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Thursday, September 19

Paintings from the Garden State

The Arts Council of Princeton presents an exhibition of landscape paintings created by students in classes offered by the Arts Council and Readington Parks and Recreation and instructed by artist Charles David Viera.


Paintings from the Garden State  will be on display in the lower-level gallery from September 7 – 28, with an Opening Reception on September 7 from 1-3pm, coinciding with the ACP Fall Open House.

“The landscape of NJ, from the beautiful shoreline to the spacious farmlands, has been a wonderful inspiration to artists and is often overlooked when the conversation turns to the beauty of the northeast,” states Viera. “Working primarily from vistas in Hunterdon and Mercer Counties, the artwork in this exhibition will remind us why New Jersey was dubbed the Garden State.”

[caption id="attachment_24856" align="aligncenter" width="1024"] Inez Bastido Kline[/caption] [caption id="attachment_24858" align="aligncenter" width="1024"] Anne Marie Coppola[/caption]

Power of Faces

Images from the global photojournalism project by Theresa Menders and Daniel Farber Huang will be on display on the second floor of the library through November 30. Realizing that most of the nearly 69 million people displaced to refugee camps lost treasured family photos when they fled their homes, Menders and Huang bring photo printers into refugee camps around the globe, where they distribute portraits for individuals to keep. The context of refugee camps is intentionally cropped out of the images to focus on individuals, and not merely their label as “refugees”.  This photojournalism project humanizes the plight of refugees and illuminates their experiences.

 

[caption id="attachment_24854" align="aligncenter" width="1024"] Power of Faces – Greece, 2017[/caption]

Wonder

Wonder (noun); a feeling of surprise mingled with admiration, caused by something beautiful, unexpected, unfamiliar, or inexplicable. “I stood in front of it, observing the intricacy of the work with the wonder of a child”.
“When one is invited into the house of Marilyn Keating, the studio of Eric Schultz, or the world created by The Oiseaux Sisters, wonder is the best word to describe how you feel. This September, the Arts Council of Princeton’s Taplin Gallery will feature work from these artists, filling the space with kites, figures composed of scrap metal parts, paper mache birds, wooden pull toys, and so many other one-of-a-kind elements. Like a kid in a toy store, you won’t be able to stop smiling, imagining how all of these items came into being.
Marilyn Keating from Gloucester, NJ, received her BFA in sculpture from Moore College of Art in Philadelphia, PA. Throughout the last 15 years, she has concentrated much of her energy on public art, outdoor art, and community projects and currently works as a Teaching Artist for the State of New Jersey. Though skilled in many materials, Marilyn is first and foremost a woodworker. She has been the recipient of three fellowships from the New Jersey State Council on the Arts . Marilyn has participated in numerous solo and group exhibitions and her work appears in many public and private collections. She is a 2007 recipient of The George and Helen Segal Foundation Award for New Jersey sculptors. This will be her first show in Princeton.

The Oiseaux Sisters, Susan Andrews and Carolyn Fellman, creates work that incorporates humor, movement, and metaphor.  Their mixed media materials include paper, tin, clay, cloth, carved and painted wood, and found objects. They have created a series of figurative, often biographical or mythological, figures that range from small to larger than life.
The Oiseauxs honor attics, outbuildings, and collections both random and methodical. To them, all is a story. All objects are in conversation with each other: sometimes the subject, sometimes the object, sometimes the verb. But always talking. They love to make their work and are always asking, ‘Are we there yet? What is the journey and what is the destination? What is truth and what is fiction? What is memory? What is desire?
Eric Schultz’s work is a combination of emotion, spirit, and often humor brought together through distinctive techniques and his own experiences with both life and art. Eric’s goal is to open people’s minds to the diverse function and meaning of the everyday objects we create by exploring the programmed response and emotional attachment people have to their things.
Eric says, ‘I strive for the individual pieces I use to relate to the meaning of the whole form, like a sentence in a story. Only then am I able to give life back to lost and forgotten objects from the recognizable – animals, people, vehicles – to the fantastic. It is important to show that trash and waste are a matter of perspective and my art is recycling in a broader and more beautiful sense’.
Each of these artist’s work will fill the viewer with a sense of awe and delight. With summer ending and children heading back to school to ‘get serious’ again, be sure to stop by our gallery, prolong summer and renew your sense of wonder.”

