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Thursday, April 15

A Voice to be Heard

A Voice to be Heard explores the idea of the inner voice and the ongoing search for meaning, connection, and sense of place. The artists explore ideas of belonging that seem truly important in our contemporary life and in a society that too often feels polarized and isolated, inviting us to reflect on our points of view and shared humanity.

 

Joyce Kozloff in her series “girlhood” visually collaborated with her younger self through using childhood drawings in her current work that reflect on her education, and perception of the world. She explains that through the work “A visual dialogue between my childhood and adulthood…my conventional grammar school innocence felt weirdly relevant-within our polarized society, where so many people hold onto fantasies about recovering an imaginary past.”

 

The role of story in shaping knowledge, assumptions, our own origins and political views, is similarly explored by Maria de Los Angeles, through the voice of the personal. She exposes the internalized dialogue and external narratives surrounding migration through humor, story, facts, and allegory. A deeply felt voice blends the political, personal, and the mythological together.

 

[caption id="attachment_28458" align="aligncenter" width="338"] Maria de Los Angeles[/caption]

Martha Tuttle turns her attention to the sublime, finding inspiration in the vast space of the west, its’ almost invisible processes and moments, and the relationship of her physicality to place reflected through process. She invites us to a different type of listening, a more physical and slow one. She explains, “I see these practices as allowing material variation, as well as touch (my own, a place’s, a process’s) to be recorded into material form…Looking towards the future, I would like my practice to center in the study of the potentially vital relationship between the noticed/touched/cared for object and growing a practice of tenderness to our external world.”

 

A search for connection is explored and question by Buket Savci in her paintings. She explains, “I explore abundance versus emotional craving. Observing both the loneliness and need for attention, accompanied with consumerism frenzy globally.” Perhaps this need for connection is amplified by how we share our lives through social media and the lives of those around us, ever so joyous.

[caption id="attachment_29065" align="aligncenter" width="600"] Buket Savci[/caption]

Adam Moss takes a quieter look at human connection through portraiture of friends and family considering the psychology of the self and implication of the gaze. His portraits are vulnerable, sympathetic, stylized, and convey a sense of alienation and mystery. The subject has an intense gaze joyously juxtaposed by delicate application, color and detail. He explains “I wanted to make portraits rooted in realism that were heavily influenced by the subjective eye.”

 

[caption id="attachment_28457" align="aligncenter" width="750"] Ryan Bonilla[/caption]

That need to collect memories of our experiences, is visible, in the work of Ryan Bonilla, who through photography captures the spontaneity of everyday life in his culture. His work represents the feeling, ambiance, and freedom of his lifestyle and captures the rawness and innocence lost in our age and society.

 

Shelter Serra similarly looks at society for its voice, the role of technology, and of production. Serra explains” by continually repeating the same structure, similarities and differences emerge-reflecting on our own individuality in a world of progress and chaos.”

 

Brooklyn Based artist, designer, filmmaker Frenel Morris creates lucid, intimate paintings capturing simulacrum in seemingly ordinary objects to deliver a vivid copy of reality.  

Taking Pause

Taking Pause is a documentary portrait project created by ACP Artist-in-Residence Robin Resch that asks people to reflect on what in their lives feels most essential. The project is on view in Princeton’s Dohm Alley from April-October 2021.

 

With what do we identify and connect most deeply? What truly matters to us, and why?   

 

This series seeks to create telling portraits of people through what is deeply meaningful to them. To make these portraits, photographer Resch ask each participant the same simple thought-provoking question: “what is irreplaceable to you?”

 

Each person is documented with two distinct portraits.  One of their physical self and another of their reflective self, through what they have chosen to share. It is a collaborative project as those who participate are more than passing subjects. In addition to sharing something of deep personal resonance, each participant also tells the story behind what they chose and engages others to take part in the project. 

 

Taking Pause combines photographs and stories in a visual and verbal narrative that explores the complexities and simplicities of what we value. The intent is to document the differences and commonalities of these choices while engaging the spectrum of American diversity and disconnections.

 

Work on this series began in early 2018 with a core group of participants from varying backgrounds. Between November 2018 and March 2019, Resch began to expand the project’s community and network exponentially by working with people across the United States, driving solo 10,553 miles from East to West along a southerly route that naturally evolved and was largely determined by the location of the contributors. Resch’s goal for this Princeton manifestation of her Taking Pause project is to capture as broad a spectrum of the local community as possible. 

 

“Our lives are so diverse and we’ve all been impacted in similar and yet differing ways,” says Resch. “To some degree, it has been equalizing. In other ways it’s been polarizing. How has it impacted us? Have our values changed? Would we answer the question ‘what is irreplaceable to you?’ differently today than a year ago?”  Her hope is to sow seeds for a conversation that may help heal in such a challenging time and that as a collaborative project, Taking Pause may help rebuild trust by addressing our fears and fostering communication and reflection.

 

Resch’s work with each participant culminates in two photos and their brief written text, creating a finished portrait set. Five portrait sets will be printed on vinyl banners and be displayed in Dohm Alley, located near the corner of Nassau and Witherspoon streets, from April to October 2021, as a public art display, free and open to the public.

 

Robin Resch is a Princeton-based photographer who lived in Italy, France, and the Netherlands until 1998. She left Europe to pursue her Master’s in Architecture at Princeton University, which she combined with advanced photographic studies with Emmet Gowin and Andrew Moore. Her architectural training informs her documentary photographic work as she is particularly interested in making images that are about and their personal environments as well as the impact on our collective environments. Her landscape photography, which is more abstract, seeks to explore our human experience of the natural environment.

 

Resch’s work has been exhibited at Princeton University’s Lucas Gallery, the Pringle Gallery in Philadelphia, Design Within Reach, Princeton Project Space, the Arts Council of Princeton, and the Nassau Club. Her photographs have been published in the New York Times, the Witte de With Cahiers, the Rotterdams Dagblad, Italian GQ, and Princeton Magazine. Robin has maintained an active portrait studio since 2003. In 2012, she was honored to be the exclusive campaign photographer for the Princeton fundraising event with First Lady Michelle Obama.



This project would not be possible without the support of Timothy M. Andrews, a longtime friend and supporter of the Arts Council of Princeton, who has generously underwritten the Anne Reeves Artist-in-Residence program for three years. The Arts Council also acknowledges the Princeton University Humanities Council and Princeton Future for their generous support.

