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Thursday, September 5

Chip Fisher Memorial Exhibition

The Chip Fisher Memorial Exhibition is held in conjunction with the annual Joint Effort Safe Streets Program. On view in the Arts Council of Princeton’s second-level Solley Lobby Gallery, the exhibition features the paintings of Aaron Fisher and collages by Tracey Hill.

A reception will be held on Wednesday, August 7 at 5:30pm.

 

LUMINOUS MATTER

My work LUMINOUS MATTER channels the forces of fluid dynamics. I achieve this otherworldly look in my artwork by combining pigments, fluids, and additives to produce a physical reaction. Layering different densities of paint leads to the formation of cellular structures that echo natural processes. Some of my results are comparable to phenomena that can be observed in astronomy, such as the Rayleigh-Taylor instability seen in The Crab Nebula.

To create my paintings, I myself mimic the forces of nature by using multiple types of energy. I use the kinetic movement of my hands and body, generating the power needed to facilitate a chemical reaction in the paint and additives. This chemical reaction itself shapes the structure and design of my work, taking on a life of its own. Finally, I apply heat and fire to my paintings — additional forms of energy — to further induce movement and dynamic interest.

I experiment to discover new ways to generate surprising and exciting results. With this end in mind, my work uses multiple mixed media approaches. Some of the raw materials that I use include acrylic paint, alcohol inks, encaustic paint, pigments, and epoxy resin.

-Fran Eber

Our Universe - From Here to Infinity

“I became interested in astronomy and the nature and scope of our universe when I first started to learn about these things in elementary school. But then decades passed where I focused on other things in life.

In 1999, my interest in astronomy was rekindled by my friend/colleague Kirk Alexander who was at the time the Director of the Amateur Astronomers Association of Princeton (AAAP). I bought myself a telescope and a tracking mount and tried to have a visual look at things from the backyard at my home about 8 miles north of downtown Princeton. Our Moon and the planets in our Solar System were awesome but most other things were too faint to see without driving a few hours to a darker location. Even at these darker places, most of the faint nebulae did not look nearly as impressive as what I would see published in the various astronomy magazines I was reading on a regular basis.

So, in 2003 I bought myself a digital camera designed for taking long exposure astrophotographs and I began imaging the universe. The star clusters, nebulae, and galaxies that I’ve been able to image from my backyard are stunningly beautiful and it’s been extremely interesting to learn about these objects… what they are, how big and how far away they are, and how they came to be. It is all very interesting and truly humbling.”

-Robert Vanderbei

Friday, September 6

Chip Fisher Memorial Exhibition

The Chip Fisher Memorial Exhibition is held in conjunction with the annual Joint Effort Safe Streets Program. On view in the Arts Council of Princeton’s second-level Solley Lobby Gallery, the exhibition features the paintings of Aaron Fisher and collages by Tracey Hill.

A reception will be held on Wednesday, August 7 at 5:30pm.

 

LUMINOUS MATTER

My work LUMINOUS MATTER channels the forces of fluid dynamics. I achieve this otherworldly look in my artwork by combining pigments, fluids, and additives to produce a physical reaction. Layering different densities of paint leads to the formation of cellular structures that echo natural processes. Some of my results are comparable to phenomena that can be observed in astronomy, such as the Rayleigh-Taylor instability seen in The Crab Nebula.

To create my paintings, I myself mimic the forces of nature by using multiple types of energy. I use the kinetic movement of my hands and body, generating the power needed to facilitate a chemical reaction in the paint and additives. This chemical reaction itself shapes the structure and design of my work, taking on a life of its own. Finally, I apply heat and fire to my paintings — additional forms of energy — to further induce movement and dynamic interest.

I experiment to discover new ways to generate surprising and exciting results. With this end in mind, my work uses multiple mixed media approaches. Some of the raw materials that I use include acrylic paint, alcohol inks, encaustic paint, pigments, and epoxy resin.

-Fran Eber

Our Universe - From Here to Infinity

“I became interested in astronomy and the nature and scope of our universe when I first started to learn about these things in elementary school. But then decades passed where I focused on other things in life.

In 1999, my interest in astronomy was rekindled by my friend/colleague Kirk Alexander who was at the time the Director of the Amateur Astronomers Association of Princeton (AAAP). I bought myself a telescope and a tracking mount and tried to have a visual look at things from the backyard at my home about 8 miles north of downtown Princeton. Our Moon and the planets in our Solar System were awesome but most other things were too faint to see without driving a few hours to a darker location. Even at these darker places, most of the faint nebulae did not look nearly as impressive as what I would see published in the various astronomy magazines I was reading on a regular basis.