-Maria Evans
Curator/Artistic Director

 

Friday, September 20

Paintings from the Garden State

The Arts Council of Princeton presents an exhibition of landscape paintings created by students in classes offered by the Arts Council and Readington Parks and Recreation and instructed by artist Charles David Viera.


Paintings from the Garden State  will be on display in the lower-level gallery from September 7 – 28, with an Opening Reception on September 7 from 1-3pm, coinciding with the ACP Fall Open House.

“The landscape of NJ, from the beautiful shoreline to the spacious farmlands, has been a wonderful inspiration to artists and is often overlooked when the conversation turns to the beauty of the northeast,” states Viera. “Working primarily from vistas in Hunterdon and Mercer Counties, the artwork in this exhibition will remind us why New Jersey was dubbed the Garden State.”

[caption id="attachment_24856" align="aligncenter" width="1024"] Inez Bastido Kline[/caption] [caption id="attachment_24858" align="aligncenter" width="1024"] Anne Marie Coppola[/caption]

Power of Faces

Images from the global photojournalism project by Theresa Menders and Daniel Farber Huang will be on display on the second floor of the library through November 30. Realizing that most of the nearly 69 million people displaced to refugee camps lost treasured family photos when they fled their homes, Menders and Huang bring photo printers into refugee camps around the globe, where they distribute portraits for individuals to keep. The context of refugee camps is intentionally cropped out of the images to focus on individuals, and not merely their label as “refugees”.  This photojournalism project humanizes the plight of refugees and illuminates their experiences.

 

[caption id="attachment_24854" align="aligncenter" width="1024"] Power of Faces – Greece, 2017[/caption]

Wonder

Wonder (noun); a feeling of surprise mingled with admiration, caused by something beautiful, unexpected, unfamiliar, or inexplicable. “I stood in front of it, observing the intricacy of the work with the wonder of a child”.
“When one is invited into the house of Marilyn Keating, the studio of Eric Schultz, or the world created by The Oiseaux Sisters, wonder is the best word to describe how you feel. This September, the Arts Council of Princeton’s Taplin Gallery will feature work from these artists, filling the space with kites, figures composed of scrap metal parts, paper mache birds, wooden pull toys, and so many other one-of-a-kind elements. Like a kid in a toy store, you won’t be able to stop smiling, imagining how all of these items came into being.
Marilyn Keating from Gloucester, NJ, received her BFA in sculpture from Moore College of Art in Philadelphia, PA. Throughout the last 15 years, she has concentrated much of her energy on public art, outdoor art, and community projects and currently works as a Teaching Artist for the State of New Jersey. Though skilled in many materials, Marilyn is first and foremost a woodworker. She has been the recipient of three fellowships from the New Jersey State Council on the Arts . Marilyn has participated in numerous solo and group exhibitions and her work appears in many public and private collections. She is a 2007 recipient of The George and Helen Segal Foundation Award for New Jersey sculptors. This will be her first show in Princeton.