UNTITLED 2017 (FEAR EATS THE SOUL) (WHITE FLAG)

 

The Arts Council of Princeton presents UNTITLED 2017 (FEAR EATS THE SOUL) (WHITE FLAG)  by Rirkrit Tiravanija

Tiravanija’s piece was created as part of Creative Time’s Pledges of Allegiance, a nationwide public art project that commissioned sixteen flags, each created by acclaimed contemporary artists. Each flag embodies art’s ability to channel political passion, points to an issue the artist is passionate about, and speaks to how we might move forward collectively as a country.

The message of Rirkrit Tiravanija’s flag is a reference to German filmmaker Rainer Werner Fassbinder’s film “Ali: Fear Eats the Soul” where the two lead characters struggle with, and ultimately confront, their own internal racism. 

Originally intended as a temporary installation during Black History Month, the Arts Council has decided to fly this flag once more as we witness the unjust racism towards Asian Americans across our country.

 

 

Friday, April 16

Cabernet Cabaret - Emerge from the Dark: Songs to Spring Forth!

- $25
[caption id="attachment_29337" align="aligncenter" width="650"] .[/caption]

We have been hunkered down for what has been the darkest winter for many of us. Cabernet Cabaret 2020 was the last live show that Sarah Donner performed prior to the pandemic lockdown. Let’s raise a glass and join Sarah and her cast of friends for a virtual evening of showtunes celebrating new beginnings and the light at the end of these dark days! Like past performances, you will be heartened with their hope, sequins, and jazz hands. Selections include songs from Frozen, West Side Story, The Sound of Music, Into The Woods, and Ragtime.

 

As a Cabernet Cabaret ticket holder, receive access to an exclusive discount code for 15% off select wines from Princeton Corkscrew WIne Shop!

All proceeds benefit the Arts Council of Princeton’s community programs! Get your tickets!

 

[caption id="attachment_29338" align="aligncenter" width="650"] .[/caption]

Thank you to the Copper Beech Group at Morgan Stanley and Princeton Corkscrew Wine Shop for their generous support of this program.

[caption id="attachment_29465" align="aligncenter" width="300"] .[/caption]

 

 

A Voice to be Heard

A Voice to be Heard explores the idea of the inner voice and the ongoing search for meaning, connection, and sense of place. The artists explore ideas of belonging that seem truly important in our contemporary life and in a society that too often feels polarized and isolated, inviting us to reflect on our points of view and shared humanity.

 

Joyce Kozloff in her series “girlhood” visually collaborated with her younger self through using childhood drawings in her current work that reflect on her education, and perception of the world. She explains that through the work “A visual dialogue between my childhood and adulthood…my conventional grammar school innocence felt weirdly relevant-within our polarized society, where so many people hold onto fantasies about recovering an imaginary past.”

 

The role of story in shaping knowledge, assumptions, our own origins and political views, is similarly explored by Maria de Los Angeles, through the voice of the personal. She exposes the internalized dialogue and external narratives surrounding migration through humor, story, facts, and allegory. A deeply felt voice blends the political, personal, and the mythological together.

 

[caption id="attachment_28458" align="aligncenter" width="338"] Maria de Los Angeles[/caption]

Martha Tuttle turns her attention to the sublime, finding inspiration in the vast space of the west, its’ almost invisible processes and moments, and the relationship of her physicality to place reflected through process. She invites us to a different type of listening, a more physical and slow one. She explains, “I see these practices as allowing material variation, as well as touch (my own, a place’s, a process’s) to be recorded into material form…Looking towards the future, I would like my practice to center in the study of the potentially vital relationship between the noticed/touched/cared for object and growing a practice of tenderness to our external world.”

 

A search for connection is explored and question by Buket Savci in her paintings. She explains, “I explore abundance versus emotional craving. Observing both the loneliness and need for attention, accompanied with consumerism frenzy globally.” Perhaps this need for connection is amplified by how we share our lives through social media and the lives of those around us, ever so joyous.

[caption id="attachment_29065" align="aligncenter" width="600"] Buket Savci[/caption]

Adam Moss takes a quieter look at human connection through portraiture of friends and family considering the psychology of the self and implication of the gaze. His portraits are vulnerable, sympathetic, stylized, and convey a sense of alienation and mystery. The subject has an intense gaze joyously juxtaposed by delicate application, color and detail. He explains “I wanted to make portraits rooted in realism that were heavily influenced by the subjective eye.”

 

[caption id="attachment_28457" align="aligncenter" width="750"] Ryan Bonilla[/caption]

That need to collect memories of our experiences, is visible, in the work of Ryan Bonilla, who through photography captures the spontaneity of everyday life in his culture. His work represents the feeling, ambiance, and freedom of his lifestyle and captures the rawness and innocence lost in our age and society.

 

Shelter Serra similarly looks at society for its voice, the role of technology, and of production. Serra explains” by continually repeating the same structure, similarities and differences emerge-reflecting on our own individuality in a world of progress and chaos.”

 

Brooklyn Based artist, designer, filmmaker Frenel Morris creates lucid, intimate paintings capturing simulacrum in seemingly ordinary objects to deliver a vivid copy of reality.  

Taking Pause

Taking Pause is a documentary portrait project created by ACP Artist-in-Residence Robin Resch that asks people to reflect on what in their lives feels most essential. The project is on view in Princeton’s Dohm Alley from April-October 2021.

 

With what do we identify and connect most deeply? What truly matters to us, and why?   

 

This series seeks to create telling portraits of people through what is deeply meaningful to them. To make these portraits, photographer Resch ask each participant the same simple thought-provoking question: “what is irreplaceable to you?”

 

Each person is documented with two distinct portraits.  One of their physical self and another of their reflective self, through what they have chosen to share. It is a collaborative project as those who participate are more than passing subjects. In addition to sharing something of deep personal resonance, each participant also tells the story behind what they chose and engages others to take part in the project. 

 

Taking Pause combines photographs and stories in a visual and verbal narrative that explores the complexities and simplicities of what we value. The intent is to document the differences and commonalities of these choices while engaging the spectrum of American diversity and disconnections.

 

Work on this series began in early 2018 with a core group of participants from varying backgrounds. Between November 2018 and March 2019, Resch began to expand the project’s community and network exponentially by working with people across the United States, driving solo 10,553 miles from East to West along a southerly route that naturally evolved and was largely determined by the location of the contributors. Resch’s goal for this Princeton manifestation of her Taking Pause project is to capture as broad a spectrum of the local community as possible. 