So, in 2003 I bought myself a digital camera designed for taking long exposure astrophotographs and I began imaging the universe. The star clusters, nebulae, and galaxies that I’ve been able to image from my backyard are stunningly beautiful and it’s been extremely interesting to learn about these objects… what they are, how big and how far away they are, and how they came to be. It is all very interesting and truly humbling.”

-Robert Vanderbei

Saturday, September 7

Fall Open House 2019

- Free and Open to the Public!

The Arts Council of Princeton will host its annual Fall Open House, featuring hands-on artmaking and artist demos, live performances, and more! Contribute to a community mural and meet ACP instructors, including featured installation artist Eva Mantell.

The ACP’s award-winning Taplin Gallery will be open with a new exhibition, Wonder, on view. Featuring the work of Marilyn Keating, Eric Schultz, and The Oiseaux Sisters, the space is filled with kites, figures composed of scrap metal parts, paper mache birds, wooden pull toys, and so many other one-of-a-kind elements. Like a kid in a toy store, you won’t be able to stop smiling, imagining how all of these items came into being. To sweeten the deal, enjoy cookies from Milk and Cookies Princeton!

During the Open House, enter for a chance to win prize bundles that include art supplies and gift cards from beloved local businesses including:

The Fall Open House is free and open to the public! All are welcome.

 

Opening Reception: Wonder

- Free and Open to the Public!

During the Fall Open House, the Arts Council’s award-winning Taplin Gallery will feature the  Opening Reception of “Wonder”, showcasing the work of Marilyn Keating, Eric Schultz, and the Oiseaux Sisters, Susan Andrews and Carolyn Fellman.  Learn more here!

Chip Fisher Memorial Exhibition

The Chip Fisher Memorial Exhibition is held in conjunction with the annual Joint Effort Safe Streets Program. On view in the Arts Council of Princeton’s second-level Solley Lobby Gallery, the exhibition features the paintings of Aaron Fisher and collages by Tracey Hill.

A reception will be held on Wednesday, August 7 at 5:30pm.

 

Paintings from the Garden State

The Arts Council of Princeton presents an exhibition of landscape paintings created by students in classes offered by the Arts Council and Readington Parks and Recreation and instructed by artist Charles David Viera.


Paintings from the Garden State  will be on display in the lower-level gallery from September 7 – 28, with an Opening Reception on September 7 from 1-3pm, coinciding with the ACP Fall Open House.

“The landscape of NJ, from the beautiful shoreline to the spacious farmlands, has been a wonderful inspiration to artists and is often overlooked when the conversation turns to the beauty of the northeast,” states Viera. “Working primarily from vistas in Hunterdon and Mercer Counties, the artwork in this exhibition will remind us why New Jersey was dubbed the Garden State.”

[caption id="attachment_24856" align="aligncenter" width="1024"] Inez Bastido Kline[/caption] [caption id="attachment_24858" align="aligncenter" width="1024"] Anne Marie Coppola[/caption]

Wonder

Wonder (noun); a feeling of surprise mingled with admiration, caused by something beautiful, unexpected, unfamiliar, or inexplicable. “I stood in front of it, observing the intricacy of the work with the wonder of a child”.
“When one is invited into the house of Marilyn Keating, the studio of Eric Schultz, or the world created by The Oiseaux Sisters, wonder is the best word to describe how you feel. This September, the Arts Council of Princeton’s Taplin Gallery will feature work from these artists, filling the space with kites, figures composed of scrap metal parts, paper mache birds, wooden pull toys, and so many other one-of-a-kind elements. Like a kid in a toy store, you won’t be able to stop smiling, imagining how all of these items came into being.
Marilyn Keating from Gloucester, NJ, received her BFA in sculpture from Moore College of Art in Philadelphia, PA. Throughout the last 15 years, she has concentrated much of her energy on public art, outdoor art, and community projects and currently works as a Teaching Artist for the State of New Jersey. Though skilled in many materials, Marilyn is first and foremost a woodworker. She has been the recipient of three fellowships from the New Jersey State Council on the Arts . Marilyn has participated in numerous solo and group exhibitions and her work appears in many public and private collections. She is a 2007 recipient of The George and Helen Segal Foundation Award for New Jersey sculptors. This will be her first show in Princeton.