The Oiseaux Sisters, Susan Andrews and Carolyn Fellman, creates work that incorporates humor, movement, and metaphor.  Their mixed media materials include paper, tin, clay, cloth, carved and painted wood, and found objects. They have created a series of figurative, often biographical or mythological, figures that range from small to larger than life.
The Oiseauxs honor attics, outbuildings, and collections both random and methodical. To them, all is a story. All objects are in conversation with each other: sometimes the subject, sometimes the object, sometimes the verb. But always talking. They love to make their work and are always asking, ‘Are we there yet? What is the journey and what is the destination? What is truth and what is fiction? What is memory? What is desire?
Eric Schultz’s work is a combination of emotion, spirit, and often humor brought together through distinctive techniques and his own experiences with both life and art. Eric’s goal is to open people’s minds to the diverse function and meaning of the everyday objects we create by exploring the programmed response and emotional attachment people have to their things.
Eric says, ‘I strive for the individual pieces I use to relate to the meaning of the whole form, like a sentence in a story. Only then am I able to give life back to lost and forgotten objects from the recognizable – animals, people, vehicles – to the fantastic. It is important to show that trash and waste are a matter of perspective and my art is recycling in a broader and more beautiful sense’.
Each of these artist’s work will fill the viewer with a sense of awe and delight. With summer ending and children heading back to school to ‘get serious’ again, be sure to stop by our gallery, prolong summer and renew your sense of wonder.”

-Maria Evans
Curator/Artistic Director

 

Saturday, September 21

An Evening with Bollywood

- Free and Open to the Public!
[caption id="attachment_24902" align="alignnone" width="1024"] Uma Kapoor’s NachNation Dance Group will take the stage![/caption]

Join the Arts Council of Princeton for a community event celebrating Bollywood culture! Enjoy live dance performances by Uma Kapoor’s award-winning NachNation Dance Team, Mehndi henna tattoos,  vendors, and folk arts and crafts. Contribute to a collaborative Bollywood-inspired mural and drop-in for a free yoga workshop with the Integral Yoga Community Center! The evening concludes with a Bollywood Dance Party with DJ Atresh.

This event is free and open to the public. Free, ample parking is available at the Princeton Shopping Center.

Paintings from the Garden State

The Arts Council of Princeton presents an exhibition of landscape paintings created by students in classes offered by the Arts Council and Readington Parks and Recreation and instructed by artist Charles David Viera.


Paintings from the Garden State  will be on display in the lower-level gallery from September 7 – 28, with an Opening Reception on September 7 from 1-3pm, coinciding with the ACP Fall Open House.

“The landscape of NJ, from the beautiful shoreline to the spacious farmlands, has been a wonderful inspiration to artists and is often overlooked when the conversation turns to the beauty of the northeast,” states Viera. “Working primarily from vistas in Hunterdon and Mercer Counties, the artwork in this exhibition will remind us why New Jersey was dubbed the Garden State.”

[caption id="attachment_24856" align="aligncenter" width="1024"] Inez Bastido Kline[/caption] [caption id="attachment_24858" align="aligncenter" width="1024"] Anne Marie Coppola[/caption]

Power of Faces

Images from the global photojournalism project by Theresa Menders and Daniel Farber Huang will be on display on the second floor of the library through November 30. Realizing that most of the nearly 69 million people displaced to refugee camps lost treasured family photos when they fled their homes, Menders and Huang bring photo printers into refugee camps around the globe, where they distribute portraits for individuals to keep. The context of refugee camps is intentionally cropped out of the images to focus on individuals, and not merely their label as “refugees”.  This photojournalism project humanizes the plight of refugees and illuminates their experiences.

 

[caption id="attachment_24854" align="aligncenter" width="1024"] Power of Faces – Greece, 2017[/caption]

Wonder

Wonder (noun); a feeling of surprise mingled with admiration, caused by something beautiful, unexpected, unfamiliar, or inexplicable. “I stood in front of it, observing the intricacy of the work with the wonder of a child”.
“When one is invited into the house of Marilyn Keating, the studio of Eric Schultz, or the world created by The Oiseaux Sisters, wonder is the best word to describe how you feel. This September, the Arts Council of Princeton’s Taplin Gallery will feature work from these artists, filling the space with kites, figures composed of scrap metal parts, paper mache birds, wooden pull toys, and so many other one-of-a-kind elements. Like a kid in a toy store, you won’t be able to stop smiling, imagining how all of these items came into being.
Marilyn Keating from Gloucester, NJ, received her BFA in sculpture from Moore College of Art in Philadelphia, PA. Throughout the last 15 years, she has concentrated much of her energy on public art, outdoor art, and community projects and currently works as a Teaching Artist for the State of New Jersey. Though skilled in many materials, Marilyn is first and foremost a woodworker. She has been the recipient of three fellowships from the New Jersey State Council on the Arts . Marilyn has participated in numerous solo and group exhibitions and her work appears in many public and private collections. She is a 2007 recipient of The George and Helen Segal Foundation Award for New Jersey sculptors. This will be her first show in Princeton.

