• Events & Performances
  • Exhibitions
  • Workshops
  • Community
  • Community Stage

Friday, July 5

LUMINOUS MATTER

My work LUMINOUS MATTER channels the forces of fluid dynamics. I achieve this otherworldly look in my artwork by combining pigments, fluids, and additives to produce a physical reaction. Layering different densities of paint leads to the formation of cellular structures that echo natural processes. Some of my results are comparable to phenomena that can be observed in astronomy, such as the Rayleigh-Taylor instability seen in The Crab Nebula.

To create my paintings, I myself mimic the forces of nature by using multiple types of energy. I use the kinetic movement of my hands and body, generating the power needed to facilitate a chemical reaction in the paint and additives. This chemical reaction itself shapes the structure and design of my work, taking on a life of its own. Finally, I apply heat and fire to my paintings — additional forms of energy — to further induce movement and dynamic interest.

I experiment to discover new ways to generate surprising and exciting results. With this end in mind, my work uses multiple mixed media approaches. Some of the raw materials that I use include acrylic paint, alcohol inks, encaustic paint, pigments, and epoxy resin.

-Fran Eber

Our Universe - From Here to Infinity

“I became interested in astronomy and the nature and scope of our universe when I first started to learn about these things in elementary school. But then decades passed where I focused on other things in life.

In 1999, my interest in astronomy was rekindled by my friend/colleague Kirk Alexander who was at the time the Director of the Amateur Astronomers Association of Princeton (AAAP). I bought myself a telescope and a tracking mount and tried to have a visual look at things from the backyard at my home about 8 miles north of downtown Princeton. Our Moon and the planets in our Solar System were awesome but most other things were too faint to see without driving a few hours to a darker location. Even at these darker places, most of the faint nebulae did not look nearly as impressive as what I would see published in the various astronomy magazines I was reading on a regular basis.

So, in 2003 I bought myself a digital camera designed for taking long exposure astrophotographs and I began imaging the universe. The star clusters, nebulae, and galaxies that I’ve been able to image from my backyard are stunningly beautiful and it’s been extremely interesting to learn about these objects… what they are, how big and how far away they are, and how they came to be. It is all very interesting and truly humbling.”

-Robert Vanderbei

Saturday, July 6

LUMINOUS MATTER

My work LUMINOUS MATTER channels the forces of fluid dynamics. I achieve this otherworldly look in my artwork by combining pigments, fluids, and additives to produce a physical reaction. Layering different densities of paint leads to the formation of cellular structures that echo natural processes. Some of my results are comparable to phenomena that can be observed in astronomy, such as the Rayleigh-Taylor instability seen in The Crab Nebula.

To create my paintings, I myself mimic the forces of nature by using multiple types of energy. I use the kinetic movement of my hands and body, generating the power needed to facilitate a chemical reaction in the paint and additives. This chemical reaction itself shapes the structure and design of my work, taking on a life of its own. Finally, I apply heat and fire to my paintings — additional forms of energy — to further induce movement and dynamic interest.

I experiment to discover new ways to generate surprising and exciting results. With this end in mind, my work uses multiple mixed media approaches. Some of the raw materials that I use include acrylic paint, alcohol inks, encaustic paint, pigments, and epoxy resin.

-Fran Eber

Our Universe - From Here to Infinity

“I became interested in astronomy and the nature and scope of our universe when I first started to learn about these things in elementary school. But then decades passed where I focused on other things in life.

In 1999, my interest in astronomy was rekindled by my friend/colleague Kirk Alexander who was at the time the Director of the Amateur Astronomers Association of Princeton (AAAP). I bought myself a telescope and a tracking mount and tried to have a visual look at things from the backyard at my home about 8 miles north of downtown Princeton. Our Moon and the planets in our Solar System were awesome but most other things were too faint to see without driving a few hours to a darker location. Even at these darker places, most of the faint nebulae did not look nearly as impressive as what I would see published in the various astronomy magazines I was reading on a regular basis.

