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Friday, October 15

Story & Verse: A Storytelling and Poetic Open Mic - "After Midnight"

- Free and open to the public!

Enjoy an evening of community-created entertainment in the form of storytelling and poetic open mic. All are welcome to tell a well-prepared story or perform their poetry. Each month, we’ll be inviting inspiration from a well-known song title.  Artists are invited to interpret the theme as broadly as they wish. Performers should bring their own work, inspired by this month’s theme: After Midnight.

The evening will include 45 minutes of stories and 45 minutes of poetry with a brief intermission.

Doors: 7pm
Stories begin: 7:30pm

Performer Details

  • Performers will be randomly selected from names in a ‘hat’.
  • Storytellers should prepare a 5-minute story on the theme, true and about the teller. Storytellers should follow “The Moth” guidelines
  • Poets should perform their own poetry, up to 5 minutes in length, related to the theme.
  • Performers will be selected at random, so it’s possible that not everyone will get to perform.

FREE RSVP HERE

IT WAS NO DREAM · NO FUE UN SUEÑO

IT WAS NO DREAM · NO FUE UN SUEÑO

A group of high school students in New Jersey, stuck at home during the coronavirus pandemic, gathered virtually to read and discuss Franz Kafka’s Metamorphosis. The alchemy of the story, in which a young man wakes in his room as a monstrous insect, kicks off a conversation among this cohort of first- and second-generation immigrant teens.   
 
A short film documents the Futuro youth mentoring program at LALDEF, the Latin American Legal Defense and Education Fund.  We are grateful to all the participating students and educators and to ProCES, the Program in Community Engaged Scholarship at Princeton University and the Arts Council of Princeton. 
 

 
NO FUE UN SUEÑO · IT WAS NO DREAM
Un grupo de estudiantes en Nueva Jersey, en casa durante la pandemia de coronavirus, se reúnieron virtualmente para leer y discutir La Metamorfosis de Franz Kafka. La alquimia de la historia, en la que un joven se cambia en su habitación a un insecto monstruoso, empieza una conversación entre este cohorte de adolescentes de primera y segunda generación inmigrantes.

Este cortometraje documenta el Futuro programa de tutoría juvenil en LALDEF, el Fondo Latinoamericano para la Defensa Legal y la Educación. Agradecemos a todos los estudiantes y educadores y a ProCES, el Program in Community Engaged Scholarship en Princeton University y el Arts Council of Princeton

Taking Pause

[embed]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7eiuc3zG9NI[/embed]

Video courtesy of the Princeton University Humanities Council 

 

Taking Pause is a documentary portrait project created by ACP Artist-in-Residence Robin Resch that asks people to reflect on what in their lives feels most essential. The project is on view in Princeton’s Dohm Alley from April-October 2021.

 

With what do we identify and connect most deeply? What truly matters to us, and why?   

 

This series seeks to create telling portraits of people through what is deeply meaningful to them. To make these portraits, photographer Resch ask each participant the same simple thought-provoking question: “what is irreplaceable to you?”

 

Each person is documented with two distinct portraits.  One of their physical self and another of their reflective self, through what they have chosen to share. It is a collaborative project as those who participate are more than passing subjects. In addition to sharing something of deep personal resonance, each participant also tells the story behind what they chose and engages others to take part in the project. 

 

Taking Pause combines photographs and stories in a visual and verbal narrative that explores the complexities and simplicities of what we value. The intent is to document the differences and commonalities of these choices while engaging the spectrum of American diversity and disconnections.

 

Work on this series began in early 2018 with a core group of participants from varying backgrounds. Between November 2018 and March 2019, Resch began to expand the project’s community and network exponentially by working with people across the United States, driving solo 10,553 miles from East to West along a southerly route that naturally evolved and was largely determined by the location of the contributors. Resch’s goal for this Princeton manifestation of her Taking Pause project is to capture as broad a spectrum of the local community as possible. 

 

“Our lives are so diverse and we’ve all been impacted in similar and yet differing ways,” says Resch. “To some degree, it has been equalizing. In other ways it’s been polarizing. How has it impacted us? Have our values changed? Would we answer the question ‘what is irreplaceable to you?’ differently today than a year ago?”  Her hope is to sow seeds for a conversation that may help heal in such a challenging time and that as a collaborative project, Taking Pause may help rebuild trust by addressing our fears and fostering communication and reflection.

 

Resch’s work with each participant culminates in two photos and their brief written text, creating a finished portrait set. Five portrait sets will be printed on vinyl banners and be displayed in Dohm Alley, located near the corner of Nassau and Witherspoon streets, from April to October 2021, as a public art display, free and open to the public.

 

Robin Resch is a Princeton-based photographer who lived in Italy, France, and the Netherlands until 1998. She left Europe to pursue her Master’s in Architecture at Princeton University, which she combined with advanced photographic studies with Emmet Gowin and Andrew Moore. Her architectural training informs her documentary photographic work as she is particularly interested in making images that are about and their personal environments as well as the impact on our collective environments. Her landscape photography, which is more abstract, seeks to explore our human experience of the natural environment.