 

“Our lives are so diverse and we’ve all been impacted in similar and yet differing ways,” says Resch. “To some degree, it has been equalizing. In other ways it’s been polarizing. How has it impacted us? Have our values changed? Would we answer the question ‘what is irreplaceable to you?’ differently today than a year ago?”  Her hope is to sow seeds for a conversation that may help heal in such a challenging time and that as a collaborative project, Taking Pause may help rebuild trust by addressing our fears and fostering communication and reflection.

 

Resch’s work with each participant culminates in two photos and their brief written text, creating a finished portrait set. Five portrait sets will be printed on vinyl banners and be displayed in Dohm Alley, located near the corner of Nassau and Witherspoon streets, from April to October 2021, as a public art display, free and open to the public.

 

Robin Resch is a Princeton-based photographer who lived in Italy, France, and the Netherlands until 1998. She left Europe to pursue her Master’s in Architecture at Princeton University, which she combined with advanced photographic studies with Emmet Gowin and Andrew Moore. Her architectural training informs her documentary photographic work as she is particularly interested in making images that are about and their personal environments as well as the impact on our collective environments. Her landscape photography, which is more abstract, seeks to explore our human experience of the natural environment.

 

Resch’s work has been exhibited at Princeton University’s Lucas Gallery, the Pringle Gallery in Philadelphia, Design Within Reach, Princeton Project Space, the Arts Council of Princeton, and the Nassau Club. Her photographs have been published in the New York Times, the Witte de With Cahiers, the Rotterdams Dagblad, Italian GQ, and Princeton Magazine. Robin has maintained an active portrait studio since 2003. In 2012, she was honored to be the exclusive campaign photographer for the Princeton fundraising event with First Lady Michelle Obama.



This project would not be possible without the support of Timothy M. Andrews, a longtime friend and supporter of the Arts Council of Princeton, who has generously underwritten the Anne Reeves Artist-in-Residence program for three years. The Arts Council also acknowledges the Princeton University Humanities Council and Princeton Future for their generous support.

UNTITLED 2017 (FEAR EATS THE SOUL) (WHITE FLAG)

 

The Arts Council of Princeton presents UNTITLED 2017 (FEAR EATS THE SOUL) (WHITE FLAG)  by Rirkrit Tiravanija

Tiravanija’s piece was created as part of Creative Time’s Pledges of Allegiance, a nationwide public art project that commissioned sixteen flags, each created by acclaimed contemporary artists. Each flag embodies art’s ability to channel political passion, points to an issue the artist is passionate about, and speaks to how we might move forward collectively as a country.

The message of Rirkrit Tiravanija’s flag is a reference to German filmmaker Rainer Werner Fassbinder’s film “Ali: Fear Eats the Soul” where the two lead characters struggle with, and ultimately confront, their own internal racism. 

Originally intended as a temporary installation during Black History Month, the Arts Council has decided to fly this flag once more as we witness the unjust racism towards Asian Americans across our country.

 

 

Saturday, April 17

A Voice to be Heard

A Voice to be Heard explores the idea of the inner voice and the ongoing search for meaning, connection, and sense of place. The artists explore ideas of belonging that seem truly important in our contemporary life and in a society that too often feels polarized and isolated, inviting us to reflect on our points of view and shared humanity.

 

Joyce Kozloff in her series “girlhood” visually collaborated with her younger self through using childhood drawings in her current work that reflect on her education, and perception of the world. She explains that through the work “A visual dialogue between my childhood and adulthood…my conventional grammar school innocence felt weirdly relevant-within our polarized society, where so many people hold onto fantasies about recovering an imaginary past.”

 

The role of story in shaping knowledge, assumptions, our own origins and political views, is similarly explored by Maria de Los Angeles, through the voice of the personal. She exposes the internalized dialogue and external narratives surrounding migration through humor, story, facts, and allegory. A deeply felt voice blends the political, personal, and the mythological together.

 

[caption id="attachment_28458" align="aligncenter" width="338"] Maria de Los Angeles[/caption]

Martha Tuttle turns her attention to the sublime, finding inspiration in the vast space of the west, its’ almost invisible processes and moments, and the relationship of her physicality to place reflected through process. She invites us to a different type of listening, a more physical and slow one. She explains, “I see these practices as allowing material variation, as well as touch (my own, a place’s, a process’s) to be recorded into material form…Looking towards the future, I would like my practice to center in the study of the potentially vital relationship between the noticed/touched/cared for object and growing a practice of tenderness to our external world.”

 

A search for connection is explored and question by Buket Savci in her paintings. She explains, “I explore abundance versus emotional craving. Observing both the loneliness and need for attention, accompanied with consumerism frenzy globally.” Perhaps this need for connection is amplified by how we share our lives through social media and the lives of those around us, ever so joyous.

[caption id="attachment_29065" align="aligncenter" width="600"] Buket Savci[/caption]

Adam Moss takes a quieter look at human connection through portraiture of friends and family considering the psychology of the self and implication of the gaze. His portraits are vulnerable, sympathetic, stylized, and convey a sense of alienation and mystery. The subject has an intense gaze joyously juxtaposed by delicate application, color and detail. He explains “I wanted to make portraits rooted in realism that were heavily influenced by the subjective eye.”

 

[caption id="attachment_28457" align="aligncenter" width="750"] Ryan Bonilla[/caption]

That need to collect memories of our experiences, is visible, in the work of Ryan Bonilla, who through photography captures the spontaneity of everyday life in his culture. His work represents the feeling, ambiance, and freedom of his lifestyle and captures the rawness and innocence lost in our age and society.

 

Shelter Serra similarly looks at society for its voice, the role of technology, and of production. Serra explains” by continually repeating the same structure, similarities and differences emerge-reflecting on our own individuality in a world of progress and chaos.”

 

Brooklyn Based artist, designer, filmmaker Frenel Morris creates lucid, intimate paintings capturing simulacrum in seemingly ordinary objects to deliver a vivid copy of reality.  

Taking Pause

Taking Pause is a documentary portrait project created by ACP Artist-in-Residence Robin Resch that asks people to reflect on what in their lives feels most essential. The project is on view in Princeton’s Dohm Alley from April-October 2021.

 

With what do we identify and connect most deeply? What truly matters to us, and why?   

 

This series seeks to create telling portraits of people through what is deeply meaningful to them. To make these portraits, photographer Resch ask each participant the same simple thought-provoking question: “what is irreplaceable to you?”

 

Each person is documented with two distinct portraits.  One of their physical self and another of their reflective self, through what they have chosen to share. It is a collaborative project as those who participate are more than passing subjects. In addition to sharing something of deep personal resonance, each participant also tells the story behind what they chose and engages others to take part in the project. 

