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Monday, January 17

Dr Martin Luther King Jr Day 2021: Grab-and-Go Bagel Breakfast + Art-Making

- Free and open to the public!

It’s the Arts Council’s honor to host our community’s annual Dr. Martin Luther King Jr Day program. Last year, we distributed hundreds of custom-made coloring books honoring influential Black Princetonians from history and MLK’s famous visit to the University Chapel. In 2022, we invite you to participate in a town-wide public art installation.

 

On Monday, Jan 17 from 10am-12pm, we’ll safely gather here at the ACP for a free, outdoor event featuring:

  • Grab-and-go bagel breakfast

  • Emblem-making and protest history with the Historical Society of Princeton

  •  Canned food drive benefiting NJ Rise

  • Your chance to participate in a community-wide project: we’ve created lawn signs and window posters featuring our favorite MLK quotes. Join our sign-painting station or take yours home to decorate together. Your completed posters will serve as a town-wide celebration of Dr. King’s teachings.

Free and open to all while supplies last.

This program was made possible by Princeton University, Princeton University Department of African American Studies, the Princeton University Humanities Council, Stark & Stark.

[caption id="attachment_28785" align="alignleft" width="300"] .[/caption]

[caption id="attachment_28885" align="alignleft" width="450"] .[/caption]

In case you missed it: To recognize MLK Day 2021, the Arts Council, in collaboration with the Historical Society of Princeton and neighborhood historian Shirley Satterfield, created a limited-edition coloring book to learn about the impact and influence of Black Princetonians from history. Included in the project are accomplished business owners, politicians, and educators, in addition to Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s visits to campus in the 1960s. Free copies of the coloring book will be available for pick-up at our 2022 event as supplies last. Click the button below to download a free PDF!

 

[caption id="attachment_33273" align="aligncenter" width="350"] .[/caption]

Overcoming: Gallery Night with Rhinold Ponder & Princeton University Wintersession

- Free and open to the public!
Several days before his assassination, Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. proclaimed that “We Shall Overcome”, in a refrain motivated by the hymn of the same name and the generations of Americans who fought (and will continue to fight) for justice and freedom for people of color.   In “Overcoming,” artist, activist and writer, Rhinold Ponder, inspired by Dr. King, employs his mixed media paintings to provoke reflection of the resilience of Black people in a continuing struggle for recognition of their humanity and demand for human rights.
Join Rhinold and Princeton University Wintersession for a free virtual talk.

Master Class Artists Exhibit

[caption id="attachment_33073" align="alignleft" width="241"] LORI LANGSNER
Pink Peonies[/caption]

 

The Arts Council of Princeton presents an an exhibition of new paintings and drawings by artists from the Painting and Drawing Master Class instructed by Charles David Viera. This exhibition will be offered in the Lower Gallery and the public is invited to an artists’ reception Saturday, December 4 from 3-5pm.

Says Viera “These students are from a special class that the Arts Council is now adding to their regular schedule of classes and is for artists that still appreciate a structured class environment. These artists have worked for 3 months to create a wonderful exhibition that includes a variety of representational and expressionistic paintings. The range of ideas and creativity that these artists represent make for an impressive and exciting exhibition.”
This exhibition will feature artworks from Mercer and Hunterdon County artists:
K.Chasalow, M.Babich, M.Kalvar, L.Langsner, A.Meisel, L.Berlik, S.Bershad, P.Huttner, R.Piccione, E.Lange

Overcoming: Reflections on Struggle, Resilience, and Triumph

Several days before his assassination, Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. proclaimed that “We Shall Overcome”, in a refrain motivated by the hymn of the same name and the generations of Americans who fought (and will continue to fight) for justice and freedom for people of color.   In “Overcoming,” artist, activist and writer, Rhinold Ponder, inspired by Dr. King, employs his mixed media paintings to provoke reflection of the resilience of Black people in a continuing struggle for recognition of their humanity and demand for human rights.

 

About Rhinold Ponder

“A viewer’s pained sighs; joyful pauses; thought-provoked headaches; reflexive reconsideration and double-takes. Your tears. My tears. These things define my creative practice. I cry a lot when I paint.  Sometimes joylessly. Sometimes painfully.  But my emotive response during the creative process always lets me know when my work has a chance of touching someone else.”

 

Rhinold Ponder is an artist, writer, activist, independent curator and lawyer based in Princeton, New Jersey.  His interests are broad as reflected in his paintings, mixed media collages and most recently his work in wood sculpture. With a wide range of styles, he frequently focuses on humanity’s faith and will to overcome adversity. His most recent in-person gallery exhibit, at the Kehler-Liddell Gallery in New Haven, Connecticut, “The Rise and Fail of the N-Word” focused on the language and physical manifestation of racism.  The critically acclaimed exhibition made its debut at Princeton University at the Carl Field Center in 2014. Rhinold has exhibited in a variety of galleries, virtual exhibitions and alternative venues, largely on the east coast, over the past 19 years.