The Oiseaux Sisters, Susan Andrews and Carolyn Fellman, creates work that incorporates humor, movement, and metaphor.  Their mixed media materials include paper, tin, clay, cloth, carved and painted wood, and found objects. They have created a series of figurative, often biographical or mythological, figures that range from small to larger than life.
The Oiseauxs honor attics, outbuildings, and collections both random and methodical. To them, all is a story. All objects are in conversation with each other: sometimes the subject, sometimes the object, sometimes the verb. But always talking. They love to make their work and are always asking, ‘Are we there yet? What is the journey and what is the destination? What is truth and what is fiction? What is memory? What is desire?
Eric Schultz’s work is a combination of emotion, spirit, and often humor brought together through distinctive techniques and his own experiences with both life and art. Eric’s goal is to open people’s minds to the diverse function and meaning of the everyday objects we create by exploring the programmed response and emotional attachment people have to their things.
Eric says, ‘I strive for the individual pieces I use to relate to the meaning of the whole form, like a sentence in a story. Only then am I able to give life back to lost and forgotten objects from the recognizable – animals, people, vehicles – to the fantastic. It is important to show that trash and waste are a matter of perspective and my art is recycling in a broader and more beautiful sense’.
Each of these artist’s work will fill the viewer with a sense of awe and delight. With summer ending and children heading back to school to ‘get serious’ again, be sure to stop by our gallery, prolong summer and renew your sense of wonder.”

-Maria Evans
Curator/Artistic Director

 

Sunday, September 8

Paintings from the Garden State

The Arts Council of Princeton presents an exhibition of landscape paintings created by students in classes offered by the Arts Council and Readington Parks and Recreation and instructed by artist Charles David Viera.


Paintings from the Garden State  will be on display in the lower-level gallery from September 7 – 28, with an Opening Reception on September 7 from 1-3pm, coinciding with the ACP Fall Open House.

“The landscape of NJ, from the beautiful shoreline to the spacious farmlands, has been a wonderful inspiration to artists and is often overlooked when the conversation turns to the beauty of the northeast,” states Viera. “Working primarily from vistas in Hunterdon and Mercer Counties, the artwork in this exhibition will remind us why New Jersey was dubbed the Garden State.”

[caption id="attachment_24856" align="aligncenter" width="1024"] Inez Bastido Kline[/caption] [caption id="attachment_24858" align="aligncenter" width="1024"] Anne Marie Coppola[/caption]

Wonder

Wonder (noun); a feeling of surprise mingled with admiration, caused by something beautiful, unexpected, unfamiliar, or inexplicable. “I stood in front of it, observing the intricacy of the work with the wonder of a child”.
“When one is invited into the house of Marilyn Keating, the studio of Eric Schultz, or the world created by The Oiseaux Sisters, wonder is the best word to describe how you feel. This September, the Arts Council of Princeton’s Taplin Gallery will feature work from these artists, filling the space with kites, figures composed of scrap metal parts, paper mache birds, wooden pull toys, and so many other one-of-a-kind elements. Like a kid in a toy store, you won’t be able to stop smiling, imagining how all of these items came into being.
Marilyn Keating from Gloucester, NJ, received her BFA in sculpture from Moore College of Art in Philadelphia, PA. Throughout the last 15 years, she has concentrated much of her energy on public art, outdoor art, and community projects and currently works as a Teaching Artist for the State of New Jersey. Though skilled in many materials, Marilyn is first and foremost a woodworker. She has been the recipient of three fellowships from the New Jersey State Council on the Arts . Marilyn has participated in numerous solo and group exhibitions and her work appears in many public and private collections. She is a 2007 recipient of The George and Helen Segal Foundation Award for New Jersey sculptors. This will be her first show in Princeton.