 

Taking Pause combines photographs and stories in a visual and verbal narrative that explores the complexities and simplicities of what we value. The intent is to document the differences and commonalities of these choices while engaging the spectrum of American diversity and disconnections.

 

Work on this series began in early 2018 with a core group of participants from varying backgrounds. Between November 2018 and March 2019, Resch began to expand the project’s community and network exponentially by working with people across the United States, driving solo 10,553 miles from East to West along a southerly route that naturally evolved and was largely determined by the location of the contributors. Resch’s goal for this Princeton manifestation of her Taking Pause project is to capture as broad a spectrum of the local community as possible. 

 

“Our lives are so diverse and we’ve all been impacted in similar and yet differing ways,” says Resch. “To some degree, it has been equalizing. In other ways it’s been polarizing. How has it impacted us? Have our values changed? Would we answer the question ‘what is irreplaceable to you?’ differently today than a year ago?”  Her hope is to sow seeds for a conversation that may help heal in such a challenging time and that as a collaborative project, Taking Pause may help rebuild trust by addressing our fears and fostering communication and reflection.

 

Resch’s work with each participant culminates in two photos and their brief written text, creating a finished portrait set. Five portrait sets will be printed on vinyl banners and be displayed in Dohm Alley, located near the corner of Nassau and Witherspoon streets, from April to October 2021, as a public art display, free and open to the public.

 

Robin Resch is a Princeton-based photographer who lived in Italy, France, and the Netherlands until 1998. She left Europe to pursue her Master’s in Architecture at Princeton University, which she combined with advanced photographic studies with Emmet Gowin and Andrew Moore. Her architectural training informs her documentary photographic work as she is particularly interested in making images that are about and their personal environments as well as the impact on our collective environments. Her landscape photography, which is more abstract, seeks to explore our human experience of the natural environment.

 

Resch’s work has been exhibited at Princeton University’s Lucas Gallery, the Pringle Gallery in Philadelphia, Design Within Reach, Princeton Project Space, the Arts Council of Princeton, and the Nassau Club. Her photographs have been published in the New York Times, the Witte de With Cahiers, the Rotterdams Dagblad, Italian GQ, and Princeton Magazine. Robin has maintained an active portrait studio since 2003. In 2012, she was honored to be the exclusive campaign photographer for the Princeton fundraising event with First Lady Michelle Obama.



This project would not be possible without the support of Timothy M. Andrews, a longtime friend and supporter of the Arts Council of Princeton, who has generously underwritten the Anne Reeves Artist-in-Residence program for three years. The Arts Council also acknowledges the Princeton University Humanities Council and Princeton Future for their generous support.

UNTITLED 2017 (FEAR EATS THE SOUL) (WHITE FLAG)

 

The Arts Council of Princeton presents UNTITLED 2017 (FEAR EATS THE SOUL) (WHITE FLAG)  by Rirkrit Tiravanija

Tiravanija’s piece was created as part of Creative Time’s Pledges of Allegiance, a nationwide public art project that commissioned sixteen flags, each created by acclaimed contemporary artists. Each flag embodies art’s ability to channel political passion, points to an issue the artist is passionate about, and speaks to how we might move forward collectively as a country.

The message of Rirkrit Tiravanija’s flag is a reference to German filmmaker Rainer Werner Fassbinder’s film “Ali: Fear Eats the Soul” where the two lead characters struggle with, and ultimately confront, their own internal racism. 

Originally intended as a temporary installation during Black History Month, the Arts Council has decided to fly this flag once more as we witness the unjust racism towards Asian Americans across our country.

 

 

Sunday, April 18

A Voice to be Heard

A Voice to be Heard explores the idea of the inner voice and the ongoing search for meaning, connection, and sense of place. The artists explore ideas of belonging that seem truly important in our contemporary life and in a society that too often feels polarized and isolated, inviting us to reflect on our points of view and shared humanity.

 

Joyce Kozloff in her series “girlhood” visually collaborated with her younger self through using childhood drawings in her current work that reflect on her education, and perception of the world. She explains that through the work “A visual dialogue between my childhood and adulthood…my conventional grammar school innocence felt weirdly relevant-within our polarized society, where so many people hold onto fantasies about recovering an imaginary past.”

 

The role of story in shaping knowledge, assumptions, our own origins and political views, is similarly explored by Maria de Los Angeles, through the voice of the personal. She exposes the internalized dialogue and external narratives surrounding migration through humor, story, facts, and allegory. A deeply felt voice blends the political, personal, and the mythological together.

 

[caption id="attachment_28458" align="aligncenter" width="338"] Maria de Los Angeles[/caption]

Martha Tuttle turns her attention to the sublime, finding inspiration in the vast space of the west, its’ almost invisible processes and moments, and the relationship of her physicality to place reflected through process. She invites us to a different type of listening, a more physical and slow one. She explains, “I see these practices as allowing material variation, as well as touch (my own, a place’s, a process’s) to be recorded into material form…Looking towards the future, I would like my practice to center in the study of the potentially vital relationship between the noticed/touched/cared for object and growing a practice of tenderness to our external world.”

 

A search for connection is explored and question by Buket Savci in her paintings. She explains, “I explore abundance versus emotional craving. Observing both the loneliness and need for attention, accompanied with consumerism frenzy globally.” Perhaps this need for connection is amplified by how we share our lives through social media and the lives of those around us, ever so joyous.

[caption id="attachment_29065" align="aligncenter" width="600"] Buket Savci[/caption]

Adam Moss takes a quieter look at human connection through portraiture of friends and family considering the psychology of the self and implication of the gaze. His portraits are vulnerable, sympathetic, stylized, and convey a sense of alienation and mystery. The subject has an intense gaze joyously juxtaposed by delicate application, color and detail. He explains “I wanted to make portraits rooted in realism that were heavily influenced by the subjective eye.”

 

[caption id="attachment_28457" align="aligncenter" width="750"] Ryan Bonilla[/caption]

That need to collect memories of our experiences, is visible, in the work of Ryan Bonilla, who through photography captures the spontaneity of everyday life in his culture. His work represents the feeling, ambiance, and freedom of his lifestyle and captures the rawness and innocence lost in our age and society.

 

Shelter Serra similarly looks at society for its voice, the role of technology, and of production. Serra explains” by continually repeating the same structure, similarities and differences emerge-reflecting on our own individuality in a world of progress and chaos.”

 

Brooklyn Based artist, designer, filmmaker Frenel Morris creates lucid, intimate paintings capturing simulacrum in seemingly ordinary objects to deliver a vivid copy of reality.  