 

Resch’s work has been exhibited at Princeton University’s Lucas Gallery, the Pringle Gallery in Philadelphia, Design Within Reach, Princeton Project Space, the Arts Council of Princeton, and the Nassau Club. Her photographs have been published in the New York Times, the Witte de With Cahiers, the Rotterdams Dagblad, Italian GQ, and Princeton Magazine. Robin has maintained an active portrait studio since 2003. In 2012, she was honored to be the exclusive campaign photographer for the Princeton fundraising event with First Lady Michelle Obama.

Saturday, October 16

Day of the Dead Workshop: Papel Picado & Paper Flowers

- Free and open to the public!

Celebrate el Día de los Muertos with the Arts Council of Princeton! Join us for free outdoor workshops to learn about this culturally rich holiday and the traditional folk arts associated with Day of the Dead.

 

Papel picado, or the art of cutting paper banners, is a true talent in Mexico, traditionally done with chisels. We will make the festive tissue paper banners that flutter over every plaza, shop, and doorway during Day of the Dead. 

 

Flowers are also a large part of this holiday, gathered in bunches and placed at cemeteries. Learn how to make a bouquet of the brightly colored cempoalxochitl flowers the Arts Council has used to decorate our altar arch for our annual festival.

 

Not only will you learn a new folk art craft, but you’ll be invited to display your work in our Day of the Dead Exhibition in our Sands Lobby Gallery from November 6-20!

 

Ages 7+. Workshops will be led by Veronica Olivares Weber and ACP Artistic Director Maria Evans. 

 

Workshop is full. Registration is closed.

 


El Día de los Muertos is observed in Mexico and throughout the world this time of year, where family and friends gather to remember and honor those who have died. Traditions connected with the holiday include building private altars using sugar skulls, marigolds, and favorite foods of the deceased to celebrate their lives!

Additional Day of the Dead workshops:

  • October 9 — Mexican Tin Art
  • October 23 — Nichos & Calaveras
  • October 30 — Day of the Dead Workshop Sampler with Child & Caregiver

This series is generously supported by the Princeton University Program in Latin American Studies, the Global History Lab of Princeton University, Princeton University Department of Spanish and Portuguese, and Tacoria. Special thanks to community partner Cherry Grove Organic CSA.

Opening Reception: Talk to Me

- Free and open to the public!

Join the Arts Council of Princeton for the Opening Reception of Talk to Me by Katherine Parker and Janet Filomeno, a show about long friendships and the conversations between two artists.

This exhibition is an opportunity to show new work side by side: paintings rich in history and shared experience, reflecting a dialogue of faith, friendship and the possibilities of abstract painting.

Talk to Me is on view in the ACP’s Taplin Gallery from October 16 through November 20, 2021.

IT WAS NO DREAM · NO FUE UN SUEÑO

IT WAS NO DREAM · NO FUE UN SUEÑO

A group of high school students in New Jersey, stuck at home during the coronavirus pandemic, gathered virtually to read and discuss Franz Kafka’s Metamorphosis. The alchemy of the story, in which a young man wakes in his room as a monstrous insect, kicks off a conversation among this cohort of first- and second-generation immigrant teens.   
 
A short film documents the Futuro youth mentoring program at LALDEF, the Latin American Legal Defense and Education Fund.  We are grateful to all the participating students and educators and to ProCES, the Program in Community Engaged Scholarship at Princeton University and the Arts Council of Princeton. 
 

 
NO FUE UN SUEÑO · IT WAS NO DREAM
Un grupo de estudiantes en Nueva Jersey, en casa durante la pandemia de coronavirus, se reúnieron virtualmente para leer y discutir La Metamorfosis de Franz Kafka. La alquimia de la historia, en la que un joven se cambia en su habitación a un insecto monstruoso, empieza una conversación entre este cohorte de adolescentes de primera y segunda generación inmigrantes.

Este cortometraje documenta el Futuro programa de tutoría juvenil en LALDEF, el Fondo Latinoamericano para la Defensa Legal y la Educación. Agradecemos a todos los estudiantes y educadores y a ProCES, el Program in Community Engaged Scholarship en Princeton University y el Arts Council of Princeton

Taking Pause

[embed]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7eiuc3zG9NI[/embed]

Video courtesy of the Princeton University Humanities Council 

 

Taking Pause is a documentary portrait project created by ACP Artist-in-Residence Robin Resch that asks people to reflect on what in their lives feels most essential. The project is on view in Princeton’s Dohm Alley from April-October 2021.

 

With what do we identify and connect most deeply? What truly matters to us, and why?   

 

This series seeks to create telling portraits of people through what is deeply meaningful to them. To make these portraits, photographer Resch ask each participant the same simple thought-provoking question: “what is irreplaceable to you?”

 

Each person is documented with two distinct portraits.  One of their physical self and another of their reflective self, through what they have chosen to share. It is a collaborative project as those who participate are more than passing subjects. In addition to sharing something of deep personal resonance, each participant also tells the story behind what they chose and engages others to take part in the project. 

 

Taking Pause combines photographs and stories in a visual and verbal narrative that explores the complexities and simplicities of what we value. The intent is to document the differences and commonalities of these choices while engaging the spectrum of American diversity and disconnections.

