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Saturday, October 23

Day of the Dead Workshop: Nichos & Calaveras

- Free and open to the public!

Celebrate el Día de los Muertos with the Arts Council of Princeton! Join us for free outdoor workshops to learn about this culturally rich holiday and the traditional folk arts associated with Day of the Dead.

 

A nicho box, or simply ‘nicho’, is a three-dimensional box used as a small, portable shrine to an important figure or loved one. Create your own contemporary Día de los Muertos nicho using whimsical accents, collage, paint, glitter, and other embellishments. Participants are encouraged to make the nicho their own by bringing old photos, trinkets, or artwork along with them. 

 

Jose Guadalupe Posada was a Mexican lithographer who created Mexico’s most famous calavera, La Calavera Catrina, for posters, prints and other images. Catrina has become a beloved figure and iconic symbol of Day of the Dead. Learn the history behind skulls and skeletons as a representative image for Day of the Dead and embellish not only your own Catrina, but additional skeleton and skull projects.

 

Not only will you learn a new folk art craft, but you’ll be invited to display your work in our Day of the Dead Exhibition in our Sands Lobby Gallery from November 6-20!

 

Ages 7+. Workshops will be led by Veronica Olivares Weber and ACP Artistic Director Maria Evans. 

 

Workshop is full. Registration is closed.

 


El Día de los Muertos is observed in Mexico and throughout the world this time of year, where family and friends gather to remember and honor those who have died. Traditions connected with the holiday include building private altars using sugar skulls, marigolds, and favorite foods of the deceased to celebrate their lives!

Additional Day of the Dead workshops:

  • October 9 — Mexican Tin Art
  • October 16 — Papel Picado & Paper Flowers
  • October 30 — Day of the Dead Workshop Sampler with Child & Caregiver

This series is generously supported by the Princeton University Program in Latin American Studies, the Global History Lab of Princeton University, Princeton University Department of Spanish and Portuguese, and Tacoria. Special thanks to community partner Cherry Grove Organic CSA.

Pop Up Beer Garden with Old Hights Brewing Co.

- $85
[caption id="attachment_32119" align="aligncenter" width="837"] .[/caption]
The Arts Council of Princeton has partnered with Old Hights Brewing Company to bring a pop-up beer garden right to Downtown Princeton! Old Hights’ balanced, hand-crafted beers are derived from the finest, locally sourced ingredients. Sip unlimited brews from a custom handmade ceramic beer stein, enjoy live local tunes by Dan Kassel, and spend an afternoon in a celebration of community.
Making the event even more special, the ACP was chosen by Old Hights as a “Donation Beer”, meaning that they have developed, brewed, and named a beer after yours truly!
Sales support the Arts Council Outreach Programs and Scholarship Fund, making inspiring arts experiences accessible to all, regardless of means
[caption id="attachment_32116" align="aligncenter" width="300"] .[/caption]

Café Improv

- $1 ACP Members; $2 General Admission

For the past 25 years, Café Improv has connected beginning and professional performers in the Arts Council of Princeton’s Solley Theater. Attendees can expect an evening of exciting local music, poetry, comedy, and more. Café Improv is easily accessible to the public through affordable admission rates of $1 for ACP Members and $2 General Admission. Click here to learn more and/or register to play!

 

IT WAS NO DREAM · NO FUE UN SUEÑO

IT WAS NO DREAM · NO FUE UN SUEÑO

A group of high school students in New Jersey, stuck at home during the coronavirus pandemic, gathered virtually to read and discuss Franz Kafka’s Metamorphosis. The alchemy of the story, in which a young man wakes in his room as a monstrous insect, kicks off a conversation among this cohort of first- and second-generation immigrant teens.   
 
A short film documents the Futuro youth mentoring program at LALDEF, the Latin American Legal Defense and Education Fund.  We are grateful to all the participating students and educators and to ProCES, the Program in Community Engaged Scholarship at Princeton University and the Arts Council of Princeton. 
 

 
NO FUE UN SUEÑO · IT WAS NO DREAM
Un grupo de estudiantes en Nueva Jersey, en casa durante la pandemia de coronavirus, se reúnieron virtualmente para leer y discutir La Metamorfosis de Franz Kafka. La alquimia de la historia, en la que un joven se cambia en su habitación a un insecto monstruoso, empieza una conversación entre este cohorte de adolescentes de primera y segunda generación inmigrantes.

Este cortometraje documenta el Futuro programa de tutoría juvenil en LALDEF, el Fondo Latinoamericano para la Defensa Legal y la Educación. Agradecemos a todos los estudiantes y educadores y a ProCES, el Program in Community Engaged Scholarship en Princeton University y el Arts Council of Princeton

Talk to Me

When artists are friends, they spend years even decades watching one another’s work change and grow. They talk together in studios, galleries, museums and cafes, discussing the intersection of life and art. These conversations are so important to artists, as a studio practice is quiet and sometimes lonely. The shorthand developed over years of conversation can ignite a body of work, deepen a theme, or reimagine an idea just beginning to take shape. It’s no surprise that such friendships have historically been so important to the development of new ideas and schools of thought.