The Oiseaux Sisters, Susan Andrews and Carolyn Fellman, creates work that incorporates humor, movement, and metaphor.  Their mixed media materials include paper, tin, clay, cloth, carved and painted wood, and found objects. They have created a series of figurative, often biographical or mythological, figures that range from small to larger than life.
The Oiseauxs honor attics, outbuildings, and collections both random and methodical. To them, all is a story. All objects are in conversation with each other: sometimes the subject, sometimes the object, sometimes the verb. But always talking. They love to make their work and are always asking, ‘Are we there yet? What is the journey and what is the destination? What is truth and what is fiction? What is memory? What is desire?
Eric Schultz’s work is a combination of emotion, spirit, and often humor brought together through distinctive techniques and his own experiences with both life and art. Eric’s goal is to open people’s minds to the diverse function and meaning of the everyday objects we create by exploring the programmed response and emotional attachment people have to their things.
Eric says, ‘I strive for the individual pieces I use to relate to the meaning of the whole form, like a sentence in a story. Only then am I able to give life back to lost and forgotten objects from the recognizable – animals, people, vehicles – to the fantastic. It is important to show that trash and waste are a matter of perspective and my art is recycling in a broader and more beautiful sense’.
Each of these artist’s work will fill the viewer with a sense of awe and delight. With summer ending and children heading back to school to ‘get serious’ again, be sure to stop by our gallery, prolong summer and renew your sense of wonder.”

-Maria Evans
Curator/Artistic Director

 

Sunday, September 22

Paintings from the Garden State

The Arts Council of Princeton presents an exhibition of landscape paintings created by students in classes offered by the Arts Council and Readington Parks and Recreation and instructed by artist Charles David Viera.


Paintings from the Garden State  will be on display in the lower-level gallery from September 7 – 28, with an Opening Reception on September 7 from 1-3pm, coinciding with the ACP Fall Open House.

“The landscape of NJ, from the beautiful shoreline to the spacious farmlands, has been a wonderful inspiration to artists and is often overlooked when the conversation turns to the beauty of the northeast,” states Viera. “Working primarily from vistas in Hunterdon and Mercer Counties, the artwork in this exhibition will remind us why New Jersey was dubbed the Garden State.”

[caption id="attachment_24856" align="aligncenter" width="1024"] Inez Bastido Kline[/caption] [caption id="attachment_24858" align="aligncenter" width="1024"] Anne Marie Coppola[/caption]

Power of Faces

Images from the global photojournalism project by Theresa Menders and Daniel Farber Huang will be on display on the second floor of the library through November 30. Realizing that most of the nearly 69 million people displaced to refugee camps lost treasured family photos when they fled their homes, Menders and Huang bring photo printers into refugee camps around the globe, where they distribute portraits for individuals to keep. The context of refugee camps is intentionally cropped out of the images to focus on individuals, and not merely their label as “refugees”.  This photojournalism project humanizes the plight of refugees and illuminates their experiences.