 

Work on this series began in early 2018 with a core group of participants from varying backgrounds. Between November 2018 and March 2019, Resch began to expand the project’s community and network exponentially by working with people across the United States, driving solo 10,553 miles from East to West along a southerly route that naturally evolved and was largely determined by the location of the contributors. Resch’s goal for this Princeton manifestation of her Taking Pause project is to capture as broad a spectrum of the local community as possible. 

 

“Our lives are so diverse and we’ve all been impacted in similar and yet differing ways,” says Resch. “To some degree, it has been equalizing. In other ways it’s been polarizing. How has it impacted us? Have our values changed? Would we answer the question ‘what is irreplaceable to you?’ differently today than a year ago?”  Her hope is to sow seeds for a conversation that may help heal in such a challenging time and that as a collaborative project, Taking Pause may help rebuild trust by addressing our fears and fostering communication and reflection.

 

Resch’s work with each participant culminates in two photos and their brief written text, creating a finished portrait set. Five portrait sets will be printed on vinyl banners and be displayed in Dohm Alley, located near the corner of Nassau and Witherspoon streets, from April to October 2021, as a public art display, free and open to the public.

 

Robin Resch is a Princeton-based photographer who lived in Italy, France, and the Netherlands until 1998. She left Europe to pursue her Master’s in Architecture at Princeton University, which she combined with advanced photographic studies with Emmet Gowin and Andrew Moore. Her architectural training informs her documentary photographic work as she is particularly interested in making images that are about and their personal environments as well as the impact on our collective environments. Her landscape photography, which is more abstract, seeks to explore our human experience of the natural environment.

 

Resch’s work has been exhibited at Princeton University’s Lucas Gallery, the Pringle Gallery in Philadelphia, Design Within Reach, Princeton Project Space, the Arts Council of Princeton, and the Nassau Club. Her photographs have been published in the New York Times, the Witte de With Cahiers, the Rotterdams Dagblad, Italian GQ, and Princeton Magazine. Robin has maintained an active portrait studio since 2003. In 2012, she was honored to be the exclusive campaign photographer for the Princeton fundraising event with First Lady Michelle Obama.

Talk to Me

When artists are friends, they spend years even decades watching one another’s work change and grow. They talk together in studios, galleries, museums and cafes, discussing the intersection of life and art. These conversations are so important to artists, as a studio practice is quiet and sometimes lonely. The shorthand developed over years of conversation can ignite a body of work, deepen a theme, or reimagine an idea just beginning to take shape. It’s no surprise that such friendships have historically been so important to the development of new ideas and schools of thought.

 

Janet Filomeno and Katherine Parker met in Hoboken in 1991. They felt an immediate affinity as both were painters of large, expressionist works. Each were grappling with the challenges of finding new language to reinvent and personalize the ideas of abstract painting for their generation. A conversation started between the two friends that has continued over 25 plus years. Each woman has continued to paint and show extensively in the NY/ NJ area. The visits to the studio which have unfolded over the years have been an important touchstone for each, a means of trying out and sharing new work, of examining challenges. A trusted voice is paramount as this process takes place.

 

[caption id="attachment_31832" align="aligncenter" width="500"] Katherine Parker[/caption]

Katherine Parker‘s new works address the themes of memory, time and loss. The large painterly pieces are conceived slowly by adding layer after layer of thin oil paint, the forms and marks appearing and receding as the finished painting emerges. Parker has shown her work at MOMA/PS1, the Newark Museum, the Jersey City Museum, Spanierman Modern, Heidi Cho Gallery, Accola Littlejohn Gallery and many other venues in NY and NJ. She is the recipient of a Yaddo Fellowship, an Edward Albee Fellowship and NJ State Council for the Arts grant. She has lectured at many museums and universities in the area about her work.

 

[caption id="attachment_32237" align="aligncenter" width="640"] Janet Filomeno[/caption]

Janet Filomeno is best known for her large-scale gestural, abstract paintings that employ the use of a variety of materials such as ink, mica, shellac, acrylic paint, graphite, charcoal, paint markers, and at times, collage. By the use of her physical action such as pouring, flinging, and throwing colorful liquids onto the stretched canvas on the floor, she is able to reenact the movement one might sense in oceans, rivers, and other bodies of water. In an intuitive process she follows as she uses the physicality of her body to move/shift the canvas in various directions to create a heightened sense of movement as each layer is poured. As various forms and liquids collide together on the canvas one can experience the reference to water and all its associations in both a physical and metaphorical way. Bodies of water are a continuous theme that run throughout her many different series. Filomeno seeks visual metaphors and metaphysical connections to form a collective experience of the internal and external.

 

Filomeno has exhibited on both a national and international level. She has been included in many museum exhibits including The Trenton City Museum, The James A. Michener Museum, The Morris Museum, The Montclair Museum, and The Hunterdon and Paterson Museums. Internationally she has exhibited in Japan, China, Korea, Austria and Italy. 

