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Tuesday, March 9

In Conversation with Robin Resch & Timothy M. Andrews

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The Arts Council takes great pride in our diverse community of artists, authors, and creatives of all disciplines. In Conversation is a curated series of discussions designed to celebrate and connect those who make art and those who love art! Breaking down the barriers between artist and art-appreciator, In Conversation delves into inspiration, studio practice, and artistic aspirations.

 

Robin Resch, fine art photographer and current ACP Artist-in-Residence, will be in conversation with Timothy M. Andrews, art collector and major supporter of the Residency program, for virtual conversation.  Register HERE.

This program is free, but donations allow us to continue creating community arts programming for all to enjoy. Please consider making a gift.


Robin Resch is the Arts Council of Princeton’s Winter 2021 Anne Reeves Artist-in-Residence. During her residency, Resch continues work locally on her series, aptly named Taking Pause, in response to the challenges of this year and the COVID-19 pandemic. The completed portraits will be on display in Princeton’s Dohm Alley from April to October.

Taking Pause is a documentary, collaborative portrait project that asks people to reflect on what in their lives feels most essential. With what do we identify and connect most deeply? What truly matters to us and why? 

Robin documents each participant with two distinct portraits: one of their physical self, and an accompanying portrait of their reflective self through what they choose to share. Each participant is then asked to tell the story behind their selection.

“At a time when our country feels so torn and disconnected, this project aims to reconnect and place trust with those we don’t know,” says Resch. “Crucial to this project is its collaborative nature that aspires to connect with people, share stories, and spend time together. In short, to take pause, to reflect.”

Work on this series began in early 2018 with a core group of participants from varying backgrounds. Between November 2018 and March 2019, Resch began to expand the project’s community and network exponentially by working with people across the United States, driving solo 10,553 miles from East to West along a southerly route that naturally evolved and was largely determined by the location of the contributors. Resch’s goal for this Princeton manifestation of her Taking Pause project is to capture as broad a spectrum of the local community as possible. 

“Our lives are so diverse and we’ve all been impacted in similar and yet differing ways,” says Resch. “To some degree, it has been equalizing. In other ways it’s been polarizing. How has it impacted us? Have our values changed? Would we answer the question ‘what is irreplaceable to you?’ differently today than a year ago?”  Her hope is to sow seeds for a conversation that may help heal in such a challenging time and that as a collaborative project, Taking Pause may help rebuild trust by addressing our fears and fostering communication and reflection.

Resch’s work with each participant culminates in two photos and their brief written text, creating a finished portrait set. Five portrait sets will be printed on vinyl banners and be displayed in Dohm Alley, located near the corner of Nassau and Witherspoon streets, from April to October 2021, as a public art display, free and open to the public.

Robin Resch is a Princeton-based photographer who lived in Italy, France, and the Netherlands until 1998. She left Europe to pursue her Master’s in Architecture at Princeton University, which she combined with advanced photographic studies with Emmet Gowin and Andrew Moore. Her architectural training informs her documentary photographic work as she is particularly interested in making images that are about and their personal environments as well as the impact on our collective environments. Her landscape photography, which is more abstract, seeks to explore our human experience of the natural environment.

Resch’s work has been exhibited at Princeton University’s Lucas Gallery, the Pringle Gallery in Philadelphia, Design Within Reach, Princeton Project Space, the Arts Council of Princeton, and the Nassau Club. Her photographs have been published in the New York Timesthe Witte de With Cahiers, the Rotterdams DagbladItalian GQ, and Princeton Magazine. Robin has maintained an active portrait studio since 2003. In 2012, she was honored to be the exclusive campaign photographer for the Princeton fundraising event with First Lady Michelle Obama.

This project would not be possible without the support of Timothy M. Andrews, a longtime friend and supporter of the Arts Council of Princeton, who has generously underwritten the Anne Reeves Artist-in-Residence program for three years. The Arts Council also acknowledges the Princeton University Humanities Council for their generous support.

Wednesday, March 10

Thursday, March 11

Friday, March 12

Saturday, March 13

Textured Waters

When artists Susan DeConcini and Léni Paquet-Morante submitted individual proposals for an exhibition, the Arts Council’s gallery committee saw an exciting pairing because of their shared interest in water as a subject matter. Susan’s watercolors on paper explore her interest in the movement and textures of ocean waves and other water surfaces in motion. Painted at a variety of water environments, Leni’s plein-air landscape interpretations inform her studio work.