The Oiseaux Sisters, Susan Andrews and Carolyn Fellman, creates work that incorporates humor, movement, and metaphor.  Their mixed media materials include paper, tin, clay, cloth, carved and painted wood, and found objects. They have created a series of figurative, often biographical or mythological, figures that range from small to larger than life.
The Oiseauxs honor attics, outbuildings, and collections both random and methodical. To them, all is a story. All objects are in conversation with each other: sometimes the subject, sometimes the object, sometimes the verb. But always talking. They love to make their work and are always asking, ‘Are we there yet? What is the journey and what is the destination? What is truth and what is fiction? What is memory? What is desire?
Eric Schultz’s work is a combination of emotion, spirit, and often humor brought together through distinctive techniques and his own experiences with both life and art. Eric’s goal is to open people’s minds to the diverse function and meaning of the everyday objects we create by exploring the programmed response and emotional attachment people have to their things.
Eric says, ‘I strive for the individual pieces I use to relate to the meaning of the whole form, like a sentence in a story. Only then am I able to give life back to lost and forgotten objects from the recognizable – animals, people, vehicles – to the fantastic. It is important to show that trash and waste are a matter of perspective and my art is recycling in a broader and more beautiful sense’.
Each of these artist’s work will fill the viewer with a sense of awe and delight. With summer ending and children heading back to school to ‘get serious’ again, be sure to stop by our gallery, prolong summer and renew your sense of wonder.”

-Maria Evans
Curator/Artistic Director

 

Monday, September 9

Paintings from the Garden State

The Arts Council of Princeton presents an exhibition of landscape paintings created by students in classes offered by the Arts Council and Readington Parks and Recreation and instructed by artist Charles David Viera.


Paintings from the Garden State  will be on display in the lower-level gallery from September 7 – 28, with an Opening Reception on September 7 from 1-3pm, coinciding with the ACP Fall Open House.

“The landscape of NJ, from the beautiful shoreline to the spacious farmlands, has been a wonderful inspiration to artists and is often overlooked when the conversation turns to the beauty of the northeast,” states Viera. “Working primarily from vistas in Hunterdon and Mercer Counties, the artwork in this exhibition will remind us why New Jersey was dubbed the Garden State.”

[caption id="attachment_24856" align="aligncenter" width="1024"] Inez Bastido Kline[/caption] [caption id="attachment_24858" align="aligncenter" width="1024"] Anne Marie Coppola[/caption]

Wonder

Wonder (noun); a feeling of surprise mingled with admiration, caused by something beautiful, unexpected, unfamiliar, or inexplicable. “I stood in front of it, observing the intricacy of the work with the wonder of a child”.
“When one is invited into the house of Marilyn Keating, the studio of Eric Schultz, or the world created by The Oiseaux Sisters, wonder is the best word to describe how you feel. This September, the Arts Council of Princeton’s Taplin Gallery will feature work from these artists, filling the space with kites, figures composed of scrap metal parts, paper mache birds, wooden pull toys, and so many other one-of-a-kind elements. Like a kid in a toy store, you won’t be able to stop smiling, imagining how all of these items came into being.
Marilyn Keating from Gloucester, NJ, received her BFA in sculpture from Moore College of Art in Philadelphia, PA. Throughout the last 15 years, she has concentrated much of her energy on public art, outdoor art, and community projects and currently works as a Teaching Artist for the State of New Jersey. Though skilled in many materials, Marilyn is first and foremost a woodworker. She has been the recipient of three fellowships from the New Jersey State Council on the Arts . Marilyn has participated in numerous solo and group exhibitions and her work appears in many public and private collections. She is a 2007 recipient of The George and Helen Segal Foundation Award for New Jersey sculptors. This will be her first show in Princeton.

The Oiseaux Sisters, Susan Andrews and Carolyn Fellman, creates work that incorporates humor, movement, and metaphor.  Their mixed media materials include paper, tin, clay, cloth, carved and painted wood, and found objects. They have created a series of figurative, often biographical or mythological, figures that range from small to larger than life.
The Oiseauxs honor attics, outbuildings, and collections both random and methodical. To them, all is a story. All objects are in conversation with each other: sometimes the subject, sometimes the object, sometimes the verb. But always talking. They love to make their work and are always asking, ‘Are we there yet? What is the journey and what is the destination? What is truth and what is fiction? What is memory? What is desire?
Eric Schultz’s work is a combination of emotion, spirit, and often humor brought together through distinctive techniques and his own experiences with both life and art. Eric’s goal is to open people’s minds to the diverse function and meaning of the everyday objects we create by exploring the programmed response and emotional attachment people have to their things.
Eric says, ‘I strive for the individual pieces I use to relate to the meaning of the whole form, like a sentence in a story. Only then am I able to give life back to lost and forgotten objects from the recognizable – animals, people, vehicles – to the fantastic. It is important to show that trash and waste are a matter of perspective and my art is recycling in a broader and more beautiful sense’.
Each of these artist’s work will fill the viewer with a sense of awe and delight. With summer ending and children heading back to school to ‘get serious’ again, be sure to stop by our gallery, prolong summer and renew your sense of wonder.”