 

In NYC she has exhibited in various galleries including the JCacciola and Walter Wickiser Gallery. In addition to her exhibition history she has taught and lectured at various museums and universities in the tri-state area. She has been an adjunct professor of art at Montclair State University (18 yrs), and William Paterson University. 

 

Born in New York, NY, Janet Filomeno lives and works in New Hope, PA. Currently her work is represented by the Walter Wickiser Gallery in NYC and Posner Fine Art in Los Angeles, CA. Her work is included in various museums, private and public collections.

 

 

This exhibition is an opportunity to show new work side by side: paintings rich in history and shared experience, reflecting a dialogue of faith, friendship and the possibilities of abstract painting. Talk to Me is a show about long friendships and the conversations between two artists.

Sunday, October 17

IT WAS NO DREAM · NO FUE UN SUEÑO

IT WAS NO DREAM · NO FUE UN SUEÑO

A group of high school students in New Jersey, stuck at home during the coronavirus pandemic, gathered virtually to read and discuss Franz Kafka’s Metamorphosis. The alchemy of the story, in which a young man wakes in his room as a monstrous insect, kicks off a conversation among this cohort of first- and second-generation immigrant teens.   
 
A short film documents the Futuro youth mentoring program at LALDEF, the Latin American Legal Defense and Education Fund.  We are grateful to all the participating students and educators and to ProCES, the Program in Community Engaged Scholarship at Princeton University and the Arts Council of Princeton. 
 

 
NO FUE UN SUEÑO · IT WAS NO DREAM
Un grupo de estudiantes en Nueva Jersey, en casa durante la pandemia de coronavirus, se reúnieron virtualmente para leer y discutir La Metamorfosis de Franz Kafka. La alquimia de la historia, en la que un joven se cambia en su habitación a un insecto monstruoso, empieza una conversación entre este cohorte de adolescentes de primera y segunda generación inmigrantes.

Este cortometraje documenta el Futuro programa de tutoría juvenil en LALDEF, el Fondo Latinoamericano para la Defensa Legal y la Educación. Agradecemos a todos los estudiantes y educadores y a ProCES, el Program in Community Engaged Scholarship en Princeton University y el Arts Council of Princeton

Talk to Me

When artists are friends, they spend years even decades watching one another’s work change and grow. They talk together in studios, galleries, museums and cafes, discussing the intersection of life and art. These conversations are so important to artists, as a studio practice is quiet and sometimes lonely. The shorthand developed over years of conversation can ignite a body of work, deepen a theme, or reimagine an idea just beginning to take shape. It’s no surprise that such friendships have historically been so important to the development of new ideas and schools of thought.

 

Janet Filomeno and Katherine Parker met in Hoboken in 1991. They felt an immediate affinity as both were painters of large, expressionist works. Each were grappling with the challenges of finding new language to reinvent and personalize the ideas of abstract painting for their generation. A conversation started between the two friends that has continued over 25 plus years. Each woman has continued to paint and show extensively in the NY/ NJ area. The visits to the studio which have unfolded over the years have been an important touchstone for each, a means of trying out and sharing new work, of examining challenges. A trusted voice is paramount as this process takes place.

 

[caption id="attachment_31832" align="aligncenter" width="500"] Katherine Parker[/caption]

Katherine Parker‘s new works address the themes of memory, time and loss. The large painterly pieces are conceived slowly by adding layer after layer of thin oil paint, the forms and marks appearing and receding as the finished painting emerges. Parker has shown her work at MOMA/PS1, the Newark Museum, the Jersey City Museum, Spanierman Modern, Heidi Cho Gallery, Accola Littlejohn Gallery and many other venues in NY and NJ. She is the recipient of a Yaddo Fellowship, an Edward Albee Fellowship and NJ State Council for the Arts grant. She has lectured at many museums and universities in the area about her work.

 

[caption id="attachment_32237" align="aligncenter" width="640"] Janet Filomeno[/caption]

Janet Filomeno is best known for her large-scale gestural, abstract paintings that employ the use of a variety of materials such as ink, mica, shellac, acrylic paint, graphite, charcoal, paint markers, and at times, collage. By the use of her physical action such as pouring, flinging, and throwing colorful liquids onto the stretched canvas on the floor, she is able to reenact the movement one might sense in oceans, rivers, and other bodies of water. In an intuitive process she follows as she uses the physicality of her body to move/shift the canvas in various directions to create a heightened sense of movement as each layer is poured. As various forms and liquids collide together on the canvas one can experience the reference to water and all its associations in both a physical and metaphorical way. Bodies of water are a continuous theme that run throughout her many different series. Filomeno seeks visual metaphors and metaphysical connections to form a collective experience of the internal and external.

 

Filomeno has exhibited on both a national and international level. She has been included in many museum exhibits including The Trenton City Museum, The James A. Michener Museum, The Morris Museum, The Montclair Museum, and The Hunterdon and Paterson Museums. Internationally she has exhibited in Japan, China, Korea, Austria and Italy. 

 

In NYC she has exhibited in various galleries including the JCacciola and Walter Wickiser Gallery. In addition to her exhibition history she has taught and lectured at various museums and universities in the tri-state area. She has been an adjunct professor of art at Montclair State University (18 yrs), and William Paterson University. 