So, in 2003 I bought myself a digital camera designed for taking long exposure astrophotographs and I began imaging the universe. The star clusters, nebulae, and galaxies that I’ve been able to image from my backyard are stunningly beautiful and it’s been extremely interesting to learn about these objects… what they are, how big and how far away they are, and how they came to be. It is all very interesting and truly humbling.”

-Robert Vanderbei

Sunday, July 7

LUMINOUS MATTER

My work LUMINOUS MATTER channels the forces of fluid dynamics. I achieve this otherworldly look in my artwork by combining pigments, fluids, and additives to produce a physical reaction. Layering different densities of paint leads to the formation of cellular structures that echo natural processes. Some of my results are comparable to phenomena that can be observed in astronomy, such as the Rayleigh-Taylor instability seen in The Crab Nebula.

To create my paintings, I myself mimic the forces of nature by using multiple types of energy. I use the kinetic movement of my hands and body, generating the power needed to facilitate a chemical reaction in the paint and additives. This chemical reaction itself shapes the structure and design of my work, taking on a life of its own. Finally, I apply heat and fire to my paintings — additional forms of energy — to further induce movement and dynamic interest.

I experiment to discover new ways to generate surprising and exciting results. With this end in mind, my work uses multiple mixed media approaches. Some of the raw materials that I use include acrylic paint, alcohol inks, encaustic paint, pigments, and epoxy resin.

-Fran Eber

Our Universe - From Here to Infinity

“I became interested in astronomy and the nature and scope of our universe when I first started to learn about these things in elementary school. But then decades passed where I focused on other things in life.

In 1999, my interest in astronomy was rekindled by my friend/colleague Kirk Alexander who was at the time the Director of the Amateur Astronomers Association of Princeton (AAAP). I bought myself a telescope and a tracking mount and tried to have a visual look at things from the backyard at my home about 8 miles north of downtown Princeton. Our Moon and the planets in our Solar System were awesome but most other things were too faint to see without driving a few hours to a darker location. Even at these darker places, most of the faint nebulae did not look nearly as impressive as what I would see published in the various astronomy magazines I was reading on a regular basis.

So, in 2003 I bought myself a digital camera designed for taking long exposure astrophotographs and I began imaging the universe. The star clusters, nebulae, and galaxies that I’ve been able to image from my backyard are stunningly beautiful and it’s been extremely interesting to learn about these objects… what they are, how big and how far away they are, and how they came to be. It is all very interesting and truly humbling.”

-Robert Vanderbei

Monday, July 8

LUMINOUS MATTER

My work LUMINOUS MATTER channels the forces of fluid dynamics. I achieve this otherworldly look in my artwork by combining pigments, fluids, and additives to produce a physical reaction. Layering different densities of paint leads to the formation of cellular structures that echo natural processes. Some of my results are comparable to phenomena that can be observed in astronomy, such as the Rayleigh-Taylor instability seen in The Crab Nebula.

To create my paintings, I myself mimic the forces of nature by using multiple types of energy. I use the kinetic movement of my hands and body, generating the power needed to facilitate a chemical reaction in the paint and additives. This chemical reaction itself shapes the structure and design of my work, taking on a life of its own. Finally, I apply heat and fire to my paintings — additional forms of energy — to further induce movement and dynamic interest.

I experiment to discover new ways to generate surprising and exciting results. With this end in mind, my work uses multiple mixed media approaches. Some of the raw materials that I use include acrylic paint, alcohol inks, encaustic paint, pigments, and epoxy resin.

-Fran Eber

Our Universe - From Here to Infinity

“I became interested in astronomy and the nature and scope of our universe when I first started to learn about these things in elementary school. But then decades passed where I focused on other things in life.

In 1999, my interest in astronomy was rekindled by my friend/colleague Kirk Alexander who was at the time the Director of the Amateur Astronomers Association of Princeton (AAAP). I bought myself a telescope and a tracking mount and tried to have a visual look at things from the backyard at my home about 8 miles north of downtown Princeton. Our Moon and the planets in our Solar System were awesome but most other things were too faint to see without driving a few hours to a darker location. Even at these darker places, most of the faint nebulae did not look nearly as impressive as what I would see published in the various astronomy magazines I was reading on a regular basis.