Together, these artists’ works provide a contemplation of water as both a familiar subject and intriguing metaphor.

 

[caption id="attachment_28980" align="aligncenter" width="500"] Léni Paquet-Morante
Eddies on a Riverbank, 2020[/caption]

I paint landscapes that prompt a narrative about water as it engages its surrounding embankments, the detritus within it, and the bio-matter growing from it. I am as interested in moving paint around as I am in these narratives and so use dynamic brushwork to drive a contemporary interpretation rather than a portrait of place. Working outdoors in a variety of settings over the last two years has inspired the work that I do in the studio, which tends to be more abstract. Near home, I’ve frequented the Abbott Marshlands in Hamilton, the Raritan Canal, the Dyson Tract, the Sourlands, and Grounds For Sculpture ponds. Traveling for further inspiration, I painted in France for two weeks; went several times to the Bay of Fundy in Canada; discovered Cape Cod and the Pennsylvania Adirondacks; was blown away by New Zealand’s coastlines; and returned to familiar Maryland rivers and hilly forests.

 

The landscape paintings in Textured Waters reflect my commute through the world as I was drawn to vistas and intimate spaces alike.
– Léni Paquet-Morante

 

[caption id="attachment_28981" align="aligncenter" width="500"] Susan DeConcini
Aubergine Waves, 2021[/caption]

“I have always had a studio, but never before has it been as necessary a respite as it had since the start of this pandemic. Like many others, I lost my full-time job in the spring of 2020. Suddenly, I was in my studio full time, rapidly creating this group of paintings.

 

I have primarily chosen my watercolor subjects as a way to learn and understand how to capture physical forms. I love painting in the wild – it captures the mood and energy of a time a moment more than my photographs can. Clouds and water have been the most elusive in these sketches. I started this series in an effort to improve on my waterscapes and clouds.

 

However, over the past year, my work has become more about accessing the calm in myself. I have always moved through different subjects quickly, and yet lingered on water for the better part of the past two years. The nature of watercolor offers an element of performance – you need to focus on each brushstroke to get it right, and if you make a mistake you either need to integrate it or abandon the whole piece. Painting water helps take away the tension so the calm can seep in. When I am focused on catching the glint of a reflection or the deep color of a wave’s shadow, I am not thinking about the stressors of pandemic life.

 

The paintings in Textured Waters are part of my continued pursuit to understand the endless forms and expressions that water can take, and to engage my delight in capturing the complexity of a single moment in the shape of a wave.”
– Susan Deconcini


About Léni Paquet-Morante:
Léni Paquet-Morante was born in Canada, raised in Maryland, and moved to New Jersey in 1984. A full-time artist since 2018, her 550 square foot studio is within the Grounds For Sculpture complex. Solo exhibitions of her work have been held at Mercer County Community College (2021), Johnson & Johnson Corporate Headquarters (1998 and 2019), Center for Gender Studies at Princeton University (1995 and 2017), Passaic County Community College (1996). Her paintings and sculptures have been included in group shows since 1984. She is listed in the Women Artists of America National Directory and is registered with the Canada Arts Council. See more of Léni’s work on her website and on her Instagram.

 

About Susan DeConcini:
Susan DeConcini is an artist living in Lambertville, New Jersey. She has primarily worked as a Scenic Artist, painting theatrical sets at McCarter Theatre in Princeton, NJ. Susan has displayed her work at Small World Coffee in Princeton, the Boro Bean in Hopewell, as well as Cobblestone Creek Country Club. She has participated in Garden State Watercolor Society’s 2018 & 2019 Juried shows, as well as the 2020 Member Show. Her waterscapes and cloudscapes were most recently displayed at the Princeton Public Library over the winter of 2019-2020. In June, she joined the Arts Council of Princeton as a featured artist in their In Conversation virtual interviews, as well as participating in the 2020 Sauce for the Goose Art Market and the Princeton Winter Village Artist Chalets. See more of Susan’s work on her website and on her Instagram.