-Maria Evans
Curator/Artistic Director

 

Tuesday, September 10

Paintings from the Garden State

The Arts Council of Princeton presents an exhibition of landscape paintings created by students in classes offered by the Arts Council and Readington Parks and Recreation and instructed by artist Charles David Viera.


Paintings from the Garden State  will be on display in the lower-level gallery from September 7 – 28, with an Opening Reception on September 7 from 1-3pm, coinciding with the ACP Fall Open House.

“The landscape of NJ, from the beautiful shoreline to the spacious farmlands, has been a wonderful inspiration to artists and is often overlooked when the conversation turns to the beauty of the northeast,” states Viera. “Working primarily from vistas in Hunterdon and Mercer Counties, the artwork in this exhibition will remind us why New Jersey was dubbed the Garden State.”

[caption id="attachment_24856" align="aligncenter" width="1024"] Inez Bastido Kline[/caption] [caption id="attachment_24858" align="aligncenter" width="1024"] Anne Marie Coppola[/caption]

Power of Faces

Images from the global photojournalism project by Theresa Menders and Daniel Farber Huang will be on display on the second floor of the library through November 30. Realizing that most of the nearly 69 million people displaced to refugee camps lost treasured family photos when they fled their homes, Menders and Huang bring photo printers into refugee camps around the globe, where they distribute portraits for individuals to keep. The context of refugee camps is intentionally cropped out of the images to focus on individuals, and not merely their label as “refugees”.  This photojournalism project humanizes the plight of refugees and illuminates their experiences.

 

[caption id="attachment_24854" align="aligncenter" width="1024"] Power of Faces – Greece, 2017[/caption]

Wonder

Wonder (noun); a feeling of surprise mingled with admiration, caused by something beautiful, unexpected, unfamiliar, or inexplicable. “I stood in front of it, observing the intricacy of the work with the wonder of a child”.
“When one is invited into the house of Marilyn Keating, the studio of Eric Schultz, or the world created by The Oiseaux Sisters, wonder is the best word to describe how you feel. This September, the Arts Council of Princeton’s Taplin Gallery will feature work from these artists, filling the space with kites, figures composed of scrap metal parts, paper mache birds, wooden pull toys, and so many other one-of-a-kind elements. Like a kid in a toy store, you won’t be able to stop smiling, imagining how all of these items came into being.
Marilyn Keating from Gloucester, NJ, received her BFA in sculpture from Moore College of Art in Philadelphia, PA. Throughout the last 15 years, she has concentrated much of her energy on public art, outdoor art, and community projects and currently works as a Teaching Artist for the State of New Jersey. Though skilled in many materials, Marilyn is first and foremost a woodworker. She has been the recipient of three fellowships from the New Jersey State Council on the Arts . Marilyn has participated in numerous solo and group exhibitions and her work appears in many public and private collections. She is a 2007 recipient of The George and Helen Segal Foundation Award for New Jersey sculptors. This will be her first show in Princeton.

The Oiseaux Sisters, Susan Andrews and Carolyn Fellman, creates work that incorporates humor, movement, and metaphor.  Their mixed media materials include paper, tin, clay, cloth, carved and painted wood, and found objects. They have created a series of figurative, often biographical or mythological, figures that range from small to larger than life.
The Oiseauxs honor attics, outbuildings, and collections both random and methodical. To them, all is a story. All objects are in conversation with each other: sometimes the subject, sometimes the object, sometimes the verb. But always talking. They love to make their work and are always asking, ‘Are we there yet? What is the journey and what is the destination? What is truth and what is fiction? What is memory? What is desire?
Eric Schultz’s work is a combination of emotion, spirit, and often humor brought together through distinctive techniques and his own experiences with both life and art. Eric’s goal is to open people’s minds to the diverse function and meaning of the everyday objects we create by exploring the programmed response and emotional attachment people have to their things.
Eric says, ‘I strive for the individual pieces I use to relate to the meaning of the whole form, like a sentence in a story. Only then am I able to give life back to lost and forgotten objects from the recognizable – animals, people, vehicles – to the fantastic. It is important to show that trash and waste are a matter of perspective and my art is recycling in a broader and more beautiful sense’.
Each of these artist’s work will fill the viewer with a sense of awe and delight. With summer ending and children heading back to school to ‘get serious’ again, be sure to stop by our gallery, prolong summer and renew your sense of wonder.”