 

At 62, Rhinold has been a founding member of several arts and educational advocacy organizations.  In 2020, he founded Art Against Racism, a non-profit organization whose mission is to employ art to inspire others to end racism and build an anti-racist society.  He is a founding member of Princeton Makes, a recently established diverse artist cooperative. He also a co-founder of Princeton Parents for Black Children, a non-profit which advocates for equity for all Black children in the Princeton School District.  Inspired by the response to the debut of “The Rise and Fail of the N-Word,” Rhinold created the “Beyond Black and White Discussion Group,” a Facebook community of 7200 members to promote critical and civil discussions on issues related to humanity and justice.

 

A graduate of Princeton University (’81), where he earned an A.B. in politics, Rhinold achieved his juris doctorate from New York University Law School where he was the editor-in-chief of the NYU Review of Law and Social Change – the first African-American to head an NYU law review.  He also achieved masters in Journalism and African American Studies while a Martin Luther King Fellow at Boston University. 

 

His work on non-profit boards and community organizations is extensive.  Previously, he presided over the board of trustees of the Tony award-winning Crossroads Theatre and successfully led a community effort to save the company. He is presently on the gallery committee of the Arts Council of Princeton. 

 

As an author, his writings have appeared in numerous publications including the New York Times, the Trenton Times, Afropunk and the City Sun.  In 1997, he co-edited, with his wife, Michele Tuck-Ponder, two critically acclaimed compilations of sermons, published by Crown, entitled Wisdom of the Word: Faith and Wisdom of the Word: Love. 

 

His wife, Michele, is a non-profit executive and former Mayor of Princeton Township. Rhinold has two children: Jamaica Ponder, who recently graduated from Northwestern’s Medill School of Journalism, and William Ponder, a freshman in high school.    

Traces of Time

 

Change is constant. The process of growing older is a fact. These images contain traces of a lifetime’s memories. They have to do with the passing of time, moments and people that are gone, love, sexuality, family, beauty, decay, fragility, longevity, vulnerability, sickness, health, the pandemic and death.

 

This project started when I fractured my pelvis, was immobile, and could only get around with a walker. Friends sent bouquets and with severely limited motion, I began to photograph them on my kitchen table, finding beauty in their decay. From that initial work I continued in many directions: among them portraits of friends, flowers frozen in melting ice, images created with a scanner, combining live and dead flowers, painting on vegetation, and observing the passage of time in nature. I was fascinated by the emergence of the 17 year cicadas in Princeton (third time in my life), their short life cycle and their persistence to mate. Friends brought me dead birds, their fragility revealing the tragic beauty of mortality. Inevitably, all things will become one with the earth.

 

Tuesday, January 18

Master Class Artists Exhibit

[caption id="attachment_33073" align="alignleft" width="241"] LORI LANGSNER
Pink Peonies[/caption]

 

The Arts Council of Princeton presents an an exhibition of new paintings and drawings by artists from the Painting and Drawing Master Class instructed by Charles David Viera. This exhibition will be offered in the Lower Gallery and the public is invited to an artists’ reception Saturday, December 4 from 3-5pm.

Says Viera “These students are from a special class that the Arts Council is now adding to their regular schedule of classes and is for artists that still appreciate a structured class environment. These artists have worked for 3 months to create a wonderful exhibition that includes a variety of representational and expressionistic paintings. The range of ideas and creativity that these artists represent make for an impressive and exciting exhibition.”
This exhibition will feature artworks from Mercer and Hunterdon County artists:
K.Chasalow, M.Babich, M.Kalvar, L.Langsner, A.Meisel, L.Berlik, S.Bershad, P.Huttner, R.Piccione, E.Lange

Overcoming: Reflections on Struggle, Resilience, and Triumph

Several days before his assassination, Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. proclaimed that “We Shall Overcome”, in a refrain motivated by the hymn of the same name and the generations of Americans who fought (and will continue to fight) for justice and freedom for people of color.   In “Overcoming,” artist, activist and writer, Rhinold Ponder, inspired by Dr. King, employs his mixed media paintings to provoke reflection of the resilience of Black people in a continuing struggle for recognition of their humanity and demand for human rights.

 

About Rhinold Ponder

“A viewer’s pained sighs; joyful pauses; thought-provoked headaches; reflexive reconsideration and double-takes. Your tears. My tears. These things define my creative practice. I cry a lot when I paint.  Sometimes joylessly. Sometimes painfully.  But my emotive response during the creative process always lets me know when my work has a chance of touching someone else.”