 

[caption id="attachment_24854" align="aligncenter" width="1024"] Power of Faces – Greece, 2017[/caption]

Wonder

Wonder (noun); a feeling of surprise mingled with admiration, caused by something beautiful, unexpected, unfamiliar, or inexplicable. “I stood in front of it, observing the intricacy of the work with the wonder of a child”.
“When one is invited into the house of Marilyn Keating, the studio of Eric Schultz, or the world created by The Oiseaux Sisters, wonder is the best word to describe how you feel. This September, the Arts Council of Princeton’s Taplin Gallery will feature work from these artists, filling the space with kites, figures composed of scrap metal parts, paper mache birds, wooden pull toys, and so many other one-of-a-kind elements. Like a kid in a toy store, you won’t be able to stop smiling, imagining how all of these items came into being.
Marilyn Keating from Gloucester, NJ, received her BFA in sculpture from Moore College of Art in Philadelphia, PA. Throughout the last 15 years, she has concentrated much of her energy on public art, outdoor art, and community projects and currently works as a Teaching Artist for the State of New Jersey. Though skilled in many materials, Marilyn is first and foremost a woodworker. She has been the recipient of three fellowships from the New Jersey State Council on the Arts . Marilyn has participated in numerous solo and group exhibitions and her work appears in many public and private collections. She is a 2007 recipient of The George and Helen Segal Foundation Award for New Jersey sculptors. This will be her first show in Princeton.

The Oiseaux Sisters, Susan Andrews and Carolyn Fellman, creates work that incorporates humor, movement, and metaphor.  Their mixed media materials include paper, tin, clay, cloth, carved and painted wood, and found objects. They have created a series of figurative, often biographical or mythological, figures that range from small to larger than life.
The Oiseauxs honor attics, outbuildings, and collections both random and methodical. To them, all is a story. All objects are in conversation with each other: sometimes the subject, sometimes the object, sometimes the verb. But always talking. They love to make their work and are always asking, ‘Are we there yet? What is the journey and what is the destination? What is truth and what is fiction? What is memory? What is desire?
Eric Schultz’s work is a combination of emotion, spirit, and often humor brought together through distinctive techniques and his own experiences with both life and art. Eric’s goal is to open people’s minds to the diverse function and meaning of the everyday objects we create by exploring the programmed response and emotional attachment people have to their things.
Eric says, ‘I strive for the individual pieces I use to relate to the meaning of the whole form, like a sentence in a story. Only then am I able to give life back to lost and forgotten objects from the recognizable – animals, people, vehicles – to the fantastic. It is important to show that trash and waste are a matter of perspective and my art is recycling in a broader and more beautiful sense’.
Each of these artist’s work will fill the viewer with a sense of awe and delight. With summer ending and children heading back to school to ‘get serious’ again, be sure to stop by our gallery, prolong summer and renew your sense of wonder.”

-Maria Evans
Curator/Artistic Director

 

Monday, September 23

Paintings from the Garden State

The Arts Council of Princeton presents an exhibition of landscape paintings created by students in classes offered by the Arts Council and Readington Parks and Recreation and instructed by artist Charles David Viera.


Paintings from the Garden State  will be on display in the lower-level gallery from September 7 – 28, with an Opening Reception on September 7 from 1-3pm, coinciding with the ACP Fall Open House.

“The landscape of NJ, from the beautiful shoreline to the spacious farmlands, has been a wonderful inspiration to artists and is often overlooked when the conversation turns to the beauty of the northeast,” states Viera. “Working primarily from vistas in Hunterdon and Mercer Counties, the artwork in this exhibition will remind us why New Jersey was dubbed the Garden State.”

[caption id="attachment_24856" align="aligncenter" width="1024"] Inez Bastido Kline[/caption] [caption id="attachment_24858" align="aligncenter" width="1024"] Anne Marie Coppola[/caption]

Power of Faces

Images from the global photojournalism project by Theresa Menders and Daniel Farber Huang will be on display on the second floor of the library through November 30. Realizing that most of the nearly 69 million people displaced to refugee camps lost treasured family photos when they fled their homes, Menders and Huang bring photo printers into refugee camps around the globe, where they distribute portraits for individuals to keep. The context of refugee camps is intentionally cropped out of the images to focus on individuals, and not merely their label as “refugees”.  This photojournalism project humanizes the plight of refugees and illuminates their experiences.

