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Tuesday, October 20

In Conversation with Adam Welch

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The Arts Council takes great pride in our diverse community of artists, authors, and creatives of all disciplines. In Conversation is a curated series of discussions designed to celebrate and connect those who make art and those who love art! Breaking down the barriers between artist and art-appreciator, In Conversation delves into inspiration, studio practice, and artistic aspirations.

 

Arts Council Executive Director and nationally-acclaimed ceramic artist Adam Welch will be in conversation with Timothy M. Andrews, art collector and major supporter of the Arts Council of Princeton’s Artist-in-Residence program.

[caption id="attachment_28200" align="aligncenter" width="350"] Free registration available now![/caption]

This program is free, but donations allow us to continue creating community arts programming for all to enjoy! Please consider making a gift: https://bit.ly/2xjd7qG

 

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ABOUT ADAM:
Adam Welch is the Executive Director for the Arts Council of Princeton. Adam is an artist, critic, and educator. Adam’s art is about making and decoration. His writing examines the artists and activities of contemporary art. As an educator, Adam encourages students to inquire and create, examine worldviews and to awaken their understanding of self and the world and the relationship between the two.

Adam has participated in thirty-seven solo or group exhibitions in the United States over the past ten years, including at the Arts Council of Princeton, MoMA PS1 and White Columns in NYC, and AIR Gallery in Brooklyn, with solo exhibitions at the Hunterdon Art Museum, Kean University, Princeton Day School, and Northwestern College, and several curated, group, and invitational exhibitions throughout the United States. His art has been featured in four books including “The Best of 500 Ceramics: Celebrating a Decade in Clay” and” 500 Ceramic Sculptures: Contemporary Practice”, “Singular Works”, in the NCECA Biennial (Tampa Museum of Art) catalogue and has been reviewed in “Ceramics Art” and “Perception”, the Korean magazine “Monthly Ceramic Art”, and featured in “Ceramics Monthly”. Additionally, in the last ten years he has published forty-eight scholarly essays, reviews and catalogue essays.

[caption id="attachment_28156" align="alignleft" width="400"] .[/caption]

ARTIST STATEMENT:
Before joining the team of the Arts Council of Princeton, Adam had worked at Greenwich House Pottery since 2003. In 2007, he was appointed Assistant Director and in 2010 appointed Director. In 2010, Adam was appointed lecturer at Princeton University where he continues to teach. Adam holds a MFA from Virginia Commonwealth and a BFA with a minor in Art Education from Northern Arizona University in Flagstaff, Arizona. He lives in Hightstown, New Jersey with his wife, Rachel, a fashion designer, and their two daughters.

My work is about bricks and how their making is a reflection on labor and art. The forming, design, documentation and intervention, explores history and material culture. Brick is an object of unlimited potential and yet it connotes little expectation – a mass-produced building block devoid of individuality. It is a thing and the thing in itself embodied with great social and cultural purpose. Brick has a long history in civilization, enduring physically longer than any building material. Its purpose and form has not changed in 7,000 years. Brick is beginning and end.

The work is performative labor. The making of brick and the subsequent constructions explore aesthetical and cultural value attached to labor and doing something for the sake of doing it. Distinct yet interrelated bodies of work emerge – repair, replace, bricked-up, and fetish. I replace the industrial with the handmade, repair with prosthetics, create theoretical constructions inspired by the Window Tax of 1696, paint bricks using the Martha Stewart Living collection, use ground up calcined animal bones, coat with gold and use them as kitsch.

This collection of objects reflect a changing view of objectivity and expression – in an effort to understand the brick, and myself, more fully.

Art and Music: Touching Sound

We hear music. But what does music look like? A picture is worth a thousand sounds. Art and music complement one another and form a connection. The stimuli from each strengthen the other. Artists find their inspiration from many sources.

 

The artists of Princeton Artists’ Alliance are collaborating with the musicians of Mobius Percussion in the exhibition Art and Music: Touching Sound. Inspired by the musicians’ performance of Paper Melodies (my music box music) composed by Jason Treuting of So Percussion, the visual artists have created paintings, drawings, and sculptures.

 

In this collaborative project, the artists have searched for their imagery through the original music. The musicians have the opportunity to see how visual artists interpret their work and likewise, artists have the opportunity to visually record the influence of musical sounds.

 

A recording of Paper Melodies will be playing in the gallery as visitors view the artwork. Standing before the art and listening to the musical score offers the viewer a richer sensory experience.

 

This exhibition will enhance the human experience between listening and seeing.