 

Rhinold Ponder is an artist, writer, activist, independent curator and lawyer based in Princeton, New Jersey.  His interests are broad as reflected in his paintings, mixed media collages and most recently his work in wood sculpture. With a wide range of styles, he frequently focuses on humanity’s faith and will to overcome adversity. His most recent in-person gallery exhibit, at the Kehler-Liddell Gallery in New Haven, Connecticut, “The Rise and Fail of the N-Word” focused on the language and physical manifestation of racism.  The critically acclaimed exhibition made its debut at Princeton University at the Carl Field Center in 2014. Rhinold has exhibited in a variety of galleries, virtual exhibitions and alternative venues, largely on the east coast, over the past 19 years.

 

At 62, Rhinold has been a founding member of several arts and educational advocacy organizations.  In 2020, he founded Art Against Racism, a non-profit organization whose mission is to employ art to inspire others to end racism and build an anti-racist society.  He is a founding member of Princeton Makes, a recently established diverse artist cooperative. He also a co-founder of Princeton Parents for Black Children, a non-profit which advocates for equity for all Black children in the Princeton School District.  Inspired by the response to the debut of “The Rise and Fail of the N-Word,” Rhinold created the “Beyond Black and White Discussion Group,” a Facebook community of 7200 members to promote critical and civil discussions on issues related to humanity and justice.

 

A graduate of Princeton University (’81), where he earned an A.B. in politics, Rhinold achieved his juris doctorate from New York University Law School where he was the editor-in-chief of the NYU Review of Law and Social Change – the first African-American to head an NYU law review.  He also achieved masters in Journalism and African American Studies while a Martin Luther King Fellow at Boston University. 

 

His work on non-profit boards and community organizations is extensive.  Previously, he presided over the board of trustees of the Tony award-winning Crossroads Theatre and successfully led a community effort to save the company. He is presently on the gallery committee of the Arts Council of Princeton. 

 

As an author, his writings have appeared in numerous publications including the New York Times, the Trenton Times, Afropunk and the City Sun.  In 1997, he co-edited, with his wife, Michele Tuck-Ponder, two critically acclaimed compilations of sermons, published by Crown, entitled Wisdom of the Word: Faith and Wisdom of the Word: Love. 

 

His wife, Michele, is a non-profit executive and former Mayor of Princeton Township. Rhinold has two children: Jamaica Ponder, who recently graduated from Northwestern’s Medill School of Journalism, and William Ponder, a freshman in high school.    

Traces of Time

 

Change is constant. The process of growing older is a fact. These images contain traces of a lifetime’s memories. They have to do with the passing of time, moments and people that are gone, love, sexuality, family, beauty, decay, fragility, longevity, vulnerability, sickness, health, the pandemic and death.

 

This project started when I fractured my pelvis, was immobile, and could only get around with a walker. Friends sent bouquets and with severely limited motion, I began to photograph them on my kitchen table, finding beauty in their decay. From that initial work I continued in many directions: among them portraits of friends, flowers frozen in melting ice, images created with a scanner, combining live and dead flowers, painting on vegetation, and observing the passage of time in nature. I was fascinated by the emergence of the 17 year cicadas in Princeton (third time in my life), their short life cycle and their persistence to mate. Friends brought me dead birds, their fragility revealing the tragic beauty of mortality. Inevitably, all things will become one with the earth.

 

Wednesday, January 19

Princeton Pecha

-

Princeton Pecha brings local artists together to share their work in a virtual program inspired by PechaKucha, a lively, upbeat format created in Japan designed for more show and less talk. Each artist shows 20 slides for 20 seconds each (about 7 minutes per artist), exhibiting for the audience an array of visual expression.

This iteration of Princeton Pecha will highlight talented area artists hosted and curated by artist Heather Barros.

Featured artists:

  • Jane Adriance
  • Beatrice Bork
  • Bill Jersey
  • Joe Kazimierczyk
  • Laura Renner
  • Carol Sanzalone
[caption id="attachment_33453" align="aligncenter" width="300"] .[/caption]

Master Class Artists Exhibit

[caption id="attachment_33073" align="alignleft" width="241"] LORI LANGSNER
Pink Peonies[/caption]

 

The Arts Council of Princeton presents an an exhibition of new paintings and drawings by artists from the Painting and Drawing Master Class instructed by Charles David Viera. This exhibition will be offered in the Lower Gallery and the public is invited to an artists’ reception Saturday, December 4 from 3-5pm.