Taking Pause

Taking Pause is a documentary portrait project created by ACP Artist-in-Residence Robin Resch that asks people to reflect on what in their lives feels most essential. The project is on view in Princeton’s Dohm Alley from April-October 2021.

 

With what do we identify and connect most deeply? What truly matters to us, and why?   

 

This series seeks to create telling portraits of people through what is deeply meaningful to them. To make these portraits, photographer Resch ask each participant the same simple thought-provoking question: “what is irreplaceable to you?”

 

Each person is documented with two distinct portraits.  One of their physical self and another of their reflective self, through what they have chosen to share. It is a collaborative project as those who participate are more than passing subjects. In addition to sharing something of deep personal resonance, each participant also tells the story behind what they chose and engages others to take part in the project. 

 

Taking Pause combines photographs and stories in a visual and verbal narrative that explores the complexities and simplicities of what we value. The intent is to document the differences and commonalities of these choices while engaging the spectrum of American diversity and disconnections.

 

Work on this series began in early 2018 with a core group of participants from varying backgrounds. Between November 2018 and March 2019, Resch began to expand the project’s community and network exponentially by working with people across the United States, driving solo 10,553 miles from East to West along a southerly route that naturally evolved and was largely determined by the location of the contributors. Resch’s goal for this Princeton manifestation of her Taking Pause project is to capture as broad a spectrum of the local community as possible. 

 

“Our lives are so diverse and we’ve all been impacted in similar and yet differing ways,” says Resch. “To some degree, it has been equalizing. In other ways it’s been polarizing. How has it impacted us? Have our values changed? Would we answer the question ‘what is irreplaceable to you?’ differently today than a year ago?”  Her hope is to sow seeds for a conversation that may help heal in such a challenging time and that as a collaborative project, Taking Pause may help rebuild trust by addressing our fears and fostering communication and reflection.

 

Resch’s work with each participant culminates in two photos and their brief written text, creating a finished portrait set. Five portrait sets will be printed on vinyl banners and be displayed in Dohm Alley, located near the corner of Nassau and Witherspoon streets, from April to October 2021, as a public art display, free and open to the public.

 

Robin Resch is a Princeton-based photographer who lived in Italy, France, and the Netherlands until 1998. She left Europe to pursue her Master’s in Architecture at Princeton University, which she combined with advanced photographic studies with Emmet Gowin and Andrew Moore. Her architectural training informs her documentary photographic work as she is particularly interested in making images that are about and their personal environments as well as the impact on our collective environments. Her landscape photography, which is more abstract, seeks to explore our human experience of the natural environment.

 

Resch’s work has been exhibited at Princeton University’s Lucas Gallery, the Pringle Gallery in Philadelphia, Design Within Reach, Princeton Project Space, the Arts Council of Princeton, and the Nassau Club. Her photographs have been published in the New York Times, the Witte de With Cahiers, the Rotterdams Dagblad, Italian GQ, and Princeton Magazine. Robin has maintained an active portrait studio since 2003. In 2012, she was honored to be the exclusive campaign photographer for the Princeton fundraising event with First Lady Michelle Obama.



This project would not be possible without the support of Timothy M. Andrews, a longtime friend and supporter of the Arts Council of Princeton, who has generously underwritten the Anne Reeves Artist-in-Residence program for three years. The Arts Council also acknowledges the Princeton University Humanities Council and Princeton Future for their generous support.

UNTITLED 2017 (FEAR EATS THE SOUL) (WHITE FLAG)

 

The Arts Council of Princeton presents UNTITLED 2017 (FEAR EATS THE SOUL) (WHITE FLAG)  by Rirkrit Tiravanija

Tiravanija’s piece was created as part of Creative Time’s Pledges of Allegiance, a nationwide public art project that commissioned sixteen flags, each created by acclaimed contemporary artists. Each flag embodies art’s ability to channel political passion, points to an issue the artist is passionate about, and speaks to how we might move forward collectively as a country.

The message of Rirkrit Tiravanija’s flag is a reference to German filmmaker Rainer Werner Fassbinder’s film “Ali: Fear Eats the Soul” where the two lead characters struggle with, and ultimately confront, their own internal racism. 

Originally intended as a temporary installation during Black History Month, the Arts Council has decided to fly this flag once more as we witness the unjust racism towards Asian Americans across our country.

 

 

Monday, April 19

A Voice to be Heard

A Voice to be Heard explores the idea of the inner voice and the ongoing search for meaning, connection, and sense of place. The artists explore ideas of belonging that seem truly important in our contemporary life and in a society that too often feels polarized and isolated, inviting us to reflect on our points of view and shared humanity.

 

Joyce Kozloff in her series “girlhood” visually collaborated with her younger self through using childhood drawings in her current work that reflect on her education, and perception of the world. She explains that through the work “A visual dialogue between my childhood and adulthood…my conventional grammar school innocence felt weirdly relevant-within our polarized society, where so many people hold onto fantasies about recovering an imaginary past.”

 

The role of story in shaping knowledge, assumptions, our own origins and political views, is similarly explored by Maria de Los Angeles, through the voice of the personal. She exposes the internalized dialogue and external narratives surrounding migration through humor, story, facts, and allegory. A deeply felt voice blends the political, personal, and the mythological together.

 

[caption id="attachment_28458" align="aligncenter" width="338"] Maria de Los Angeles[/caption]

Martha Tuttle turns her attention to the sublime, finding inspiration in the vast space of the west, its’ almost invisible processes and moments, and the relationship of her physicality to place reflected through process. She invites us to a different type of listening, a more physical and slow one. She explains, “I see these practices as allowing material variation, as well as touch (my own, a place’s, a process’s) to be recorded into material form…Looking towards the future, I would like my practice to center in the study of the potentially vital relationship between the noticed/touched/cared for object and growing a practice of tenderness to our external world.”

 

A search for connection is explored and question by Buket Savci in her paintings. She explains, “I explore abundance versus emotional craving. Observing both the loneliness and need for attention, accompanied with consumerism frenzy globally.” Perhaps this need for connection is amplified by how we share our lives through social media and the lives of those around us, ever so joyous.

[caption id="attachment_29065" align="aligncenter" width="600"] Buket Savci[/caption]

Adam Moss takes a quieter look at human connection through portraiture of friends and family considering the psychology of the self and implication of the gaze. His portraits are vulnerable, sympathetic, stylized, and convey a sense of alienation and mystery. The subject has an intense gaze joyously juxtaposed by delicate application, color and detail. He explains “I wanted to make portraits rooted in realism that were heavily influenced by the subjective eye.”