 

Born in New York, NY, Janet Filomeno lives and works in New Hope, PA. Currently her work is represented by the Walter Wickiser Gallery in NYC and Posner Fine Art in Los Angeles, CA. Her work is included in various museums, private and public collections.

 

 

This exhibition is an opportunity to show new work side by side: paintings rich in history and shared experience, reflecting a dialogue of faith, friendship and the possibilities of abstract painting. Talk to Me is a show about long friendships and the conversations between two artists.

Monday, October 18

IT WAS NO DREAM · NO FUE UN SUEÑO

IT WAS NO DREAM · NO FUE UN SUEÑO

A group of high school students in New Jersey, stuck at home during the coronavirus pandemic, gathered virtually to read and discuss Franz Kafka’s Metamorphosis. The alchemy of the story, in which a young man wakes in his room as a monstrous insect, kicks off a conversation among this cohort of first- and second-generation immigrant teens.   
 
A short film documents the Futuro youth mentoring program at LALDEF, the Latin American Legal Defense and Education Fund.  We are grateful to all the participating students and educators and to ProCES, the Program in Community Engaged Scholarship at Princeton University and the Arts Council of Princeton. 
 

 
NO FUE UN SUEÑO · IT WAS NO DREAM
Un grupo de estudiantes en Nueva Jersey, en casa durante la pandemia de coronavirus, se reúnieron virtualmente para leer y discutir La Metamorfosis de Franz Kafka. La alquimia de la historia, en la que un joven se cambia en su habitación a un insecto monstruoso, empieza una conversación entre este cohorte de adolescentes de primera y segunda generación inmigrantes.

Este cortometraje documenta el Futuro programa de tutoría juvenil en LALDEF, el Fondo Latinoamericano para la Defensa Legal y la Educación. Agradecemos a todos los estudiantes y educadores y a ProCES, el Program in Community Engaged Scholarship en Princeton University y el Arts Council of Princeton

Talk to Me

When artists are friends, they spend years even decades watching one another’s work change and grow. They talk together in studios, galleries, museums and cafes, discussing the intersection of life and art. These conversations are so important to artists, as a studio practice is quiet and sometimes lonely. The shorthand developed over years of conversation can ignite a body of work, deepen a theme, or reimagine an idea just beginning to take shape. It’s no surprise that such friendships have historically been so important to the development of new ideas and schools of thought.

 

Janet Filomeno and Katherine Parker met in Hoboken in 1991. They felt an immediate affinity as both were painters of large, expressionist works. Each were grappling with the challenges of finding new language to reinvent and personalize the ideas of abstract painting for their generation. A conversation started between the two friends that has continued over 25 plus years. Each woman has continued to paint and show extensively in the NY/ NJ area. The visits to the studio which have unfolded over the years have been an important touchstone for each, a means of trying out and sharing new work, of examining challenges. A trusted voice is paramount as this process takes place.

 

[caption id="attachment_31832" align="aligncenter" width="500"] Katherine Parker[/caption]

Katherine Parker‘s new works address the themes of memory, time and loss. The large painterly pieces are conceived slowly by adding layer after layer of thin oil paint, the forms and marks appearing and receding as the finished painting emerges. Parker has shown her work at MOMA/PS1, the Newark Museum, the Jersey City Museum, Spanierman Modern, Heidi Cho Gallery, Accola Littlejohn Gallery and many other venues in NY and NJ. She is the recipient of a Yaddo Fellowship, an Edward Albee Fellowship and NJ State Council for the Arts grant. She has lectured at many museums and universities in the area about her work.

 

[caption id="attachment_32237" align="aligncenter" width="640"] Janet Filomeno[/caption]

Janet Filomeno is best known for her large-scale gestural, abstract paintings that employ the use of a variety of materials such as ink, mica, shellac, acrylic paint, graphite, charcoal, paint markers, and at times, collage. By the use of her physical action such as pouring, flinging, and throwing colorful liquids onto the stretched canvas on the floor, she is able to reenact the movement one might sense in oceans, rivers, and other bodies of water. In an intuitive process she follows as she uses the physicality of her body to move/shift the canvas in various directions to create a heightened sense of movement as each layer is poured. As various forms and liquids collide together on the canvas one can experience the reference to water and all its associations in both a physical and metaphorical way. Bodies of water are a continuous theme that run throughout her many different series. Filomeno seeks visual metaphors and metaphysical connections to form a collective experience of the internal and external.

 

Filomeno has exhibited on both a national and international level. She has been included in many museum exhibits including The Trenton City Museum, The James A. Michener Museum, The Morris Museum, The Montclair Museum, and The Hunterdon and Paterson Museums. Internationally she has exhibited in Japan, China, Korea, Austria and Italy. 

 

In NYC she has exhibited in various galleries including the JCacciola and Walter Wickiser Gallery. In addition to her exhibition history she has taught and lectured at various museums and universities in the tri-state area. She has been an adjunct professor of art at Montclair State University (18 yrs), and William Paterson University. 