So, in 2003 I bought myself a digital camera designed for taking long exposure astrophotographs and I began imaging the universe. The star clusters, nebulae, and galaxies that I’ve been able to image from my backyard are stunningly beautiful and it’s been extremely interesting to learn about these objects… what they are, how big and how far away they are, and how they came to be. It is all very interesting and truly humbling.”

-Robert Vanderbei

Tuesday, July 9

LUMINOUS MATTER

My work LUMINOUS MATTER channels the forces of fluid dynamics. I achieve this otherworldly look in my artwork by combining pigments, fluids, and additives to produce a physical reaction. Layering different densities of paint leads to the formation of cellular structures that echo natural processes. Some of my results are comparable to phenomena that can be observed in astronomy, such as the Rayleigh-Taylor instability seen in The Crab Nebula.

To create my paintings, I myself mimic the forces of nature by using multiple types of energy. I use the kinetic movement of my hands and body, generating the power needed to facilitate a chemical reaction in the paint and additives. This chemical reaction itself shapes the structure and design of my work, taking on a life of its own. Finally, I apply heat and fire to my paintings — additional forms of energy — to further induce movement and dynamic interest.

I experiment to discover new ways to generate surprising and exciting results. With this end in mind, my work uses multiple mixed media approaches. Some of the raw materials that I use include acrylic paint, alcohol inks, encaustic paint, pigments, and epoxy resin.

-Fran Eber

Our Universe - From Here to Infinity

“I became interested in astronomy and the nature and scope of our universe when I first started to learn about these things in elementary school. But then decades passed where I focused on other things in life.

In 1999, my interest in astronomy was rekindled by my friend/colleague Kirk Alexander who was at the time the Director of the Amateur Astronomers Association of Princeton (AAAP). I bought myself a telescope and a tracking mount and tried to have a visual look at things from the backyard at my home about 8 miles north of downtown Princeton. Our Moon and the planets in our Solar System were awesome but most other things were too faint to see without driving a few hours to a darker location. Even at these darker places, most of the faint nebulae did not look nearly as impressive as what I would see published in the various astronomy magazines I was reading on a regular basis.

So, in 2003 I bought myself a digital camera designed for taking long exposure astrophotographs and I began imaging the universe. The star clusters, nebulae, and galaxies that I’ve been able to image from my backyard are stunningly beautiful and it’s been extremely interesting to learn about these objects… what they are, how big and how far away they are, and how they came to be. It is all very interesting and truly humbling.”

-Robert Vanderbei

Wednesday, July 10

LUMINOUS MATTER

My work LUMINOUS MATTER channels the forces of fluid dynamics. I achieve this otherworldly look in my artwork by combining pigments, fluids, and additives to produce a physical reaction. Layering different densities of paint leads to the formation of cellular structures that echo natural processes. Some of my results are comparable to phenomena that can be observed in astronomy, such as the Rayleigh-Taylor instability seen in The Crab Nebula.

To create my paintings, I myself mimic the forces of nature by using multiple types of energy. I use the kinetic movement of my hands and body, generating the power needed to facilitate a chemical reaction in the paint and additives. This chemical reaction itself shapes the structure and design of my work, taking on a life of its own. Finally, I apply heat and fire to my paintings — additional forms of energy — to further induce movement and dynamic interest.

I experiment to discover new ways to generate surprising and exciting results. With this end in mind, my work uses multiple mixed media approaches. Some of the raw materials that I use include acrylic paint, alcohol inks, encaustic paint, pigments, and epoxy resin.

-Fran Eber

Our Universe - From Here to Infinity

“I became interested in astronomy and the nature and scope of our universe when I first started to learn about these things in elementary school. But then decades passed where I focused on other things in life.