 

[caption id="attachment_28457" align="aligncenter" width="750"] Ryan Bonilla[/caption]

That need to collect memories of our experiences, is visible, in the work of Ryan Bonilla, who through photography captures the spontaneity of everyday life in his culture. His work represents the feeling, ambiance, and freedom of his lifestyle and captures the rawness and innocence lost in our age and society.

 

Shelter Serra similarly looks at society for its voice, the role of technology, and of production. Serra explains” by continually repeating the same structure, similarities and differences emerge-reflecting on our own individuality in a world of progress and chaos.”

 

Brooklyn Based artist, designer, filmmaker Frenel Morris creates lucid, intimate paintings capturing simulacrum in seemingly ordinary objects to deliver a vivid copy of reality.  

Taking Pause

Taking Pause is a documentary portrait project created by ACP Artist-in-Residence Robin Resch that asks people to reflect on what in their lives feels most essential. The project is on view in Princeton’s Dohm Alley from April-October 2021.

 

With what do we identify and connect most deeply? What truly matters to us, and why?   

 

This series seeks to create telling portraits of people through what is deeply meaningful to them. To make these portraits, photographer Resch ask each participant the same simple thought-provoking question: “what is irreplaceable to you?”

 

Each person is documented with two distinct portraits.  One of their physical self and another of their reflective self, through what they have chosen to share. It is a collaborative project as those who participate are more than passing subjects. In addition to sharing something of deep personal resonance, each participant also tells the story behind what they chose and engages others to take part in the project. 

 

Taking Pause combines photographs and stories in a visual and verbal narrative that explores the complexities and simplicities of what we value. The intent is to document the differences and commonalities of these choices while engaging the spectrum of American diversity and disconnections.

 

Work on this series began in early 2018 with a core group of participants from varying backgrounds. Between November 2018 and March 2019, Resch began to expand the project’s community and network exponentially by working with people across the United States, driving solo 10,553 miles from East to West along a southerly route that naturally evolved and was largely determined by the location of the contributors. Resch’s goal for this Princeton manifestation of her Taking Pause project is to capture as broad a spectrum of the local community as possible. 

 

“Our lives are so diverse and we’ve all been impacted in similar and yet differing ways,” says Resch. “To some degree, it has been equalizing. In other ways it’s been polarizing. How has it impacted us? Have our values changed? Would we answer the question ‘what is irreplaceable to you?’ differently today than a year ago?”  Her hope is to sow seeds for a conversation that may help heal in such a challenging time and that as a collaborative project, Taking Pause may help rebuild trust by addressing our fears and fostering communication and reflection.

 

Resch’s work with each participant culminates in two photos and their brief written text, creating a finished portrait set. Five portrait sets will be printed on vinyl banners and be displayed in Dohm Alley, located near the corner of Nassau and Witherspoon streets, from April to October 2021, as a public art display, free and open to the public.

 

Robin Resch is a Princeton-based photographer who lived in Italy, France, and the Netherlands until 1998. She left Europe to pursue her Master’s in Architecture at Princeton University, which she combined with advanced photographic studies with Emmet Gowin and Andrew Moore. Her architectural training informs her documentary photographic work as she is particularly interested in making images that are about and their personal environments as well as the impact on our collective environments. Her landscape photography, which is more abstract, seeks to explore our human experience of the natural environment.

 

Resch’s work has been exhibited at Princeton University’s Lucas Gallery, the Pringle Gallery in Philadelphia, Design Within Reach, Princeton Project Space, the Arts Council of Princeton, and the Nassau Club. Her photographs have been published in the New York Times, the Witte de With Cahiers, the Rotterdams Dagblad, Italian GQ, and Princeton Magazine. Robin has maintained an active portrait studio since 2003. In 2012, she was honored to be the exclusive campaign photographer for the Princeton fundraising event with First Lady Michelle Obama.



This project would not be possible without the support of Timothy M. Andrews, a longtime friend and supporter of the Arts Council of Princeton, who has generously underwritten the Anne Reeves Artist-in-Residence program for three years. The Arts Council also acknowledges the Princeton University Humanities Council and Princeton Future for their generous support.

UNTITLED 2017 (FEAR EATS THE SOUL) (WHITE FLAG)

 

The Arts Council of Princeton presents UNTITLED 2017 (FEAR EATS THE SOUL) (WHITE FLAG)  by Rirkrit Tiravanija

Tiravanija’s piece was created as part of Creative Time’s Pledges of Allegiance, a nationwide public art project that commissioned sixteen flags, each created by acclaimed contemporary artists. Each flag embodies art’s ability to channel political passion, points to an issue the artist is passionate about, and speaks to how we might move forward collectively as a country.

The message of Rirkrit Tiravanija’s flag is a reference to German filmmaker Rainer Werner Fassbinder’s film “Ali: Fear Eats the Soul” where the two lead characters struggle with, and ultimately confront, their own internal racism. 

Originally intended as a temporary installation during Black History Month, the Arts Council has decided to fly this flag once more as we witness the unjust racism towards Asian Americans across our country.

 

 

Tuesday, April 20

A Voice to be Heard

A Voice to be Heard explores the idea of the inner voice and the ongoing search for meaning, connection, and sense of place. The artists explore ideas of belonging that seem truly important in our contemporary life and in a society that too often feels polarized and isolated, inviting us to reflect on our points of view and shared humanity.

 

Joyce Kozloff in her series “girlhood” visually collaborated with her younger self through using childhood drawings in her current work that reflect on her education, and perception of the world. She explains that through the work “A visual dialogue between my childhood and adulthood…my conventional grammar school innocence felt weirdly relevant-within our polarized society, where so many people hold onto fantasies about recovering an imaginary past.”

 

The role of story in shaping knowledge, assumptions, our own origins and political views, is similarly explored by Maria de Los Angeles, through the voice of the personal. She exposes the internalized dialogue and external narratives surrounding migration through humor, story, facts, and allegory. A deeply felt voice blends the political, personal, and the mythological together.

 

[caption id="attachment_28458" align="aligncenter" width="338"] Maria de Los Angeles[/caption]

Martha Tuttle turns her attention to the sublime, finding inspiration in the vast space of the west, its’ almost invisible processes and moments, and the relationship of her physicality to place reflected through process. She invites us to a different type of listening, a more physical and slow one. She explains, “I see these practices as allowing material variation, as well as touch (my own, a place’s, a process’s) to be recorded into material form…Looking towards the future, I would like my practice to center in the study of the potentially vital relationship between the noticed/touched/cared for object and growing a practice of tenderness to our external world.”