 

Janet Filomeno and Katherine Parker met in Hoboken in 1991. They felt an immediate affinity as both were painters of large, expressionist works. Each were grappling with the challenges of finding new language to reinvent and personalize the ideas of abstract painting for their generation. A conversation started between the two friends that has continued over 25 plus years. Each woman has continued to paint and show extensively in the NY/ NJ area. The visits to the studio which have unfolded over the years have been an important touchstone for each, a means of trying out and sharing new work, of examining challenges. A trusted voice is paramount as this process takes place.

 

[caption id="attachment_31832" align="aligncenter" width="500"] Katherine Parker[/caption]

Katherine Parker‘s new works address the themes of memory, time and loss. The large painterly pieces are conceived slowly by adding layer after layer of thin oil paint, the forms and marks appearing and receding as the finished painting emerges. Parker has shown her work at MOMA/PS1, the Newark Museum, the Jersey City Museum, Spanierman Modern, Heidi Cho Gallery, Accola Littlejohn Gallery and many other venues in NY and NJ. She is the recipient of a Yaddo Fellowship, an Edward Albee Fellowship and NJ State Council for the Arts grant. She has lectured at many museums and universities in the area about her work.

 

[caption id="attachment_32237" align="aligncenter" width="640"] Janet Filomeno[/caption]

Janet Filomeno is best known for her large-scale gestural, abstract paintings that employ the use of a variety of materials such as ink, mica, shellac, acrylic paint, graphite, charcoal, paint markers, and at times, collage. By the use of her physical action such as pouring, flinging, and throwing colorful liquids onto the stretched canvas on the floor, she is able to reenact the movement one might sense in oceans, rivers, and other bodies of water. In an intuitive process she follows as she uses the physicality of her body to move/shift the canvas in various directions to create a heightened sense of movement as each layer is poured. As various forms and liquids collide together on the canvas one can experience the reference to water and all its associations in both a physical and metaphorical way. Bodies of water are a continuous theme that run throughout her many different series. Filomeno seeks visual metaphors and metaphysical connections to form a collective experience of the internal and external.

 

Filomeno has exhibited on both a national and international level. She has been included in many museum exhibits including The Trenton City Museum, The James A. Michener Museum, The Morris Museum, The Montclair Museum, and The Hunterdon and Paterson Museums. Internationally she has exhibited in Japan, China, Korea, Austria and Italy. 

 

In NYC she has exhibited in various galleries including the JCacciola and Walter Wickiser Gallery. In addition to her exhibition history she has taught and lectured at various museums and universities in the tri-state area. She has been an adjunct professor of art at Montclair State University (18 yrs), and William Paterson University. 

 

Born in New York, NY, Janet Filomeno lives and works in New Hope, PA. Currently her work is represented by the Walter Wickiser Gallery in NYC and Posner Fine Art in Los Angeles, CA. Her work is included in various museums, private and public collections.

 

 

This exhibition is an opportunity to show new work side by side: paintings rich in history and shared experience, reflecting a dialogue of faith, friendship and the possibilities of abstract painting. Talk to Me is a show about long friendships and the conversations between two artists.

Sunday, October 24

IT WAS NO DREAM · NO FUE UN SUEÑO

IT WAS NO DREAM · NO FUE UN SUEÑO

A group of high school students in New Jersey, stuck at home during the coronavirus pandemic, gathered virtually to read and discuss Franz Kafka’s Metamorphosis. The alchemy of the story, in which a young man wakes in his room as a monstrous insect, kicks off a conversation among this cohort of first- and second-generation immigrant teens.   
 
A short film documents the Futuro youth mentoring program at LALDEF, the Latin American Legal Defense and Education Fund.  We are grateful to all the participating students and educators and to ProCES, the Program in Community Engaged Scholarship at Princeton University and the Arts Council of Princeton. 
 

 
NO FUE UN SUEÑO · IT WAS NO DREAM
Un grupo de estudiantes en Nueva Jersey, en casa durante la pandemia de coronavirus, se reúnieron virtualmente para leer y discutir La Metamorfosis de Franz Kafka. La alquimia de la historia, en la que un joven se cambia en su habitación a un insecto monstruoso, empieza una conversación entre este cohorte de adolescentes de primera y segunda generación inmigrantes.

Este cortometraje documenta el Futuro programa de tutoría juvenil en LALDEF, el Fondo Latinoamericano para la Defensa Legal y la Educación. Agradecemos a todos los estudiantes y educadores y a ProCES, el Program in Community Engaged Scholarship en Princeton University y el Arts Council of Princeton

Talk to Me

When artists are friends, they spend years even decades watching one another’s work change and grow. They talk together in studios, galleries, museums and cafes, discussing the intersection of life and art. These conversations are so important to artists, as a studio practice is quiet and sometimes lonely. The shorthand developed over years of conversation can ignite a body of work, deepen a theme, or reimagine an idea just beginning to take shape. It’s no surprise that such friendships have historically been so important to the development of new ideas and schools of thought.

 

Janet Filomeno and Katherine Parker met in Hoboken in 1991. They felt an immediate affinity as both were painters of large, expressionist works. Each were grappling with the challenges of finding new language to reinvent and personalize the ideas of abstract painting for their generation. A conversation started between the two friends that has continued over 25 plus years. Each woman has continued to paint and show extensively in the NY/ NJ area. The visits to the studio which have unfolded over the years have been an important touchstone for each, a means of trying out and sharing new work, of examining challenges. A trusted voice is paramount as this process takes place.