In 1999, my interest in astronomy was rekindled by my friend/colleague Kirk Alexander who was at the time the Director of the Amateur Astronomers Association of Princeton (AAAP). I bought myself a telescope and a tracking mount and tried to have a visual look at things from the backyard at my home about 8 miles north of downtown Princeton. Our Moon and the planets in our Solar System were awesome but most other things were too faint to see without driving a few hours to a darker location. Even at these darker places, most of the faint nebulae did not look nearly as impressive as what I would see published in the various astronomy magazines I was reading on a regular basis.

So, in 2003 I bought myself a digital camera designed for taking long exposure astrophotographs and I began imaging the universe. The star clusters, nebulae, and galaxies that I’ve been able to image from my backyard are stunningly beautiful and it’s been extremely interesting to learn about these objects… what they are, how big and how far away they are, and how they came to be. It is all very interesting and truly humbling.”

-Robert Vanderbei

Thursday, July 11

Summer Courtyard Concert Series: Essie

- Free and Open to the Public!
[caption id="" align="aligncenter" width="335"] .[/caption]

Join the Arts Council of Princeton in the Princeton Shopping Center Courtyard for the annual Summer Concert Series, featuring the best in local and regional rock, funk, folk, world, blues, and more!

 

Enjoy some fun in the summer sun with the high energy and powerful vocals of Essie. Essie’s sound consists of a wide variety of styles including rock, soul, funk, reggae, and pop! You’ll be dancing along to covers you love and some groovy and bluesy originals tunes as well! Essie’s shows are ones you don’t want to miss and you won’t soon forget!

This concert is sponsored by:
New York Sports Club: Participate in a free Zumba class in the courtyard to the music  being played on stage! Then, enter into a raffle to win a one-month NYSC membership.
LiLLiPiES: Celebrate LiLLiPiES’ 3rd birthday with a special treat! Enjoy cookie and donut ice cream sandwiches made with the bent spoon ice cream for $5.

Join us every Thursday, 6–8 pm, from June 27–August 29, at the Princeton Shopping Center, 301 N. Harrison Street, Princeton, NJ. To view a full lineup of performances, click here!

LUMINOUS MATTER

My work LUMINOUS MATTER channels the forces of fluid dynamics. I achieve this otherworldly look in my artwork by combining pigments, fluids, and additives to produce a physical reaction. Layering different densities of paint leads to the formation of cellular structures that echo natural processes. Some of my results are comparable to phenomena that can be observed in astronomy, such as the Rayleigh-Taylor instability seen in The Crab Nebula.

To create my paintings, I myself mimic the forces of nature by using multiple types of energy. I use the kinetic movement of my hands and body, generating the power needed to facilitate a chemical reaction in the paint and additives. This chemical reaction itself shapes the structure and design of my work, taking on a life of its own. Finally, I apply heat and fire to my paintings — additional forms of energy — to further induce movement and dynamic interest.

I experiment to discover new ways to generate surprising and exciting results. With this end in mind, my work uses multiple mixed media approaches. Some of the raw materials that I use include acrylic paint, alcohol inks, encaustic paint, pigments, and epoxy resin.

-Fran Eber

Our Universe - From Here to Infinity

“I became interested in astronomy and the nature and scope of our universe when I first started to learn about these things in elementary school. But then decades passed where I focused on other things in life.

In 1999, my interest in astronomy was rekindled by my friend/colleague Kirk Alexander who was at the time the Director of the Amateur Astronomers Association of Princeton (AAAP). I bought myself a telescope and a tracking mount and tried to have a visual look at things from the backyard at my home about 8 miles north of downtown Princeton. Our Moon and the planets in our Solar System were awesome but most other things were too faint to see without driving a few hours to a darker location. Even at these darker places, most of the faint nebulae did not look nearly as impressive as what I would see published in the various astronomy magazines I was reading on a regular basis.

So, in 2003 I bought myself a digital camera designed for taking long exposure astrophotographs and I began imaging the universe. The star clusters, nebulae, and galaxies that I’ve been able to image from my backyard are stunningly beautiful and it’s been extremely interesting to learn about these objects… what they are, how big and how far away they are, and how they came to be. It is all very interesting and truly humbling.”

-Robert Vanderbei