 

The artists have all created new works for this show. Art and Music: Touching Sound will reflect the varied interpretation and influence the same composition has for each artist. The viewer will experience their own connections with the visual sights and sounds.

 

Co-curated by Donna Payton and Kathleen Preziosi.

[caption id="attachment_26019" align="aligncenter" width="472"] Joy Kreves[/caption] [caption id="attachment_26016" align="aligncenter" width="474"] Donna Payton[/caption]

Wednesday, October 21

Art and Music: Touching Sound

We hear music. But what does music look like? A picture is worth a thousand sounds. Art and music complement one another and form a connection. The stimuli from each strengthen the other. Artists find their inspiration from many sources.

 

The artists of Princeton Artists’ Alliance are collaborating with the musicians of Mobius Percussion in the exhibition Art and Music: Touching Sound. Inspired by the musicians’ performance of Paper Melodies (my music box music) composed by Jason Treuting of So Percussion, the visual artists have created paintings, drawings, and sculptures.

 

In this collaborative project, the artists have searched for their imagery through the original music. The musicians have the opportunity to see how visual artists interpret their work and likewise, artists have the opportunity to visually record the influence of musical sounds.

 

A recording of Paper Melodies will be playing in the gallery as visitors view the artwork. Standing before the art and listening to the musical score offers the viewer a richer sensory experience.

 

This exhibition will enhance the human experience between listening and seeing.

 

The artists have all created new works for this show. Art and Music: Touching Sound will reflect the varied interpretation and influence the same composition has for each artist. The viewer will experience their own connections with the visual sights and sounds.

 

Co-curated by Donna Payton and Kathleen Preziosi.

[caption id="attachment_26019" align="aligncenter" width="472"] Joy Kreves[/caption] [caption id="attachment_26016" align="aligncenter" width="474"] Donna Payton[/caption]

Thursday, October 22

Life Drawing Open Studio (in-person)

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Open Drawing is back in session! Join us for an in-person monitored, non-instructional workshop in which artists can work at their own pace in the medium of their choice from a clothed live model in short and sustained poses.

This class will be conducted using social distancing, and the number of students will be capped each week. Masks and a temperature check are required to enter the building.

Register for a single session or the six week block.

Click here to register.

Virtual Life Drawing Open Studio

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Are you tired of drawing the people you live with? Looking to improve your figure drawing skills at a low cost? Join us for a weekly monitored, non-instructional workshop in which artists can work at their own pace in the medium of their choice from a clothed live model in short and sustained poses.

To gain access to the session each week, please pay by 5pm on Thursday. You will then be sent a Zoom meeting link by 6:00pm for the 6:30pm workshop start.

Each workshop is $11 to join.

Use this link to register and pay here: Pay Now

Tech Requirements: Wifi, a computer or other device with a built in camera, and a Zoom account. Students will receive a different email with a link for that week’s Zoom meeting by 6pm on the day of.

Registration: Need some help to register? It’s (usually) easy to register for classes online, but if you are having problems please email education@artscouncilofprinceton.org. If you would prefer to call, you can call the Education Department at (609) 269-4923 between 11am and 1pm.

Virtual Art-Making Session with the Princeton University Art Museum: Gestures and Expressions

- Free!

The Arts Council is partnering with the Princeton University Art Museum to provide free online art-making experiences. Weekly classes are taught by artist-instructor Barbara DiLorenzo over Zoom, so participants can join live from home. A variety of media and techniques will be explored, using materials readily available. Each week’s lesson features works from the Museum’s collections and is introduced by an Art Museum Student Tour Guide.

This live art-making class is inspired by the Xochipala figurines Seated adult and youth. Ceramic figurines from Xochipala, in the Mexican state of Guerrero, are renowned for their attention to anatomical detail and expressiveness. Precise renditions of human anatomy—including bone, muscle, and fat as well as the telltale signs of age—lead us to imagine that the figurines are portraits of specific individuals. Perhaps the greatest example of Xochipala figural art, this seated pair captures an engaged, animated conversation, brilliantly expressed through the careful posing of unadorned bodies. In this class we will consider the intimacy and emotive expressions of the Xochipala figurines as we draw group portraits capturing gestures, feelings, and relationships between people.

Free registration for the drawing class via Zoom here.   (When prompted, click to sign in as “attendee”.)

This event will include live closed captions in both English and Spanish. English captions are available directly in the Zoom toolbar by clicking the “CC” icon. To access Spanish-language captioning, open Streamtext, where you can select “Spanish” to see the live captioning.