 

A search for connection is explored and question by Buket Savci in her paintings. She explains, “I explore abundance versus emotional craving. Observing both the loneliness and need for attention, accompanied with consumerism frenzy globally.” Perhaps this need for connection is amplified by how we share our lives through social media and the lives of those around us, ever so joyous.

[caption id="attachment_29065" align="aligncenter" width="600"] Buket Savci[/caption]

Adam Moss takes a quieter look at human connection through portraiture of friends and family considering the psychology of the self and implication of the gaze. His portraits are vulnerable, sympathetic, stylized, and convey a sense of alienation and mystery. The subject has an intense gaze joyously juxtaposed by delicate application, color and detail. He explains “I wanted to make portraits rooted in realism that were heavily influenced by the subjective eye.”

 

[caption id="attachment_28457" align="aligncenter" width="750"] Ryan Bonilla[/caption]

That need to collect memories of our experiences, is visible, in the work of Ryan Bonilla, who through photography captures the spontaneity of everyday life in his culture. His work represents the feeling, ambiance, and freedom of his lifestyle and captures the rawness and innocence lost in our age and society.

 

Shelter Serra similarly looks at society for its voice, the role of technology, and of production. Serra explains” by continually repeating the same structure, similarities and differences emerge-reflecting on our own individuality in a world of progress and chaos.”

 

Brooklyn Based artist, designer, filmmaker Frenel Morris creates lucid, intimate paintings capturing simulacrum in seemingly ordinary objects to deliver a vivid copy of reality.  

Taking Pause

Taking Pause is a documentary portrait project created by ACP Artist-in-Residence Robin Resch that asks people to reflect on what in their lives feels most essential. The project is on view in Princeton’s Dohm Alley from April-October 2021.

 

With what do we identify and connect most deeply? What truly matters to us, and why?   

 

This series seeks to create telling portraits of people through what is deeply meaningful to them. To make these portraits, photographer Resch ask each participant the same simple thought-provoking question: “what is irreplaceable to you?”

 

Each person is documented with two distinct portraits.  One of their physical self and another of their reflective self, through what they have chosen to share. It is a collaborative project as those who participate are more than passing subjects. In addition to sharing something of deep personal resonance, each participant also tells the story behind what they chose and engages others to take part in the project. 

 

Taking Pause combines photographs and stories in a visual and verbal narrative that explores the complexities and simplicities of what we value. The intent is to document the differences and commonalities of these choices while engaging the spectrum of American diversity and disconnections.

 

Work on this series began in early 2018 with a core group of participants from varying backgrounds. Between November 2018 and March 2019, Resch began to expand the project’s community and network exponentially by working with people across the United States, driving solo 10,553 miles from East to West along a southerly route that naturally evolved and was largely determined by the location of the contributors. Resch’s goal for this Princeton manifestation of her Taking Pause project is to capture as broad a spectrum of the local community as possible. 

 

“Our lives are so diverse and we’ve all been impacted in similar and yet differing ways,” says Resch. “To some degree, it has been equalizing. In other ways it’s been polarizing. How has it impacted us? Have our values changed? Would we answer the question ‘what is irreplaceable to you?’ differently today than a year ago?”  Her hope is to sow seeds for a conversation that may help heal in such a challenging time and that as a collaborative project, Taking Pause may help rebuild trust by addressing our fears and fostering communication and reflection.

 

Resch’s work with each participant culminates in two photos and their brief written text, creating a finished portrait set. Five portrait sets will be printed on vinyl banners and be displayed in Dohm Alley, located near the corner of Nassau and Witherspoon streets, from April to October 2021, as a public art display, free and open to the public.

 

Robin Resch is a Princeton-based photographer who lived in Italy, France, and the Netherlands until 1998. She left Europe to pursue her Master’s in Architecture at Princeton University, which she combined with advanced photographic studies with Emmet Gowin and Andrew Moore. Her architectural training informs her documentary photographic work as she is particularly interested in making images that are about and their personal environments as well as the impact on our collective environments. Her landscape photography, which is more abstract, seeks to explore our human experience of the natural environment.

 

Resch’s work has been exhibited at Princeton University’s Lucas Gallery, the Pringle Gallery in Philadelphia, Design Within Reach, Princeton Project Space, the Arts Council of Princeton, and the Nassau Club. Her photographs have been published in the New York Times, the Witte de With Cahiers, the Rotterdams Dagblad, Italian GQ, and Princeton Magazine. Robin has maintained an active portrait studio since 2003. In 2012, she was honored to be the exclusive campaign photographer for the Princeton fundraising event with First Lady Michelle Obama.



This project would not be possible without the support of Timothy M. Andrews, a longtime friend and supporter of the Arts Council of Princeton, who has generously underwritten the Anne Reeves Artist-in-Residence program for three years. The Arts Council also acknowledges the Princeton University Humanities Council and Princeton Future for their generous support.

UNTITLED 2017 (FEAR EATS THE SOUL) (WHITE FLAG)

 

The Arts Council of Princeton presents UNTITLED 2017 (FEAR EATS THE SOUL) (WHITE FLAG)  by Rirkrit Tiravanija

Tiravanija’s piece was created as part of Creative Time’s Pledges of Allegiance, a nationwide public art project that commissioned sixteen flags, each created by acclaimed contemporary artists. Each flag embodies art’s ability to channel political passion, points to an issue the artist is passionate about, and speaks to how we might move forward collectively as a country.

The message of Rirkrit Tiravanija’s flag is a reference to German filmmaker Rainer Werner Fassbinder’s film “Ali: Fear Eats the Soul” where the two lead characters struggle with, and ultimately confront, their own internal racism. 

Originally intended as a temporary installation during Black History Month, the Arts Council has decided to fly this flag once more as we witness the unjust racism towards Asian Americans across our country.

 

 

Wednesday, April 21

A Voice to be Heard

A Voice to be Heard explores the idea of the inner voice and the ongoing search for meaning, connection, and sense of place. The artists explore ideas of belonging that seem truly important in our contemporary life and in a society that too often feels polarized and isolated, inviting us to reflect on our points of view and shared humanity.

 

Joyce Kozloff in her series “girlhood” visually collaborated with her younger self through using childhood drawings in her current work that reflect on her education, and perception of the world. She explains that through the work “A visual dialogue between my childhood and adulthood…my conventional grammar school innocence felt weirdly relevant-within our polarized society, where so many people hold onto fantasies about recovering an imaginary past.”