Sunday, March 14

Textured Waters

When artists Susan DeConcini and Léni Paquet-Morante submitted individual proposals for an exhibition, the Arts Council’s gallery committee saw an exciting pairing because of their shared interest in water as a subject matter. Susan’s watercolors on paper explore her interest in the movement and textures of ocean waves and other water surfaces in motion. Painted at a variety of water environments, Leni’s plein-air landscape interpretations inform her studio work.

Together, these artists’ works provide a contemplation of water as both a familiar subject and intriguing metaphor.

 

[caption id="attachment_28980" align="aligncenter" width="500"] Léni Paquet-Morante
Eddies on a Riverbank, 2020[/caption]

I paint landscapes that prompt a narrative about water as it engages its surrounding embankments, the detritus within it, and the bio-matter growing from it. I am as interested in moving paint around as I am in these narratives and so use dynamic brushwork to drive a contemporary interpretation rather than a portrait of place. Working outdoors in a variety of settings over the last two years has inspired the work that I do in the studio, which tends to be more abstract. Near home, I’ve frequented the Abbott Marshlands in Hamilton, the Raritan Canal, the Dyson Tract, the Sourlands, and Grounds For Sculpture ponds. Traveling for further inspiration, I painted in France for two weeks; went several times to the Bay of Fundy in Canada; discovered Cape Cod and the Pennsylvania Adirondacks; was blown away by New Zealand’s coastlines; and returned to familiar Maryland rivers and hilly forests.

 

The landscape paintings in Textured Waters reflect my commute through the world as I was drawn to vistas and intimate spaces alike.
– Léni Paquet-Morante

 

[caption id="attachment_28981" align="aligncenter" width="500"] Susan DeConcini
Aubergine Waves, 2021[/caption]

“I have always had a studio, but never before has it been as necessary a respite as it had since the start of this pandemic. Like many others, I lost my full-time job in the spring of 2020. Suddenly, I was in my studio full time, rapidly creating this group of paintings.

 

I have primarily chosen my watercolor subjects as a way to learn and understand how to capture physical forms. I love painting in the wild – it captures the mood and energy of a time a moment more than my photographs can. Clouds and water have been the most elusive in these sketches. I started this series in an effort to improve on my waterscapes and clouds.

 

However, over the past year, my work has become more about accessing the calm in myself. I have always moved through different subjects quickly, and yet lingered on water for the better part of the past two years. The nature of watercolor offers an element of performance – you need to focus on each brushstroke to get it right, and if you make a mistake you either need to integrate it or abandon the whole piece. Painting water helps take away the tension so the calm can seep in. When I am focused on catching the glint of a reflection or the deep color of a wave’s shadow, I am not thinking about the stressors of pandemic life.

 

The paintings in Textured Waters are part of my continued pursuit to understand the endless forms and expressions that water can take, and to engage my delight in capturing the complexity of a single moment in the shape of a wave.”
– Susan Deconcini


About Léni Paquet-Morante:
Léni Paquet-Morante was born in Canada, raised in Maryland, and moved to New Jersey in 1984. A full-time artist since 2018, her 550 square foot studio is within the Grounds For Sculpture complex. Solo exhibitions of her work have been held at Mercer County Community College (2021), Johnson & Johnson Corporate Headquarters (1998 and 2019), Center for Gender Studies at Princeton University (1995 and 2017), Passaic County Community College (1996). Her paintings and sculptures have been included in group shows since 1984. She is listed in the Women Artists of America National Directory and is registered with the Canada Arts Council. See more of Léni’s work on her website and on her Instagram.

 

About Susan DeConcini:
Susan DeConcini is an artist living in Lambertville, New Jersey. She has primarily worked as a Scenic Artist, painting theatrical sets at McCarter Theatre in Princeton, NJ. Susan has displayed her work at Small World Coffee in Princeton, the Boro Bean in Hopewell, as well as Cobblestone Creek Country Club. She has participated in Garden State Watercolor Society’s 2018 & 2019 Juried shows, as well as the 2020 Member Show. Her waterscapes and cloudscapes were most recently displayed at the Princeton Public Library over the winter of 2019-2020. In June, she joined the Arts Council of Princeton as a featured artist in their In Conversation virtual interviews, as well as participating in the 2020 Sauce for the Goose Art Market and the Princeton Winter Village Artist Chalets. See more of Susan’s work on her website and on her Instagram.