 

[caption id="attachment_24854" align="aligncenter" width="1024"] Power of Faces – Greece, 2017[/caption]

Wonder

Wonder (noun); a feeling of surprise mingled with admiration, caused by something beautiful, unexpected, unfamiliar, or inexplicable. “I stood in front of it, observing the intricacy of the work with the wonder of a child”.
“When one is invited into the house of Marilyn Keating, the studio of Eric Schultz, or the world created by The Oiseaux Sisters, wonder is the best word to describe how you feel. This September, the Arts Council of Princeton’s Taplin Gallery will feature work from these artists, filling the space with kites, figures composed of scrap metal parts, paper mache birds, wooden pull toys, and so many other one-of-a-kind elements. Like a kid in a toy store, you won’t be able to stop smiling, imagining how all of these items came into being.
Marilyn Keating from Gloucester, NJ, received her BFA in sculpture from Moore College of Art in Philadelphia, PA. Throughout the last 15 years, she has concentrated much of her energy on public art, outdoor art, and community projects and currently works as a Teaching Artist for the State of New Jersey. Though skilled in many materials, Marilyn is first and foremost a woodworker. She has been the recipient of three fellowships from the New Jersey State Council on the Arts . Marilyn has participated in numerous solo and group exhibitions and her work appears in many public and private collections. She is a 2007 recipient of The George and Helen Segal Foundation Award for New Jersey sculptors. This will be her first show in Princeton.

The Oiseaux Sisters, Susan Andrews and Carolyn Fellman, creates work that incorporates humor, movement, and metaphor.  Their mixed media materials include paper, tin, clay, cloth, carved and painted wood, and found objects. They have created a series of figurative, often biographical or mythological, figures that range from small to larger than life.
The Oiseauxs honor attics, outbuildings, and collections both random and methodical. To them, all is a story. All objects are in conversation with each other: sometimes the subject, sometimes the object, sometimes the verb. But always talking. They love to make their work and are always asking, ‘Are we there yet? What is the journey and what is the destination? What is truth and what is fiction? What is memory? What is desire?
Eric Schultz’s work is a combination of emotion, spirit, and often humor brought together through distinctive techniques and his own experiences with both life and art. Eric’s goal is to open people’s minds to the diverse function and meaning of the everyday objects we create by exploring the programmed response and emotional attachment people have to their things.
Eric says, ‘I strive for the individual pieces I use to relate to the meaning of the whole form, like a sentence in a story. Only then am I able to give life back to lost and forgotten objects from the recognizable – animals, people, vehicles – to the fantastic. It is important to show that trash and waste are a matter of perspective and my art is recycling in a broader and more beautiful sense’.
Each of these artist’s work will fill the viewer with a sense of awe and delight. With summer ending and children heading back to school to ‘get serious’ again, be sure to stop by our gallery, prolong summer and renew your sense of wonder.”

-Maria Evans
Curator/Artistic Director

 

Tuesday, September 24

Paintings from the Garden State

The Arts Council of Princeton presents an exhibition of landscape paintings created by students in classes offered by the Arts Council and Readington Parks and Recreation and instructed by artist Charles David Viera.


Paintings from the Garden State  will be on display in the lower-level gallery from September 7 – 28, with an Opening Reception on September 7 from 1-3pm, coinciding with the ACP Fall Open House.

“The landscape of NJ, from the beautiful shoreline to the spacious farmlands, has been a wonderful inspiration to artists and is often overlooked when the conversation turns to the beauty of the northeast,” states Viera. “Working primarily from vistas in Hunterdon and Mercer Counties, the artwork in this exhibition will remind us why New Jersey was dubbed the Garden State.”