 

[caption id="attachment_31832" align="aligncenter" width="500"] Katherine Parker[/caption]

Katherine Parker‘s new works address the themes of memory, time and loss. The large painterly pieces are conceived slowly by adding layer after layer of thin oil paint, the forms and marks appearing and receding as the finished painting emerges. Parker has shown her work at MOMA/PS1, the Newark Museum, the Jersey City Museum, Spanierman Modern, Heidi Cho Gallery, Accola Littlejohn Gallery and many other venues in NY and NJ. She is the recipient of a Yaddo Fellowship, an Edward Albee Fellowship and NJ State Council for the Arts grant. She has lectured at many museums and universities in the area about her work.

 

[caption id="attachment_32237" align="aligncenter" width="640"] Janet Filomeno[/caption]

Janet Filomeno is best known for her large-scale gestural, abstract paintings that employ the use of a variety of materials such as ink, mica, shellac, acrylic paint, graphite, charcoal, paint markers, and at times, collage. By the use of her physical action such as pouring, flinging, and throwing colorful liquids onto the stretched canvas on the floor, she is able to reenact the movement one might sense in oceans, rivers, and other bodies of water. In an intuitive process she follows as she uses the physicality of her body to move/shift the canvas in various directions to create a heightened sense of movement as each layer is poured. As various forms and liquids collide together on the canvas one can experience the reference to water and all its associations in both a physical and metaphorical way. Bodies of water are a continuous theme that run throughout her many different series. Filomeno seeks visual metaphors and metaphysical connections to form a collective experience of the internal and external.

 

Filomeno has exhibited on both a national and international level. She has been included in many museum exhibits including The Trenton City Museum, The James A. Michener Museum, The Morris Museum, The Montclair Museum, and The Hunterdon and Paterson Museums. Internationally she has exhibited in Japan, China, Korea, Austria and Italy. 

 

In NYC she has exhibited in various galleries including the JCacciola and Walter Wickiser Gallery. In addition to her exhibition history she has taught and lectured at various museums and universities in the tri-state area. She has been an adjunct professor of art at Montclair State University (18 yrs), and William Paterson University. 

 

Born in New York, NY, Janet Filomeno lives and works in New Hope, PA. Currently her work is represented by the Walter Wickiser Gallery in NYC and Posner Fine Art in Los Angeles, CA. Her work is included in various museums, private and public collections.

 

 

This exhibition is an opportunity to show new work side by side: paintings rich in history and shared experience, reflecting a dialogue of faith, friendship and the possibilities of abstract painting. Talk to Me is a show about long friendships and the conversations between two artists.

Monday, October 25

IT WAS NO DREAM · NO FUE UN SUEÑO

IT WAS NO DREAM · NO FUE UN SUEÑO

A group of high school students in New Jersey, stuck at home during the coronavirus pandemic, gathered virtually to read and discuss Franz Kafka’s Metamorphosis. The alchemy of the story, in which a young man wakes in his room as a monstrous insect, kicks off a conversation among this cohort of first- and second-generation immigrant teens.   
 
A short film documents the Futuro youth mentoring program at LALDEF, the Latin American Legal Defense and Education Fund.  We are grateful to all the participating students and educators and to ProCES, the Program in Community Engaged Scholarship at Princeton University and the Arts Council of Princeton. 
 

 
NO FUE UN SUEÑO · IT WAS NO DREAM
Un grupo de estudiantes en Nueva Jersey, en casa durante la pandemia de coronavirus, se reúnieron virtualmente para leer y discutir La Metamorfosis de Franz Kafka. La alquimia de la historia, en la que un joven se cambia en su habitación a un insecto monstruoso, empieza una conversación entre este cohorte de adolescentes de primera y segunda generación inmigrantes.

Este cortometraje documenta el Futuro programa de tutoría juvenil en LALDEF, el Fondo Latinoamericano para la Defensa Legal y la Educación. Agradecemos a todos los estudiantes y educadores y a ProCES, el Program in Community Engaged Scholarship en Princeton University y el Arts Council of Princeton

Talk to Me

When artists are friends, they spend years even decades watching one another’s work change and grow. They talk together in studios, galleries, museums and cafes, discussing the intersection of life and art. These conversations are so important to artists, as a studio practice is quiet and sometimes lonely. The shorthand developed over years of conversation can ignite a body of work, deepen a theme, or reimagine an idea just beginning to take shape. It’s no surprise that such friendships have historically been so important to the development of new ideas and schools of thought.

 

Janet Filomeno and Katherine Parker met in Hoboken in 1991. They felt an immediate affinity as both were painters of large, expressionist works. Each were grappling with the challenges of finding new language to reinvent and personalize the ideas of abstract painting for their generation. A conversation started between the two friends that has continued over 25 plus years. Each woman has continued to paint and show extensively in the NY/ NJ area. The visits to the studio which have unfolded over the years have been an important touchstone for each, a means of trying out and sharing new work, of examining challenges. A trusted voice is paramount as this process takes place.