-Maria Evans
Curator/Artistic Director

 

Wednesday, September 11

Paintings from the Garden State

The Arts Council of Princeton presents an exhibition of landscape paintings created by students in classes offered by the Arts Council and Readington Parks and Recreation and instructed by artist Charles David Viera.


Paintings from the Garden State  will be on display in the lower-level gallery from September 7 – 28, with an Opening Reception on September 7 from 1-3pm, coinciding with the ACP Fall Open House.

“The landscape of NJ, from the beautiful shoreline to the spacious farmlands, has been a wonderful inspiration to artists and is often overlooked when the conversation turns to the beauty of the northeast,” states Viera. “Working primarily from vistas in Hunterdon and Mercer Counties, the artwork in this exhibition will remind us why New Jersey was dubbed the Garden State.”

[caption id="attachment_24856" align="aligncenter" width="1024"] Inez Bastido Kline[/caption] [caption id="attachment_24858" align="aligncenter" width="1024"] Anne Marie Coppola[/caption]

Power of Faces

Images from the global photojournalism project by Theresa Menders and Daniel Farber Huang will be on display on the second floor of the library through November 30. Realizing that most of the nearly 69 million people displaced to refugee camps lost treasured family photos when they fled their homes, Menders and Huang bring photo printers into refugee camps around the globe, where they distribute portraits for individuals to keep. The context of refugee camps is intentionally cropped out of the images to focus on individuals, and not merely their label as “refugees”.  This photojournalism project humanizes the plight of refugees and illuminates their experiences.

 

[caption id="attachment_24854" align="aligncenter" width="1024"] Power of Faces – Greece, 2017[/caption]

Wonder

Wonder (noun); a feeling of surprise mingled with admiration, caused by something beautiful, unexpected, unfamiliar, or inexplicable. “I stood in front of it, observing the intricacy of the work with the wonder of a child”.
“When one is invited into the house of Marilyn Keating, the studio of Eric Schultz, or the world created by The Oiseaux Sisters, wonder is the best word to describe how you feel. This September, the Arts Council of Princeton’s Taplin Gallery will feature work from these artists, filling the space with kites, figures composed of scrap metal parts, paper mache birds, wooden pull toys, and so many other one-of-a-kind elements. Like a kid in a toy store, you won’t be able to stop smiling, imagining how all of these items came into being.
Marilyn Keating from Gloucester, NJ, received her BFA in sculpture from Moore College of Art in Philadelphia, PA. Throughout the last 15 years, she has concentrated much of her energy on public art, outdoor art, and community projects and currently works as a Teaching Artist for the State of New Jersey. Though skilled in many materials, Marilyn is first and foremost a woodworker. She has been the recipient of three fellowships from the New Jersey State Council on the Arts . Marilyn has participated in numerous solo and group exhibitions and her work appears in many public and private collections. She is a 2007 recipient of The George and Helen Segal Foundation Award for New Jersey sculptors. This will be her first show in Princeton.

The Oiseaux Sisters, Susan Andrews and Carolyn Fellman, creates work that incorporates humor, movement, and metaphor.  Their mixed media materials include paper, tin, clay, cloth, carved and painted wood, and found objects. They have created a series of figurative, often biographical or mythological, figures that range from small to larger than life.
The Oiseauxs honor attics, outbuildings, and collections both random and methodical. To them, all is a story. All objects are in conversation with each other: sometimes the subject, sometimes the object, sometimes the verb. But always talking. They love to make their work and are always asking, ‘Are we there yet? What is the journey and what is the destination? What is truth and what is fiction? What is memory? What is desire?
Eric Schultz’s work is a combination of emotion, spirit, and often humor brought together through distinctive techniques and his own experiences with both life and art. Eric’s goal is to open people’s minds to the diverse function and meaning of the everyday objects we create by exploring the programmed response and emotional attachment people have to their things.
Eric says, ‘I strive for the individual pieces I use to relate to the meaning of the whole form, like a sentence in a story. Only then am I able to give life back to lost and forgotten objects from the recognizable – animals, people, vehicles – to the fantastic. It is important to show that trash and waste are a matter of perspective and my art is recycling in a broader and more beautiful sense’.
Each of these artist’s work will fill the viewer with a sense of awe and delight. With summer ending and children heading back to school to ‘get serious’ again, be sure to stop by our gallery, prolong summer and renew your sense of wonder.”

-Maria Evans
Curator/Artistic Director