[caption id="attachment_24856" align="aligncenter" width="1024"] Inez Bastido Kline[/caption] [caption id="attachment_24858" align="aligncenter" width="1024"] Anne Marie Coppola[/caption]

Power of Faces

Images from the global photojournalism project by Theresa Menders and Daniel Farber Huang will be on display on the second floor of the library through November 30. Realizing that most of the nearly 69 million people displaced to refugee camps lost treasured family photos when they fled their homes, Menders and Huang bring photo printers into refugee camps around the globe, where they distribute portraits for individuals to keep. The context of refugee camps is intentionally cropped out of the images to focus on individuals, and not merely their label as “refugees”.  This photojournalism project humanizes the plight of refugees and illuminates their experiences.

 

[caption id="attachment_24854" align="aligncenter" width="1024"] Power of Faces – Greece, 2017[/caption]

Wonder

Wonder (noun); a feeling of surprise mingled with admiration, caused by something beautiful, unexpected, unfamiliar, or inexplicable. “I stood in front of it, observing the intricacy of the work with the wonder of a child”.
“When one is invited into the house of Marilyn Keating, the studio of Eric Schultz, or the world created by The Oiseaux Sisters, wonder is the best word to describe how you feel. This September, the Arts Council of Princeton’s Taplin Gallery will feature work from these artists, filling the space with kites, figures composed of scrap metal parts, paper mache birds, wooden pull toys, and so many other one-of-a-kind elements. Like a kid in a toy store, you won’t be able to stop smiling, imagining how all of these items came into being.
Marilyn Keating from Gloucester, NJ, received her BFA in sculpture from Moore College of Art in Philadelphia, PA. Throughout the last 15 years, she has concentrated much of her energy on public art, outdoor art, and community projects and currently works as a Teaching Artist for the State of New Jersey. Though skilled in many materials, Marilyn is first and foremost a woodworker. She has been the recipient of three fellowships from the New Jersey State Council on the Arts . Marilyn has participated in numerous solo and group exhibitions and her work appears in many public and private collections. She is a 2007 recipient of The George and Helen Segal Foundation Award for New Jersey sculptors. This will be her first show in Princeton.

The Oiseaux Sisters, Susan Andrews and Carolyn Fellman, creates work that incorporates humor, movement, and metaphor.  Their mixed media materials include paper, tin, clay, cloth, carved and painted wood, and found objects. They have created a series of figurative, often biographical or mythological, figures that range from small to larger than life.
The Oiseauxs honor attics, outbuildings, and collections both random and methodical. To them, all is a story. All objects are in conversation with each other: sometimes the subject, sometimes the object, sometimes the verb. But always talking. They love to make their work and are always asking, ‘Are we there yet? What is the journey and what is the destination? What is truth and what is fiction? What is memory? What is desire?
Eric Schultz’s work is a combination of emotion, spirit, and often humor brought together through distinctive techniques and his own experiences with both life and art. Eric’s goal is to open people’s minds to the diverse function and meaning of the everyday objects we create by exploring the programmed response and emotional attachment people have to their things.
Eric says, ‘I strive for the individual pieces I use to relate to the meaning of the whole form, like a sentence in a story. Only then am I able to give life back to lost and forgotten objects from the recognizable – animals, people, vehicles – to the fantastic. It is important to show that trash and waste are a matter of perspective and my art is recycling in a broader and more beautiful sense’.
Each of these artist’s work will fill the viewer with a sense of awe and delight. With summer ending and children heading back to school to ‘get serious’ again, be sure to stop by our gallery, prolong summer and renew your sense of wonder.”

-Maria Evans
Curator/Artistic Director

 

Wednesday, September 25

Paintings from the Garden State

The Arts Council of Princeton presents an exhibition of landscape paintings created by students in classes offered by the Arts Council and Readington Parks and Recreation and instructed by artist Charles David Viera.


Paintings from the Garden State  will be on display in the lower-level gallery from September 7 – 28, with an Opening Reception on September 7 from 1-3pm, coinciding with the ACP Fall Open House.