 

[caption id="attachment_31832" align="aligncenter" width="500"] Katherine Parker[/caption]

Katherine Parker‘s new works address the themes of memory, time and loss. The large painterly pieces are conceived slowly by adding layer after layer of thin oil paint, the forms and marks appearing and receding as the finished painting emerges. Parker has shown her work at MOMA/PS1, the Newark Museum, the Jersey City Museum, Spanierman Modern, Heidi Cho Gallery, Accola Littlejohn Gallery and many other venues in NY and NJ. She is the recipient of a Yaddo Fellowship, an Edward Albee Fellowship and NJ State Council for the Arts grant. She has lectured at many museums and universities in the area about her work.

 

[caption id="attachment_32237" align="aligncenter" width="640"] Janet Filomeno[/caption]

Janet Filomeno is best known for her large-scale gestural, abstract paintings that employ the use of a variety of materials such as ink, mica, shellac, acrylic paint, graphite, charcoal, paint markers, and at times, collage. By the use of her physical action such as pouring, flinging, and throwing colorful liquids onto the stretched canvas on the floor, she is able to reenact the movement one might sense in oceans, rivers, and other bodies of water. In an intuitive process she follows as she uses the physicality of her body to move/shift the canvas in various directions to create a heightened sense of movement as each layer is poured. As various forms and liquids collide together on the canvas one can experience the reference to water and all its associations in both a physical and metaphorical way. Bodies of water are a continuous theme that run throughout her many different series. Filomeno seeks visual metaphors and metaphysical connections to form a collective experience of the internal and external.

 

Filomeno has exhibited on both a national and international level. She has been included in many museum exhibits including The Trenton City Museum, The James A. Michener Museum, The Morris Museum, The Montclair Museum, and The Hunterdon and Paterson Museums. Internationally she has exhibited in Japan, China, Korea, Austria and Italy. 

 

In NYC she has exhibited in various galleries including the JCacciola and Walter Wickiser Gallery. In addition to her exhibition history she has taught and lectured at various museums and universities in the tri-state area. She has been an adjunct professor of art at Montclair State University (18 yrs), and William Paterson University. 

 

Born in New York, NY, Janet Filomeno lives and works in New Hope, PA. Currently her work is represented by the Walter Wickiser Gallery in NYC and Posner Fine Art in Los Angeles, CA. Her work is included in various museums, private and public collections.

 

 

This exhibition is an opportunity to show new work side by side: paintings rich in history and shared experience, reflecting a dialogue of faith, friendship and the possibilities of abstract painting. Talk to Me is a show about long friendships and the conversations between two artists.

Tuesday, October 26

IT WAS NO DREAM · NO FUE UN SUEÑO

IT WAS NO DREAM · NO FUE UN SUEÑO

A group of high school students in New Jersey, stuck at home during the coronavirus pandemic, gathered virtually to read and discuss Franz Kafka’s Metamorphosis. The alchemy of the story, in which a young man wakes in his room as a monstrous insect, kicks off a conversation among this cohort of first- and second-generation immigrant teens.   
 
A short film documents the Futuro youth mentoring program at LALDEF, the Latin American Legal Defense and Education Fund.  We are grateful to all the participating students and educators and to ProCES, the Program in Community Engaged Scholarship at Princeton University and the Arts Council of Princeton. 
 

 
NO FUE UN SUEÑO · IT WAS NO DREAM
Un grupo de estudiantes en Nueva Jersey, en casa durante la pandemia de coronavirus, se reúnieron virtualmente para leer y discutir La Metamorfosis de Franz Kafka. La alquimia de la historia, en la que un joven se cambia en su habitación a un insecto monstruoso, empieza una conversación entre este cohorte de adolescentes de primera y segunda generación inmigrantes.

Este cortometraje documenta el Futuro programa de tutoría juvenil en LALDEF, el Fondo Latinoamericano para la Defensa Legal y la Educación. Agradecemos a todos los estudiantes y educadores y a ProCES, el Program in Community Engaged Scholarship en Princeton University y el Arts Council of Princeton

Talk to Me

When artists are friends, they spend years even decades watching one another’s work change and grow. They talk together in studios, galleries, museums and cafes, discussing the intersection of life and art. These conversations are so important to artists, as a studio practice is quiet and sometimes lonely. The shorthand developed over years of conversation can ignite a body of work, deepen a theme, or reimagine an idea just beginning to take shape. It’s no surprise that such friendships have historically been so important to the development of new ideas and schools of thought.

 

Janet Filomeno and Katherine Parker met in Hoboken in 1991. They felt an immediate affinity as both were painters of large, expressionist works. Each were grappling with the challenges of finding new language to reinvent and personalize the ideas of abstract painting for their generation. A conversation started between the two friends that has continued over 25 plus years. Each woman has continued to paint and show extensively in the NY/ NJ area. The visits to the studio which have unfolded over the years have been an important touchstone for each, a means of trying out and sharing new work, of examining challenges. A trusted voice is paramount as this process takes place.

 

[caption id="attachment_31832" align="aligncenter" width="500"] Katherine Parker[/caption]

Katherine Parker‘s new works address the themes of memory, time and loss. The large painterly pieces are conceived slowly by adding layer after layer of thin oil paint, the forms and marks appearing and receding as the finished painting emerges. Parker has shown her work at MOMA/PS1, the Newark Museum, the Jersey City Museum, Spanierman Modern, Heidi Cho Gallery, Accola Littlejohn Gallery and many other venues in NY and NJ. She is the recipient of a Yaddo Fellowship, an Edward Albee Fellowship and NJ State Council for the Arts grant. She has lectured at many museums and universities in the area about her work.

