect open space and the environment.

 

[caption id="attachment_24565" align="aligncenter" width="520"] Toni M. Alfonso, Light on the Waters[/caption] [caption id="attachment_24564" align="aligncenter" width="530"] Sam Mao, The Color of Nature[/caption] [caption id="attachment_24563" align="aligncenter" width="534"] Samuel Vovsi, Looking in the Sky[/caption]

Waves and Ripples

This project is a celebration of water and a metaphor for life and human emotions.

Tuesday, June 11

OptOutside: Friends of Princeton Open Space Photography Exhibition

 

Each year, Friends of Open Space holds a photo contest that kicks-off during their #OptOutside event the day after Thanksgiving, aka Black Friday, to encourage outdoor time enjoying nature rather than shopping indoors. This OptOutside Photo Exhibition is a culmination of captures from recent years of Princeton’s Billy Johnson Mountain Lakes Nature Preserve taken by amateur and professional photographers alike.

 

About Princeton Open Space (FOPOS):

Now in its 50th year, FOPOS is a nonprofit organization dedicated to acquiring open space in Princeton for preservation, protecting natural resources, maintaining accessibility to trails, and providing environmental education. As part of their mission, they work with groups in the Princeton region to support efforts to preserve and protect open space and the environment.

 

[caption id="attachment_24565" align="aligncenter" width="520"] Toni M. Alfonso, Light on the Waters[/caption] [caption id="attachment_24564" align="aligncenter" width="530"] Sam Mao, The Color of Nature[/caption] [caption id="attachment_24563" align="aligncenter" width="534"] Samuel Vovsi, Looking in the Sky[/caption]

Waves and Ripples

This project is a celebration of water and a metaphor for life and human emotions.