Para acceder a los subtítulos en varios idiomas, ingrese al seminario web de Zoom durante un evento en vivo, luego abra un navegador web separado para visitar esta página donde puede seleccionar “español” o el idioma de su elección.

Materials List

  • These materials are suggested by the instructor but not required. Any pencil, eraser, and paper will work well.Paper: For the demonstrations, I use Discount School Supply White Sulphite Paper (12 x 18″, 50 lb.). My personal sketchbooks include Moleskine, Strathmore, and a variety of others that have different textures and thicknesses. Everyone has their own preference, so I recommend trying out different papers to see what you like!Factis Mechanical Eraser: This eraser is helpful for pulling graphite and bringing highlights back into your drawing. It can also be used similar to a pencil, making long strokes of white (erasing the graphite) that add texture to a drawing. Tombow MONO Zero Erasers: Round & Rectangular: I use the small, round eraser for the tiniest erasing details. It saves time to have such a small eraser on hand, and creates beautiful moments of light.

    Faber-Castell Drawing Pencils: Although you can purchase a set of pencils in varying grades, for the drawing demo I’ll be using 6B so that people can see the dark marks better. I am not a fan of anything in the H grade, as the graphite is too hard and light for me to sketch comfortably. I love a 4B or 6B pencil, but that is entirely personal preference. 

    General’s Pure Woodless Graphite: These pure graphite pencils are a lot of fun to draw with. I usually add them to a pencil lengthener so that I can hold them like a paintbrush. Big, loose marks can be even more fun to draw with—so if you have the ability, give this a try!

    Koh-I-Noor Pencil Lengthener (I add the woodless graphite to this): This pencil lengthener was first introduced to me in art school. My drawing teacher would use compressed charcoal in the extender, and hold it like a paintbrush. It allows an artist to draw with a loose hand, moving the entire arm to create curves and gestures. Without it, sometimes a small nub can be harder to hold onto or can limit the range of motion. 

LATE THURSDAYS! This event is part of the Museum’s Late Thursdays programming, made possible in part by Heather and Paul G. Haaga Jr., Class of 1970. Spanish-language live closed-captioning for this program is made possible by the Rapid Response Magic Project of the Princeton University Humanities Council.

Image: Xochipala, Late Formative, Seated adult and youth, 400 B.C.–A.D. 200. Red-brown micaceous ceramic. Princeton University Art Museum. Gift of Gillett G. Griffin in honor of David W. Steadman, Graduate School Class of 1969

Art and Music: Touching Sound

We hear music. But what does music look like? A picture is worth a thousand sounds. Art and music complement one another and form a connection. The stimuli from each strengthen the other. Artists find their inspiration from many sources.

 

The artists of Princeton Artists’ Alliance are collaborating with the musicians of Mobius Percussion in the exhibition Art and Music: Touching Sound. Inspired by the musicians’ performance of Paper Melodies (my music box music) composed by Jason Treuting of So Percussion, the visual artists have created paintings, drawings, and sculptures.

 

In this collaborative project, the artists have searched for their imagery through the original music. The musicians have the opportunity to see how visual artists interpret their work and likewise, artists have the opportunity to visually record the influence of musical sounds.

 

A recording of Paper Melodies will be playing in the gallery as visitors view the artwork. Standing before the art and listening to the musical score offers the viewer a richer sensory experience.

 

This exhibition will enhance the human experience between listening and seeing.

 

The artists have all created new works for this show. Art and Music: Touching Sound will reflect the varied interpretation and influence the same composition has for each artist. The viewer will experience their own connections with the visual sights and sounds.

 

Co-curated by Donna Payton and Kathleen Preziosi.

[caption id="attachment_26019" align="aligncenter" width="472"] Joy Kreves[/caption] [caption id="attachment_26016" align="aligncenter" width="474"] Donna Payton[/caption]

Friday, October 23

Art and Music: Touching Sound

We hear music. But what does music look like? A picture is worth a thousand sounds. Art and music complement one another and form a connection. The stimuli from each strengthen the other. Artists find their inspiration from many sources.

 

The artists of Princeton Artists’ Alliance are collaborating with the musicians of Mobius Percussion in the exhibition Art and Music: Touching Sound. Inspired by the musicians’ performance of Paper Melodies (my music box music) composed by Jason Treuting of So Percussion, the visual artists have created paintings, drawings, and sculptures.