 

[caption id="attachment_32237" align="aligncenter" width="640"] Janet Filomeno[/caption]

Janet Filomeno is best known for her large-scale gestural, abstract paintings that employ the use of a variety of materials such as ink, mica, shellac, acrylic paint, graphite, charcoal, paint markers, and at times, collage. By the use of her physical action such as pouring, flinging, and throwing colorful liquids onto the stretched canvas on the floor, she is able to reenact the movement one might sense in oceans, rivers, and other bodies of water. In an intuitive process she follows as she uses the physicality of her body to move/shift the canvas in various directions to create a heightened sense of movement as each layer is poured. As various forms and liquids collide together on the canvas one can experience the reference to water and all its associations in both a physical and metaphorical way. Bodies of water are a continuous theme that run throughout her many different series. Filomeno seeks visual metaphors and metaphysical connections to form a collective experience of the internal and external.

 

Filomeno has exhibited on both a national and international level. She has been included in many museum exhibits including The Trenton City Museum, The James A. Michener Museum, The Morris Museum, The Montclair Museum, and The Hunterdon and Paterson Museums. Internationally she has exhibited in Japan, China, Korea, Austria and Italy. 

 

In NYC she has exhibited in various galleries including the JCacciola and Walter Wickiser Gallery. In addition to her exhibition history she has taught and lectured at various museums and universities in the tri-state area. She has been an adjunct professor of art at Montclair State University (18 yrs), and William Paterson University. 

 

Born in New York, NY, Janet Filomeno lives and works in New Hope, PA. Currently her work is represented by the Walter Wickiser Gallery in NYC and Posner Fine Art in Los Angeles, CA. Her work is included in various museums, private and public collections.

 

 

This exhibition is an opportunity to show new work side by side: paintings rich in history and shared experience, reflecting a dialogue of faith, friendship and the possibilities of abstract painting. Talk to Me is a show about long friendships and the conversations between two artists.

Wednesday, October 27

IT WAS NO DREAM · NO FUE UN SUEÑO

IT WAS NO DREAM · NO FUE UN SUEÑO

A group of high school students in New Jersey, stuck at home during the coronavirus pandemic, gathered virtually to read and discuss Franz Kafka’s Metamorphosis. The alchemy of the story, in which a young man wakes in his room as a monstrous insect, kicks off a conversation among this cohort of first- and second-generation immigrant teens.   
 
A short film documents the Futuro youth mentoring program at LALDEF, the Latin American Legal Defense and Education Fund.  We are grateful to all the participating students and educators and to ProCES, the Program in Community Engaged Scholarship at Princeton University and the Arts Council of Princeton. 
 

 
NO FUE UN SUEÑO · IT WAS NO DREAM
Un grupo de estudiantes en Nueva Jersey, en casa durante la pandemia de coronavirus, se reúnieron virtualmente para leer y discutir La Metamorfosis de Franz Kafka. La alquimia de la historia, en la que un joven se cambia en su habitación a un insecto monstruoso, empieza una conversación entre este cohorte de adolescentes de primera y segunda generación inmigrantes.

Este cortometraje documenta el Futuro programa de tutoría juvenil en LALDEF, el Fondo Latinoamericano para la Defensa Legal y la Educación. Agradecemos a todos los estudiantes y educadores y a ProCES, el Program in Community Engaged Scholarship en Princeton University y el Arts Council of Princeton

Talk to Me

When artists are friends, they spend years even decades watching one another’s work change and grow. They talk together in studios, galleries, museums and cafes, discussing the intersection of life and art. These conversations are so important to artists, as a studio practice is quiet and sometimes lonely. The shorthand developed over years of conversation can ignite a body of work, deepen a theme, or reimagine an idea just beginning to take shape. It’s no surprise that such friendships have historically been so important to the development of new ideas and schools of thought.

 

Janet Filomeno and Katherine Parker met in Hoboken in 1991. They felt an immediate affinity as both were painters of large, expressionist works. Each were grappling with the challenges of finding new language to reinvent and personalize the ideas of abstract painting for their generation. A conversation started between the two friends that has continued over 25 plus years. Each woman has continued to paint and show extensively in the NY/ NJ area. The visits to the studio which have unfolded over the years have been an important touchstone for each, a means of trying out and sharing new work, of examining challenges. A trusted voice is paramount as this process takes place.

 

[caption id="attachment_31832" align="aligncenter" width="500"] Katherine Parker[/caption]

Katherine Parker‘s new works address the themes of memory, time and loss. The large painterly pieces are conceived slowly by adding layer after layer of thin oil paint, the forms and marks appearing and receding as the finished painting emerges. Parker has shown her work at MOMA/PS1, the Newark Museum, the Jersey City Museum, Spanierman Modern, Heidi Cho Gallery, Accola Littlejohn Gallery and many other venues in NY and NJ. She is the recipient of a Yaddo Fellowship, an Edward Albee Fellowship and NJ State Council for the Arts grant. She has lectured at many museums and universities in the area about her work.