“The landscape of NJ, from the beautiful shoreline to the spacious farmlands, has been a wonderful inspiration to artists and is often overlooked when the conversation turns to the beauty of the northeast,” states Viera. “Working primarily from vistas in Hunterdon and Mercer Counties, the artwork in this exhibition will remind us why New Jersey was dubbed the Garden State.”

[caption id="attachment_24856" align="aligncenter" width="1024"] Inez Bastido Kline[/caption] [caption id="attachment_24858" align="aligncenter" width="1024"] Anne Marie Coppola[/caption]

Power of Faces

Images from the global photojournalism project by Theresa Menders and Daniel Farber Huang will be on display on the second floor of the library through November 30. Realizing that most of the nearly 69 million people displaced to refugee camps lost treasured family photos when they fled their homes, Menders and Huang bring photo printers into refugee camps around the globe, where they distribute portraits for individuals to keep. The context of refugee camps is intentionally cropped out of the images to focus on individuals, and not merely their label as “refugees”.  This photojournalism project humanizes the plight of refugees and illuminates their experiences.

 

[caption id="attachment_24854" align="aligncenter" width="1024"] Power of Faces – Greece, 2017[/caption]

Wonder

Wonder (noun); a feeling of surprise mingled with admiration, caused by something beautiful, unexpected, unfamiliar, or inexplicable. “I stood in front of it, observing the intricacy of the work with the wonder of a child”.
“When one is invited into the house of Marilyn Keating, the studio of Eric Schultz, or the world created by The Oiseaux Sisters, wonder is the best word to describe how you feel. This September, the Arts Council of Princeton’s Taplin Gallery will feature work from these artists, filling the space with kites, figures composed of scrap metal parts, paper mache birds, wooden pull toys, and so many other one-of-a-kind elements. Like a kid in a toy store, you won’t be able to stop smiling, imagining how all of these items came into being.
Marilyn Keating from Gloucester, NJ, received her BFA in sculpture from Moore College of Art in Philadelphia, PA. Throughout the last 15 years, she has concentrated much of her energy on public art, outdoor art, and community projects and currently works as a Teaching Artist for the State of New Jersey. Though skilled in many materials, Marilyn is first and foremost a woodworker. She has been the recipient of three fellowships from the New Jersey State Council on the Arts . Marilyn has participated in numerous solo and group exhibitions and her work appears in many public and private collections. She is a 2007 recipient of The George and Helen Segal Foundation Award for New Jersey sculptors. This will be her first show in Princeton.

The Oiseaux Sisters, Susan Andrews and Carolyn Fellman, creates work that incorporates humor, movement, and metaphor.  Their mixed media materials include paper, tin, clay, cloth, carved and painted wood, and found objects. They have created a series of figurative, often biographical or mythological, figures that range from small to larger than life.
The Oiseauxs honor attics, outbuildings, and collections both random and methodical. To them, all is a story. All objects are in conversation with each other: sometimes the subject, sometimes the object, sometimes the verb. But always talking. They love to make their work and are always asking, ‘Are we there yet? What is the journey and what is the destination? What is truth and what is fiction? What is memory? What is desire?
Eric Schultz’s work is a combination of emotion, spirit, and often humor brought together through distinctive techniques and his own experiences with both life and art. Eric’s goal is to open people’s minds to the diverse function and meaning of the everyday objects we create by exploring the programmed response and emotional attachment people have to their things.
Eric says, ‘I strive for the individual pieces I use to relate to the meaning of the whole form, like a sentence in a story. Only then am I able to give life back to lost and forgotten objects from the recognizable – animals, people, vehicles – to the fantastic. It is important to show that trash and waste are a matter of perspective and my art is recycling in a broader and more beautiful sense’.
Each of these artist’s work will fill the viewer with a sense of awe and delight. With summer ending and children heading back to school to ‘get serious’ again, be sure to stop by our gallery, prolong summer and renew your sense of wonder.”

-Maria Evans
Curator/Artistic Director