 

Born in New York, NY, Janet Filomeno lives and works in New Hope, PA. Currently her work is represented by the Walter Wickiser Gallery in NYC and Posner Fine Art in Los Angeles, CA. Her work is included in various museums, private and public collections.

 

 

This exhibition is an opportunity to show new work side by side: paintings rich in history and shared experience, reflecting a dialogue of faith, friendship and the possibilities of abstract painting. Talk to Me is a show about long friendships and the conversations between two artists.

Tuesday, October 19

IT WAS NO DREAM · NO FUE UN SUEÑO

IT WAS NO DREAM · NO FUE UN SUEÑO

A group of high school students in New Jersey, stuck at home during the coronavirus pandemic, gathered virtually to read and discuss Franz Kafka’s Metamorphosis. The alchemy of the story, in which a young man wakes in his room as a monstrous insect, kicks off a conversation among this cohort of first- and second-generation immigrant teens.   
 
A short film documents the Futuro youth mentoring program at LALDEF, the Latin American Legal Defense and Education Fund.  We are grateful to all the participating students and educators and to ProCES, the Program in Community Engaged Scholarship at Princeton University and the Arts Council of Princeton. 
 

 
NO FUE UN SUEÑO · IT WAS NO DREAM
Un grupo de estudiantes en Nueva Jersey, en casa durante la pandemia de coronavirus, se reúnieron virtualmente para leer y discutir La Metamorfosis de Franz Kafka. La alquimia de la historia, en la que un joven se cambia en su habitación a un insecto monstruoso, empieza una conversación entre este cohorte de adolescentes de primera y segunda generación inmigrantes.

Este cortometraje documenta el Futuro programa de tutoría juvenil en LALDEF, el Fondo Latinoamericano para la Defensa Legal y la Educación. Agradecemos a todos los estudiantes y educadores y a ProCES, el Program in Community Engaged Scholarship en Princeton University y el Arts Council of Princeton

Talk to Me

When artists are friends, they spend years even decades watching one another’s work change and grow. They talk together in studios, galleries, museums and cafes, discussing the intersection of life and art. These conversations are so important to artists, as a studio practice is quiet and sometimes lonely. The shorthand developed over years of conversation can ignite a body of work, deepen a theme, or reimagine an idea just beginning to take shape. It’s no surprise that such friendships have historically been so important to the development of new ideas and schools of thought.

 

Janet Filomeno and Katherine Parker met in Hoboken in 1991. They felt an immediate affinity as both were painters of large, expressionist works. Each were grappling with the challenges of finding new language to reinvent and personalize the ideas of abstract painting for their generation. A conversation started between the two friends that has continued over 25 plus years. Each woman has continued to paint and show extensively in the NY/ NJ area. The visits to the studio which have unfolded over the years have been an important touchstone for each, a means of trying out and sharing new work, of examining challenges. A trusted voice is paramount as this process takes place.

 

[caption id="attachment_31832" align="aligncenter" width="500"] Katherine Parker[/caption]

Katherine Parker‘s new works address the themes of memory, time and loss. The large painterly pieces are conceived slowly by adding layer after layer of thin oil paint, the forms and marks appearing and receding as the finished painting emerges. Parker has shown her work at MOMA/PS1, the Newark Museum, the Jersey City Museum, Spanierman Modern, Heidi Cho Gallery, Accola Littlejohn Gallery and many other venues in NY and NJ. She is the recipient of a Yaddo Fellowship, an Edward Albee Fellowship and NJ State Council for the Arts grant. She has lectured at many museums and universities in the area about her work.

 

[caption id="attachment_32237" align="aligncenter" width="640"] Janet Filomeno[/caption]

Janet Filomeno is best known for her large-scale gestural, abstract paintings that employ the use of a variety of materials such as ink, mica, shellac, acrylic paint, graphite, charcoal, paint markers, and at times, collage. By the use of her physical action such as pouring, flinging, and throwing colorful liquids onto the stretched canvas on the floor, she is able to reenact the movement one might sense in oceans, rivers, and other bodies of water. In an intuitive process she follows as she uses the physicality of her body to move/shift the canvas in various directions to create a heightened sense of movement as each layer is poured. As various forms and liquids collide together on the canvas one can experience the reference to water and all its associations in both a physical and metaphorical way. Bodies of water are a continuous theme that run throughout her many different series. Filomeno seeks visual metaphors and metaphysical connections to form a collective experience of the internal and external.

 

Filomeno has exhibited on both a national and international level. She has been included in many museum exhibits including The Trenton City Museum, The James A. Michener Museum, The Morris Museum, The Montclair Museum, and The Hunterdon and Paterson Museums. Internationally she has exhibited in Japan, China, Korea, Austria and Italy. 

 

In NYC she has exhibited in various galleries including the JCacciola and Walter Wickiser Gallery. In addition to her exhibition history she has taught and lectured at various museums and universities in the tri-state area. She has been an adjunct professor of art at Montclair State University (18 yrs), and William Paterson University. 

 

Born in New York, NY, Janet Filomeno lives and works in New Hope, PA. Currently her work is represented by the Walter Wickiser Gallery in NYC and Posner Fine Art in Los Angeles, CA. Her work is included in various museums, private and public collections.