 

[caption id="attachment_32237" align="aligncenter" width="640"] Janet Filomeno[/caption]

Janet Filomeno is best known for her large-scale gestural, abstract paintings that employ the use of a variety of materials such as ink, mica, shellac, acrylic paint, graphite, charcoal, paint markers, and at times, collage. By the use of her physical action such as pouring, flinging, and throwing colorful liquids onto the stretched canvas on the floor, she is able to reenact the movement one might sense in oceans, rivers, and other bodies of water. In an intuitive process she follows as she uses the physicality of her body to move/shift the canvas in various directions to create a heightened sense of movement as each layer is poured. As various forms and liquids collide together on the canvas one can experience the reference to water and all its associations in both a physical and metaphorical way. Bodies of water are a continuous theme that run throughout her many different series. Filomeno seeks visual metaphors and metaphysical connections to form a collective experience of the internal and external.

 

Filomeno has exhibited on both a national and international level. She has been included in many museum exhibits including The Trenton City Museum, The James A. Michener Museum, The Morris Museum, The Montclair Museum, and The Hunterdon and Paterson Museums. Internationally she has exhibited in Japan, China, Korea, Austria and Italy. 

 

In NYC she has exhibited in various galleries including the JCacciola and Walter Wickiser Gallery. In addition to her exhibition history she has taught and lectured at various museums and universities in the tri-state area. She has been an adjunct professor of art at Montclair State University (18 yrs), and William Paterson University. 

 

Born in New York, NY, Janet Filomeno lives and works in New Hope, PA. Currently her work is represented by the Walter Wickiser Gallery in NYC and Posner Fine Art in Los Angeles, CA. Her work is included in various museums, private and public collections.

 

 

This exhibition is an opportunity to show new work side by side: paintings rich in history and shared experience, reflecting a dialogue of faith, friendship and the possibilities of abstract painting. Talk to Me is a show about long friendships and the conversations between two artists.

Thursday, October 28

SUGAR SKULL! Watch Party with McCarter Theatre

- Free and open to the public!

 

[caption id="attachment_31955" align="aligncenter" width="500"] .[/caption]

 

The Arts Council teams up with McCarter Theatre to celebrate el Día de los Muertos with an in-person, family-friendly screening of the virtual online theater experience SUGAR SKULL! A Virtual Día de Muertos Adventure.

 

SUGAR SKULL! is a joyous, heartfelt, colorful, and captivating bilingual/bicultural adventure that delves into the rich, tuneful traditions of the Day of the Dead and features a company of gifted musicians and dancers. This delightful 30-minute virtual theater performance is appropriate for ages 3+. The screening will be followed by a brief community conversation with all gathered about the experience of the performance and what was most exciting and meaningful about its story.

 

This event is held in conjunction with a series of free community workshops featuring the traditional arts and craft of Day of the Dead. Learn more here!

Registration is closed. 

 

This series is generously supported by the Princeton University Program in Latin American Studies, the Global History Lab of Princeton University, Princeton University Department of Spanish and Portuguese, Penn Medicine Princeton Health, and Tacoria. Special thanks to community partner Cherry Grove Organic CSA.

Virtual Art-Making with the Princeton University Art Museum: Exploring Color in Pastel

- Free!

The Arts Council is partnering with the Princeton University Art Museum to provide free, live, online art-making experiences.

Weekly classes are taught by artist-instructor Barbara DiLorenzo over Zoom. With an emphasis on using soft pastels to blend and create rich colors, each week’s lesson will be inspired by works in the Museum’s collections.

This live art-making class is inspired by Sol LeWitt’s Wall Drawing #1134, Whirls and Twirls (Princeton). As you pass through the Bloomberg Arch of Bloomberg Hall, be sure to look up: there you’ll find Sol LeWitt’s vivid painting. In the late 1960s, LeWitt pioneered a new way of working: inspired by the tradition of mural painting, he began to create drawings and paintings for walls, all of them abstract. They combine a variety of relatively simple marks and geometric motifs to create aesthetic effects that are both dynamic and beautiful. Whirls and Twirls is especially playful for LeWitt, and its interlocking bands of color, which form a larger series of interconnected shapes, suggest exchange, movement, traffic, and the transmission of energy. In this class we will focus on color harmony using an abstract structure of crisscrossing and swirling lines on a page—filling each shape with specific hues. 

Free registration via Zoom here(when prompted, click to sign in as “attendee”)

This event will include live closed captions in both English and Spanish. English captions are available directly in the Zoom toolbar by clicking the “CC” icon. To access Spanish-language captioning, open Streamtext, where you can select “Spanish” to see the live captioning.

Para acceder a los subtítulos en varios idiomas, ingrese al seminario web de Zoom durante un evento en vivo, luego abra un navegador web separado para visitar esta página donde puede seleccionar “español” o el idioma de su elección.

LATE THURSDAYS! This event is part of the Museum’s Late Thursdays programming, made possible in part by Heather and Paul G. Haaga Jr., Class of 1970. Additional support for this program has been provided by the New Jersey State Council on the Arts, a partner agency of the National Endowment for the Arts, and the Curtis W. McGraw Foundation.