 

The role of story in shaping knowledge, assumptions, our own origins and political views, is similarly explored by Maria de Los Angeles, through the voice of the personal. She exposes the internalized dialogue and external narratives surrounding migration through humor, story, facts, and allegory. A deeply felt voice blends the political, personal, and the mythological together.

 

[caption id="attachment_28458" align="aligncenter" width="338"] Maria de Los Angeles[/caption]

Martha Tuttle turns her attention to the sublime, finding inspiration in the vast space of the west, its’ almost invisible processes and moments, and the relationship of her physicality to place reflected through process. She invites us to a different type of listening, a more physical and slow one. She explains, “I see these practices as allowing material variation, as well as touch (my own, a place’s, a process’s) to be recorded into material form…Looking towards the future, I would like my practice to center in the study of the potentially vital relationship between the noticed/touched/cared for object and growing a practice of tenderness to our external world.”

 

A search for connection is explored and question by Buket Savci in her paintings. She explains, “I explore abundance versus emotional craving. Observing both the loneliness and need for attention, accompanied with consumerism frenzy globally.” Perhaps this need for connection is amplified by how we share our lives through social media and the lives of those around us, ever so joyous.

[caption id="attachment_29065" align="aligncenter" width="600"] Buket Savci[/caption]

Adam Moss takes a quieter look at human connection through portraiture of friends and family considering the psychology of the self and implication of the gaze. His portraits are vulnerable, sympathetic, stylized, and convey a sense of alienation and mystery. The subject has an intense gaze joyously juxtaposed by delicate application, color and detail. He explains “I wanted to make portraits rooted in realism that were heavily influenced by the subjective eye.”

 

[caption id="attachment_28457" align="aligncenter" width="750"] Ryan Bonilla[/caption]

That need to collect memories of our experiences, is visible, in the work of Ryan Bonilla, who through photography captures the spontaneity of everyday life in his culture. His work represents the feeling, ambiance, and freedom of his lifestyle and captures the rawness and innocence lost in our age and society.

 

Shelter Serra similarly looks at society for its voice, the role of technology, and of production. Serra explains” by continually repeating the same structure, similarities and differences emerge-reflecting on our own individuality in a world of progress and chaos.”

 

Brooklyn Based artist, designer, filmmaker Frenel Morris creates lucid, intimate paintings capturing simulacrum in seemingly ordinary objects to deliver a vivid copy of reality.  

Taking Pause

Taking Pause is a documentary portrait project created by ACP Artist-in-Residence Robin Resch that asks people to reflect on what in their lives feels most essential. The project is on view in Princeton’s Dohm Alley from April-October 2021.

 

With what do we identify and connect most deeply? What truly matters to us, and why?   

 

This series seeks to create telling portraits of people through what is deeply meaningful to them. To make these portraits, photographer Resch ask each participant the same simple thought-provoking question: “what is irreplaceable to you?”

 

Each person is documented with two distinct portraits.  One of their physical self and another of their reflective self, through what they have chosen to share. It is a collaborative project as those who participate are more than passing subjects. In addition to sharing something of deep personal resonance, each participant also tells the story behind what they chose and engages others to take part in the project. 

 

Taking Pause combines photographs and stories in a visual and verbal narrative that explores the complexities and simplicities of what we value. The intent is to document the differences and commonalities of these choices while engaging the spectrum of American diversity and disconnections.

 

Work on this series began in early 2018 with a core group of participants from varying backgrounds. Between November 2018 and March 2019, Resch began to expand the project’s community and network exponentially by working with people across the United States, driving solo 10,553 miles from East to West along a southerly route that naturally evolved and was largely determined by the location of the contributors. Resch’s goal for this Princeton manifestation of her Taking Pause project is to capture as broad a spectrum of the local community as possible. 

 

“Our lives are so diverse and we’ve all been impacted in similar and yet differing ways,” says Resch. “To some degree, it has been equalizing. In other ways it’s been polarizing. How has it impacted us? Have our values changed? Would we answer the question ‘what is irreplaceable to you?’ differently today than a year ago?”  Her hope is to sow seeds for a conversation that may help heal in such a challenging time and that as a collaborative project, Taking Pause may help rebuild trust by addressing our fears and fostering communication and reflection.

 

Resch’s work with each participant culminates in two photos and their brief written text, creating a finished portrait set. Five portrait sets will be printed on vinyl banners and be displayed in Dohm Alley, located near the corner of Nassau and Witherspoon streets, from April to October 2021, as a public art display, free and open to the public.

 

Robin Resch is a Princeton-based photographer who lived in Italy, France, and the Netherlands until 1998. She left Europe to pursue her Master’s in Architecture at Princeton University, which she combined with advanced photographic studies with Emmet Gowin and Andrew Moore. Her architectural training informs her documentary photographic work as she is particularly interested in making images that are about and their personal environments as well as the impact on our collective environments. Her landscape photography, which is more abstract, seeks to explore our human experience of the natural environment.

 

Resch’s work has been exhibited at Princeton University’s Lucas Gallery, the Pringle Gallery in Philadelphia, Design Within Reach, Princeton Project Space, the Arts Council of Princeton, and the Nassau Club. Her photographs have been published in the New York Times, the Witte de With Cahiers, the Rotterdams Dagblad, Italian GQ, and Princeton Magazine. Robin has maintained an active portrait studio since 2003. In 2012, she was honored to be the exclusive campaign photographer for the Princeton fundraising event with First Lady Michelle Obama.



This project would not be possible without the support of Timothy M. Andrews, a longtime friend and supporter of the Arts Council of Princeton, who has generously underwritten the Anne Reeves Artist-in-Residence program for three years. The Arts Council also acknowledges the Princeton University Humanities Council and Princeton Future for their generous support.

UNTITLED 2017 (FEAR EATS THE SOUL) (WHITE FLAG)

 

The Arts Council of Princeton presents UNTITLED 2017 (FEAR EATS THE SOUL) (WHITE FLAG)  by Rirkrit Tiravanija

Tiravanija’s piece was created as part of Creative Time’s Pledges of Allegiance, a nationwide public art project that commissioned sixteen flags, each created by acclaimed contemporary artists. Each flag embodies art’s ability to channel political passion, points to an issue the artist is passionate about, and speaks to how we might move forward collectively as a country.

The message of Rirkrit Tiravanija’s flag is a reference to German filmmaker Rainer Werner Fassbinder’s film “Ali: Fear Eats the Soul” where the two lead characters struggle with, and ultimately confront, their own internal racism. 

Originally intended as a temporary installation during Black History Month, the Arts Council has decided to fly this flag once more as we witness the unjust racism towards Asian Americans across our country.