Monday, March 15

Textured Waters

When artists Susan DeConcini and Léni Paquet-Morante submitted individual proposals for an exhibition, the Arts Council’s gallery committee saw an exciting pairing because of their shared interest in water as a subject matter. Susan’s watercolors on paper explore her interest in the movement and textures of ocean waves and other water surfaces in motion. Painted at a variety of water environments, Leni’s plein-air landscape interpretations inform her studio work.

Together, these artists’ works provide a contemplation of water as both a familiar subject and intriguing metaphor.

 

[caption id="attachment_28980" align="aligncenter" width="500"] Léni Paquet-Morante
Eddies on a Riverbank, 2020[/caption]

I paint landscapes that prompt a narrative about water as it engages its surrounding embankments, the detritus within it, and the bio-matter growing from it. I am as interested in moving paint around as I am in these narratives and so use dynamic brushwork to drive a contemporary interpretation rather than a portrait of place. Working outdoors in a variety of settings over the last two years has inspired the work that I do in the studio, which tends to be more abstract. Near home, I’ve frequented the Abbott Marshlands in Hamilton, the Raritan Canal, the Dyson Tract, the Sourlands, and Grounds For Sculpture ponds. Traveling for further inspiration, I painted in France for two weeks; went several times to the Bay of Fundy in Canada; discovered Cape Cod and the Pennsylvania Adirondacks; was blown away by New Zealand’s coastlines; and returned to familiar Maryland rivers and hilly forests.

 

The landscape paintings in Textured Waters reflect my commute through the world as I was drawn to vistas and intimate spaces alike.
– Léni Paquet-Morante

 

[caption id="attachment_28981" align="aligncenter" width="500"] Susan DeConcini
Aubergine Waves, 2021[/caption]

“I have always had a studio, but never before has it been as necessary a respite as it had since the start of this pandemic. Like many others, I lost my full-time job in the spring of 2020. Suddenly, I was in my studio full time, rapidly creating this group of paintings.

 

I have primarily chosen my watercolor subjects as a way to learn and understand how to capture physical forms. I love painting in the wild – it captures the mood and energy of a time a moment more than my photographs can. Clouds and water have been the most elusive in these sketches. I started this series in an effort to improve on my waterscapes and clouds.

 

However, over the past year, my work has become more about accessing the calm in myself. I have always moved through different subjects quickly, and yet lingered on water for the better part of the past two years. The nature of watercolor offers an element of performance – you need to focus on each brushstroke to get it right, and if you make a mistake you either need to integrate it or abandon the whole piece. Painting water helps take away the tension so the calm can seep in. When I am focused on catching the glint of a reflection or the deep color of a wave’s shadow, I am not thinking about the stressors of pandemic life.

 

The paintings in Textured Waters are part of my continued pursuit to understand the endless forms and expressions that water can take, and to engage my delight in capturing the complexity of a single moment in the shape of a wave.”
– Susan Deconcini


About Léni Paquet-Morante:
Léni Paquet-Morante was born in Canada, raised in Maryland, and moved to New Jersey in 1984. A full-time artist since 2018, her 550 square foot studio is within the Grounds For Sculpture complex. Solo exhibitions of her work have been held at Mercer County Community College (2021), Johnson & Johnson Corporate Headquarters (1998 and 2019), Center for Gender Studies at Princeton University (1995 and 2017), Passaic County Community College (1996). Her paintings and sculptures have been included in group shows since 1984. She is listed in the Women Artists of America National Directory and is registered with the Canada Arts Council. See more of Léni’s work on her website and on her Instagram.

 

About Susan DeConcini:
Susan DeConcini is an artist living in Lambertville, New Jersey. She has primarily worked as a Scenic Artist, painting theatrical sets at McCarter Theatre in Princeton, NJ. Susan has displayed her work at Small World Coffee in Princeton, the Boro Bean in Hopewell, as well as Cobblestone Creek Country Club. She has participated in Garden State Watercolor Society’s 2018 & 2019 Juried shows, as well as the 2020 Member Show. Her waterscapes and cloudscapes were most recently displayed at the Princeton Public Library over the winter of 2019-2020. In June, she joined the Arts Council of Princeton as a featured artist in their In Conversation virtual interviews, as well as participating in the 2020 Sauce for the Goose Art Market and the Princeton Winter Village Artist Chalets. See more of Susan’s work on her website and on her Instagram.