Photos: Sol LeWitt (1928–2007; born Hartford, CT; died New York, NY), Wall Drawing #1134, Whirls and Twirls (Princeton), 2004. Acrylic paint, 518.2 x 1127.8 cm. Princeton University, gift of the Bloomberg Family

IT WAS NO DREAM · NO FUE UN SUEÑO

IT WAS NO DREAM · NO FUE UN SUEÑO

A group of high school students in New Jersey, stuck at home during the coronavirus pandemic, gathered virtually to read and discuss Franz Kafka’s Metamorphosis. The alchemy of the story, in which a young man wakes in his room as a monstrous insect, kicks off a conversation among this cohort of first- and second-generation immigrant teens.   
 
A short film documents the Futuro youth mentoring program at LALDEF, the Latin American Legal Defense and Education Fund.  We are grateful to all the participating students and educators and to ProCES, the Program in Community Engaged Scholarship at Princeton University and the Arts Council of Princeton. 
 

 
NO FUE UN SUEÑO · IT WAS NO DREAM
Un grupo de estudiantes en Nueva Jersey, en casa durante la pandemia de coronavirus, se reúnieron virtualmente para leer y discutir La Metamorfosis de Franz Kafka. La alquimia de la historia, en la que un joven se cambia en su habitación a un insecto monstruoso, empieza una conversación entre este cohorte de adolescentes de primera y segunda generación inmigrantes.

Este cortometraje documenta el Futuro programa de tutoría juvenil en LALDEF, el Fondo Latinoamericano para la Defensa Legal y la Educación. Agradecemos a todos los estudiantes y educadores y a ProCES, el Program in Community Engaged Scholarship en Princeton University y el Arts Council of Princeton

Talk to Me

When artists are friends, they spend years even decades watching one another’s work change and grow. They talk together in studios, galleries, museums and cafes, discussing the intersection of life and art. These conversations are so important to artists, as a studio practice is quiet and sometimes lonely. The shorthand developed over years of conversation can ignite a body of work, deepen a theme, or reimagine an idea just beginning to take shape. It’s no surprise that such friendships have historically been so important to the development of new ideas and schools of thought.

 

Janet Filomeno and Katherine Parker met in Hoboken in 1991. They felt an immediate affinity as both were painters of large, expressionist works. Each were grappling with the challenges of finding new language to reinvent and personalize the ideas of abstract painting for their generation. A conversation started between the two friends that has continued over 25 plus years. Each woman has continued to paint and show extensively in the NY/ NJ area. The visits to the studio which have unfolded over the years have been an important touchstone for each, a means of trying out and sharing new work, of examining challenges. A trusted voice is paramount as this process takes place.

 

[caption id="attachment_31832" align="aligncenter" width="500"] Katherine Parker[/caption]

Katherine Parker‘s new works address the themes of memory, time and loss. The large painterly pieces are conceived slowly by adding layer after layer of thin oil paint, the forms and marks appearing and receding as the finished painting emerges. Parker has shown her work at MOMA/PS1, the Newark Museum, the Jersey City Museum, Spanierman Modern, Heidi Cho Gallery, Accola Littlejohn Gallery and many other venues in NY and NJ. She is the recipient of a Yaddo Fellowship, an Edward Albee Fellowship and NJ State Council for the Arts grant. She has lectured at many museums and universities in the area about her work.

 

[caption id="attachment_32237" align="aligncenter" width="640"] Janet Filomeno[/caption]

Janet Filomeno is best known for her large-scale gestural, abstract paintings that employ the use of a variety of materials such as ink, mica, shellac, acrylic paint, graphite, charcoal, paint markers, and at times, collage. By the use of her physical action such as pouring, flinging, and throwing colorful liquids onto the stretched canvas on the floor, she is able to reenact the movement one might sense in oceans, rivers, and other bodies of water. In an intuitive process she follows as she uses the physicality of her body to move/shift the canvas in various directions to create a heightened sense of movement as each layer is poured. As various forms and liquids collide together on the canvas one can experience the reference to water and all its associations in both a physical and metaphorical way. Bodies of water are a continuous theme that run throughout her many different series. Filomeno seeks visual metaphors and metaphysical connections to form a collective experience of the internal and external.

 

Filomeno has exhibited on both a national and international level. She has been included in many museum exhibits including The Trenton City Museum, The James A. Michener Museum, The Morris Museum, The Montclair Museum, and The Hunterdon and Paterson Museums. Internationally she has exhibited in Japan, China, Korea, Austria and Italy. 

 

In NYC she has exhibited in various galleries including the JCacciola and Walter Wickiser Gallery. In addition to her exhibition history she has taught and lectured at various museums and universities in the tri-state area. She has been an adjunct professor of art at Montclair State University (18 yrs), and William Paterson University. 

 

Born in New York, NY, Janet Filomeno lives and works in New Hope, PA. Currently her work is represented by the Walter Wickiser Gallery in NYC and Posner Fine Art in Los Angeles, CA. Her work is included in various museums, private and public collections.

 

 

This exhibition is an opportunity to show new work side by side: paintings rich in history and shared experience, reflecting a dialogue of faith, friendship and the possibilities of abstract painting. Talk to Me is a show about long friendships and the conversations between two artists.

Friday, October 29

CANCELLED: Hometown Halloween Parade 2021

- Free and open to the public!
[caption id="attachment_32544" align="aligncenter" width="600"] .[/caption]

Due to the anticipated forecast, the Hometown Halloween has been cancelled. We apologize for any inconvenience and look forward to seeing you in your costumes next year. Enjoy a safe and Happy Halloween!