 

 

This exhibition is an opportunity to show new work side by side: paintings rich in history and shared experience, reflecting a dialogue of faith, friendship and the possibilities of abstract painting. Talk to Me is a show about long friendships and the conversations between two artists.

Wednesday, October 20

IT WAS NO DREAM · NO FUE UN SUEÑO

IT WAS NO DREAM · NO FUE UN SUEÑO

A group of high school students in New Jersey, stuck at home during the coronavirus pandemic, gathered virtually to read and discuss Franz Kafka’s Metamorphosis. The alchemy of the story, in which a young man wakes in his room as a monstrous insect, kicks off a conversation among this cohort of first- and second-generation immigrant teens.   
 
A short film documents the Futuro youth mentoring program at LALDEF, the Latin American Legal Defense and Education Fund.  We are grateful to all the participating students and educators and to ProCES, the Program in Community Engaged Scholarship at Princeton University and the Arts Council of Princeton. 
 

 
NO FUE UN SUEÑO · IT WAS NO DREAM
Un grupo de estudiantes en Nueva Jersey, en casa durante la pandemia de coronavirus, se reúnieron virtualmente para leer y discutir La Metamorfosis de Franz Kafka. La alquimia de la historia, en la que un joven se cambia en su habitación a un insecto monstruoso, empieza una conversación entre este cohorte de adolescentes de primera y segunda generación inmigrantes.

Este cortometraje documenta el Futuro programa de tutoría juvenil en LALDEF, el Fondo Latinoamericano para la Defensa Legal y la Educación. Agradecemos a todos los estudiantes y educadores y a ProCES, el Program in Community Engaged Scholarship en Princeton University y el Arts Council of Princeton

Talk to Me

When artists are friends, they spend years even decades watching one another’s work change and grow. They talk together in studios, galleries, museums and cafes, discussing the intersection of life and art. These conversations are so important to artists, as a studio practice is quiet and sometimes lonely. The shorthand developed over years of conversation can ignite a body of work, deepen a theme, or reimagine an idea just beginning to take shape. It’s no surprise that such friendships have historically been so important to the development of new ideas and schools of thought.

 

Janet Filomeno and Katherine Parker met in Hoboken in 1991. They felt an immediate affinity as both were painters of large, expressionist works. Each were grappling with the challenges of finding new language to reinvent and personalize the ideas of abstract painting for their generation. A conversation started between the two friends that has continued over 25 plus years. Each woman has continued to paint and show extensively in the NY/ NJ area. The visits to the studio which have unfolded over the years have been an important touchstone for each, a means of trying out and sharing new work, of examining challenges. A trusted voice is paramount as this process takes place.

 

[caption id="attachment_31832" align="aligncenter" width="500"] Katherine Parker[/caption]

Katherine Parker‘s new works address the themes of memory, time and loss. The large painterly pieces are conceived slowly by adding layer after layer of thin oil paint, the forms and marks appearing and receding as the finished painting emerges. Parker has shown her work at MOMA/PS1, the Newark Museum, the Jersey City Museum, Spanierman Modern, Heidi Cho Gallery, Accola Littlejohn Gallery and many other venues in NY and NJ. She is the recipient of a Yaddo Fellowship, an Edward Albee Fellowship and NJ State Council for the Arts grant. She has lectured at many museums and universities in the area about her work.

 

[caption id="attachment_32237" align="aligncenter" width="640"] Janet Filomeno[/caption]

Janet Filomeno is best known for her large-scale gestural, abstract paintings that employ the use of a variety of materials such as ink, mica, shellac, acrylic paint, graphite, charcoal, paint markers, and at times, collage. By the use of her physical action such as pouring, flinging, and throwing colorful liquids onto the stretched canvas on the floor, she is able to reenact the movement one might sense in oceans, rivers, and other bodies of water. In an intuitive process she follows as she uses the physicality of her body to move/shift the canvas in various directions to create a heightened sense of movement as each layer is poured. As various forms and liquids collide together on the canvas one can experience the reference to water and all its associations in both a physical and metaphorical way. Bodies of water are a continuous theme that run throughout her many different series. Filomeno seeks visual metaphors and metaphysical connections to form a collective experience of the internal and external.

 

Filomeno has exhibited on both a national and international level. She has been included in many museum exhibits including The Trenton City Museum, The James A. Michener Museum, The Morris Museum, The Montclair Museum, and The Hunterdon and Paterson Museums. Internationally she has exhibited in Japan, China, Korea, Austria and Italy. 

 

In NYC she has exhibited in various galleries including the JCacciola and Walter Wickiser Gallery. In addition to her exhibition history she has taught and lectured at various museums and universities in the tri-state area. She has been an adjunct professor of art at Montclair State University (18 yrs), and William Paterson University. 

 

Born in New York, NY, Janet Filomeno lives and works in New Hope, PA. Currently her work is represented by the Walter Wickiser Gallery in NYC and Posner Fine Art in Los Angeles, CA. Her work is included in various museums, private and public collections.