 

In this collaborative project, the artists have searched for their imagery through the original music. The musicians have the opportunity to see how visual artists interpret their work and likewise, artists have the opportunity to visually record the influence of musical sounds.

 

A recording of Paper Melodies will be playing in the gallery as visitors view the artwork. Standing before the art and listening to the musical score offers the viewer a richer sensory experience.

 

This exhibition will enhance the human experience between listening and seeing.

 

The artists have all created new works for this show. Art and Music: Touching Sound will reflect the varied interpretation and influence the same composition has for each artist. The viewer will experience their own connections with the visual sights and sounds.

 

Co-curated by Donna Payton and Kathleen Preziosi.

[caption id="attachment_26019" align="aligncenter" width="472"] Joy Kreves[/caption] [caption id="attachment_26016" align="aligncenter" width="474"] Donna Payton[/caption]

Saturday, October 24

Art & About: Princeton Makes ARt

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Presented by the Arts Council of Princeton, Art & About is a six-week series of public art-inspired pop-up experiences designed to activate our downtown and provide safe, creative experiences for our community.

 

Join Princeton’s first ever Augmented Reality Art Challenge by downloading the Just a Line app that allows you to draw on top of any location in Princeton! Just point your camera to where you want to draw, and start creating your artwork on your phone. Submit your work using the hashtag #princetonmakesARt on Instagram to be entered into a drawing for a prize package courtesy of the Arts Council. Submit your drawing by 8pm to be considered!

 

Day of the Dead Workshop: Sugar Skulls

- $30 ACP Members/$35 Non-Members

Celebrate el Día de los Muertos with the Arts Council of Princeton! Join us for socially-distanced, outdoor workshops to learn about this culturally rich holiday and the traditional folk arts associated with Day of the Dead.

 

Everyone loves making and decorating sugar skulls for Day of the Dead. In our previous festivals we have made hundreds! Learn how to mix the sugar with meringue powder to pack into a traditional mold. Royal icings are used to embellish your skull which is typically placed on the altar or ofrenda. Wear clothing you won’t mind getting messy, and see how magical a sugar skull can be! Please note: students will need to bring their own mixing bowl and spatula. Ages 10+.

 

Not only will you learn a new folk art craft, but you’ll be invited to display your work in our Day of the Dead Exhibition in our Taplin Gallery from November 1-14!

 

[caption id="attachment_28067" align="aligncenter" width="300"] .[/caption]

El Día de los Muertos is observed in Mexico and throughout the world this time of year, where family and friends gather to remember and honor those who have died. Traditions connected with the holiday include building private altars using sugar skulls, marigolds, and favorite foods of the deceased to celebrate their lives!

Workshops will be held following all mandated guidelines, including proper social-distancing, temperature checks, and of course, masks are a must! Some workshops will require a few things brought from home to help ensure safety.The ACP will provide hand sanitizer for frequent use. In the event of inclement weather, workshops will be held in our spacious Solley Theater.

Additional Day of the Dead workshops:

  • October 10 — Papel Picado & Paper Flowers
  • October 17 —  Nichos & Calaveras
  • November 7 — Day of the Dead traditions with Child & Caregiver

Art and Music: Touching Sound

We hear music. But what does music look like? A picture is worth a thousand sounds. Art and music complement one another and form a connection. The stimuli from each strengthen the other. Artists find their inspiration from many sources.

 

The artists of Princeton Artists’ Alliance are collaborating with the musicians of Mobius Percussion in the exhibition Art and Music: Touching Sound. Inspired by the musicians’ performance of Paper Melodies (my music box music) composed by Jason Treuting of So Percussion, the visual artists have created paintings, drawings, and sculptures.

 

In this collaborative project, the artists have searched for their imagery through the original music. The musicians have the opportunity to see how visual artists interpret their work and likewise, artists have the opportunity to visually record the influence of musical sounds.

 

A recording of Paper Melodies will be playing in the gallery as visitors view the artwork. Standing before the art and listening to the musical score offers the viewer a richer sensory experience.

 

This exhibition will enhance the human experience between listening and seeing.

 

The artists have all created new works for this show. Art and Music: Touching Sound will reflect the varied interpretation and influence the same composition has for each artist. The viewer will experience their own connections with the visual sights and sounds.

 

Co-curated by Donna Payton and Kathleen Preziosi.

[caption id="attachment_26019" align="aligncenter" width="472"] Joy Kreves[/caption] [caption id="attachment_26016" align="aligncenter" width="474"] Donna Payton[/caption]

Sunday, October 25

Monday, October 26