Dress up in your best costume (and mask!) and join the Arts Council of Princeton for the Annual Hometown Halloween Parade!

Join us in Palmer Square at 5:15pm before we depart promptly at 5:45pm and make our way through Downtown Princeton. The parade will culminate at the Princeton Family YMCA where the festivities continue with music, trunk or treat, and more!

IT WAS NO DREAM · NO FUE UN SUEÑO

IT WAS NO DREAM · NO FUE UN SUEÑO

A group of high school students in New Jersey, stuck at home during the coronavirus pandemic, gathered virtually to read and discuss Franz Kafka’s Metamorphosis. The alchemy of the story, in which a young man wakes in his room as a monstrous insect, kicks off a conversation among this cohort of first- and second-generation immigrant teens.   
 
A short film documents the Futuro youth mentoring program at LALDEF, the Latin American Legal Defense and Education Fund.  We are grateful to all the participating students and educators and to ProCES, the Program in Community Engaged Scholarship at Princeton University and the Arts Council of Princeton. 
 

 
NO FUE UN SUEÑO · IT WAS NO DREAM
Un grupo de estudiantes en Nueva Jersey, en casa durante la pandemia de coronavirus, se reúnieron virtualmente para leer y discutir La Metamorfosis de Franz Kafka. La alquimia de la historia, en la que un joven se cambia en su habitación a un insecto monstruoso, empieza una conversación entre este cohorte de adolescentes de primera y segunda generación inmigrantes.

Este cortometraje documenta el Futuro programa de tutoría juvenil en LALDEF, el Fondo Latinoamericano para la Defensa Legal y la Educación. Agradecemos a todos los estudiantes y educadores y a ProCES, el Program in Community Engaged Scholarship en Princeton University y el Arts Council of Princeton

Talk to Me

When artists are friends, they spend years even decades watching one another’s work change and grow. They talk together in studios, galleries, museums and cafes, discussing the intersection of life and art. These conversations are so important to artists, as a studio practice is quiet and sometimes lonely. The shorthand developed over years of conversation can ignite a body of work, deepen a theme, or reimagine an idea just beginning to take shape. It’s no surprise that such friendships have historically been so important to the development of new ideas and schools of thought.

 

Janet Filomeno and Katherine Parker met in Hoboken in 1991. They felt an immediate affinity as both were painters of large, expressionist works. Each were grappling with the challenges of finding new language to reinvent and personalize the ideas of abstract painting for their generation. A conversation started between the two friends that has continued over 25 plus years. Each woman has continued to paint and show extensively in the NY/ NJ area. The visits to the studio which have unfolded over the years have been an important touchstone for each, a means of trying out and sharing new work, of examining challenges. A trusted voice is paramount as this process takes place.

 

[caption id="attachment_31832" align="aligncenter" width="500"] Katherine Parker[/caption]

Katherine Parker‘s new works address the themes of memory, time and loss. The large painterly pieces are conceived slowly by adding layer after layer of thin oil paint, the forms and marks appearing and receding as the finished painting emerges. Parker has shown her work at MOMA/PS1, the Newark Museum, the Jersey City Museum, Spanierman Modern, Heidi Cho Gallery, Accola Littlejohn Gallery and many other venues in NY and NJ. She is the recipient of a Yaddo Fellowship, an Edward Albee Fellowship and NJ State Council for the Arts grant. She has lectured at many museums and universities in the area about her work.

 

[caption id="attachment_32237" align="aligncenter" width="640"] Janet Filomeno[/caption]

Janet Filomeno is best known for her large-scale gestural, abstract paintings that employ the use of a variety of materials such as ink, mica, shellac, acrylic paint, graphite, charcoal, paint markers, and at times, collage. By the use of her physical action such as pouring, flinging, and throwing colorful liquids onto the stretched canvas on the floor, she is able to reenact the movement one might sense in oceans, rivers, and other bodies of water. In an intuitive process she follows as she uses the physicality of her body to move/shift the canvas in various directions to create a heightened sense of movement as each layer is poured. As various forms and liquids collide together on the canvas one can experience the reference to water and all its associations in both a physical and metaphorical way. Bodies of water are a continuous theme that run throughout her many different series. Filomeno seeks visual metaphors and metaphysical connections to form a collective experience of the internal and external.

 

Filomeno has exhibited on both a national and international level. She has been included in many museum exhibits including The Trenton City Museum, The James A. Michener Museum, The Morris Museum, The Montclair Museum, and The Hunterdon and Paterson Museums. Internationally she has exhibited in Japan, China, Korea, Austria and Italy. 

 

In NYC she has exhibited in various galleries including the JCacciola and Walter Wickiser Gallery. In addition to her exhibition history she has taught and lectured at various museums and universities in the tri-state area. She has been an adjunct professor of art at Montclair State University (18 yrs), and William Paterson University. 

 

Born in New York, NY, Janet Filomeno lives and works in New Hope, PA. Currently her work is represented by the Walter Wickiser Gallery in NYC and Posner Fine Art in Los Angeles, CA. Her work is included in various museums, private and public collections.

 

 

This exhibition is an opportunity to show new work side by side: paintings rich in history and shared experience, reflecting a dialogue of faith, friendship and the possibilities of abstract painting. Talk to Me is a show about long friendships and the conversations between two artists.