 

 

This exhibition is an opportunity to show new work side by side: paintings rich in history and shared experience, reflecting a dialogue of faith, friendship and the possibilities of abstract painting. Talk to Me is a show about long friendships and the conversations between two artists.

Thursday, October 21

IT WAS NO DREAM · NO FUE UN SUEÑO

IT WAS NO DREAM · NO FUE UN SUEÑO

A group of high school students in New Jersey, stuck at home during the coronavirus pandemic, gathered virtually to read and discuss Franz Kafka’s Metamorphosis. The alchemy of the story, in which a young man wakes in his room as a monstrous insect, kicks off a conversation among this cohort of first- and second-generation immigrant teens.   
 
A short film documents the Futuro youth mentoring program at LALDEF, the Latin American Legal Defense and Education Fund.  We are grateful to all the participating students and educators and to ProCES, the Program in Community Engaged Scholarship at Princeton University and the Arts Council of Princeton. 
 

 
NO FUE UN SUEÑO · IT WAS NO DREAM
Un grupo de estudiantes en Nueva Jersey, en casa durante la pandemia de coronavirus, se reúnieron virtualmente para leer y discutir La Metamorfosis de Franz Kafka. La alquimia de la historia, en la que un joven se cambia en su habitación a un insecto monstruoso, empieza una conversación entre este cohorte de adolescentes de primera y segunda generación inmigrantes.

Este cortometraje documenta el Futuro programa de tutoría juvenil en LALDEF, el Fondo Latinoamericano para la Defensa Legal y la Educación. Agradecemos a todos los estudiantes y educadores y a ProCES, el Program in Community Engaged Scholarship en Princeton University y el Arts Council of Princeton

Talk to Me

When artists are friends, they spend years even decades watching one another’s work change and grow. They talk together in studios, galleries, museums and cafes, discussing the intersection of life and art. These conversations are so important to artists, as a studio practice is quiet and sometimes lonely. The shorthand developed over years of conversation can ignite a body of work, deepen a theme, or reimagine an idea just beginning to take shape. It’s no surprise that such friendships have historically been so important to the development of new ideas and schools of thought.

 

Janet Filomeno and Katherine Parker met in Hoboken in 1991. They felt an immediate affinity as both were painters of large, expressionist works. Each were grappling with the challenges of finding new language to reinvent and personalize the ideas of abstract painting for their generation. A conversation started between the two friends that has continued over 25 plus years. Each woman has continued to paint and show extensively in the NY/ NJ area. The visits to the studio which have unfolded over the years have been an important touchstone for each, a means of trying out and sharing new work, of examining challenges. A trusted voice is paramount as this process takes place.

 

[caption id="attachment_31832" align="aligncenter" width="500"] Katherine Parker[/caption]

Katherine Parker‘s new works address the themes of memory, time and loss. The large painterly pieces are conceived slowly by adding layer after layer of thin oil paint, the forms and marks appearing and receding as the finished painting emerges. Parker has shown her work at MOMA/PS1, the Newark Museum, the Jersey City Museum, Spanierman Modern, Heidi Cho Gallery, Accola Littlejohn Gallery and many other venues in NY and NJ. She is the recipient of a Yaddo Fellowship, an Edward Albee Fellowship and NJ State Council for the Arts grant. She has lectured at many museums and universities in the area about her work.

 

[caption id="attachment_32237" align="aligncenter" width="640"] Janet Filomeno[/caption]

Janet Filomeno is best known for her large-scale gestural, abstract paintings that employ the use of a variety of materials such as ink, mica, shellac, acrylic paint, graphite, charcoal, paint markers, and at times, collage. By the use of her physical action such as pouring, flinging, and throwing colorful liquids onto the stretched canvas on the floor, she is able to reenact the movement one might sense in oceans, rivers, and other bodies of water. In an intuitive process she follows as she uses the physicality of her body to move/shift the canvas in various directions to create a heightened sense of movement as each layer is poured. As various forms and liquids collide together on the canvas one can experience the reference to water and all its associations in both a physical and metaphorical way. Bodies of water are a continuous theme that run throughout her many different series. Filomeno seeks visual metaphors and metaphysical connections to form a collective experience of the internal and external.

 

Filomeno has exhibited on both a national and international level. She has been included in many museum exhibits including The Trenton City Museum, The James A. Michener Museum, The Morris Museum, The Montclair Museum, and The Hunterdon and Paterson Museums. Internationally she has exhibited in Japan, China, Korea, Austria and Italy. 

 

In NYC she has exhibited in various galleries including the JCacciola and Walter Wickiser Gallery. In addition to her exhibition history she has taught and lectured at various museums and universities in the tri-state area. She has been an adjunct professor of art at Montclair State University (18 yrs), and William Paterson University. 

 

Born in New York, NY, Janet Filomeno lives and works in New Hope, PA. Currently her work is represented by the Walter Wickiser Gallery in NYC and Posner Fine Art in Los Angeles, CA. Her work is included in various museums, private and public collections.

 

 

This exhibition is an opportunity to show new work side by side: paintings rich in history and shared experience, reflecting a dialogue of faith, friendship and the possibilities of abstract painting. Talk to Me is a show about long friendships and the conversations between two artists.