Says Viera “These students are from a special class that the Arts Council is now adding to their regular schedule of classes and is for artists that still appreciate a structured class environment. These artists have worked for 3 months to create a wonderful exhibition that includes a variety of representational and expressionistic paintings. The range of ideas and creativity that these artists represent make for an impressive and exciting exhibition.”
This exhibition will feature artworks from Mercer and Hunterdon County artists:
K.Chasalow, M.Babich, M.Kalvar, L.Langsner, A.Meisel, L.Berlik, S.Bershad, P.Huttner, R.Piccione, E.Lange

Overcoming: Reflections on Struggle, Resilience, and Triumph

Several days before his assassination, Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. proclaimed that “We Shall Overcome”, in a refrain motivated by the hymn of the same name and the generations of Americans who fought (and will continue to fight) for justice and freedom for people of color.   In “Overcoming,” artist, activist and writer, Rhinold Ponder, inspired by Dr. King, employs his mixed media paintings to provoke reflection of the resilience of Black people in a continuing struggle for recognition of their humanity and demand for human rights.

 

About Rhinold Ponder

“A viewer’s pained sighs; joyful pauses; thought-provoked headaches; reflexive reconsideration and double-takes. Your tears. My tears. These things define my creative practice. I cry a lot when I paint.  Sometimes joylessly. Sometimes painfully.  But my emotive response during the creative process always lets me know when my work has a chance of touching someone else.”

 

Rhinold Ponder is an artist, writer, activist, independent curator and lawyer based in Princeton, New Jersey.  His interests are broad as reflected in his paintings, mixed media collages and most recently his work in wood sculpture. With a wide range of styles, he frequently focuses on humanity’s faith and will to overcome adversity. His most recent in-person gallery exhibit, at the Kehler-Liddell Gallery in New Haven, Connecticut, “The Rise and Fail of the N-Word” focused on the language and physical manifestation of racism.  The critically acclaimed exhibition made its debut at Princeton University at the Carl Field Center in 2014. Rhinold has exhibited in a variety of galleries, virtual exhibitions and alternative venues, largely on the east coast, over the past 19 years.

 

At 62, Rhinold has been a founding member of several arts and educational advocacy organizations.  In 2020, he founded Art Against Racism, a non-profit organization whose mission is to employ art to inspire others to end racism and build an anti-racist society.  He is a founding member of Princeton Makes, a recently established diverse artist cooperative. He also a co-founder of Princeton Parents for Black Children, a non-profit which advocates for equity for all Black children in the Princeton School District.  Inspired by the response to the debut of “The Rise and Fail of the N-Word,” Rhinold created the “Beyond Black and White Discussion Group,” a Facebook community of 7200 members to promote critical and civil discussions on issues related to humanity and justice.

 

A graduate of Princeton University (’81), where he earned an A.B. in politics, Rhinold achieved his juris doctorate from New York University Law School where he was the editor-in-chief of the NYU Review of Law and Social Change – the first African-American to head an NYU law review.  He also achieved masters in Journalism and African American Studies while a Martin Luther King Fellow at Boston University. 

 

His work on non-profit boards and community organizations is extensive.  Previously, he presided over the board of trustees of the Tony award-winning Crossroads Theatre and successfully led a community effort to save the company. He is presently on the gallery committee of the Arts Council of Princeton. 

 

As an author, his writings have appeared in numerous publications including the New York Times, the Trenton Times, Afropunk and the City Sun.  In 1997, he co-edited, with his wife, Michele Tuck-Ponder, two critically acclaimed compilations of sermons, published by Crown, entitled Wisdom of the Word: Faith and Wisdom of the Word: Love. 

 

His wife, Michele, is a non-profit executive and former Mayor of Princeton Township. Rhinold has two children: Jamaica Ponder, who recently graduated from Northwestern’s Medill School of Journalism, and William Ponder, a freshman in high school.    

Traces of Time

 

Change is constant. The process of growing older is a fact. These images contain traces of a lifetime’s memories. They have to do with the passing of time, moments and people that are gone, love, sexuality, family, beauty, decay, fragility, longevity, vulnerability, sickness, health, the pandemic and death.

 

This project started when I fractured my pelvis, was immobile, and could only get around with a walker. Friends sent bouquets and with severely limited motion, I began to photograph them on my kitchen table, finding beauty in their decay. From that initial work I continued in many directions: among them portraits of friends, flowers frozen in melting ice, images created with a scanner, combining live and dead flowers, painting on vegetation, and observing the passage of time in nature. I was fascinated by the emergence of the 17 year cicadas in Princeton (third time in my life), their short life cycle and their persistence to mate. Friends brought me dead birds, their fragility revealing the tragic beauty of mortality. Inevitably, all things will become one with the earth.

 

Thursday, January 20

Master Class Artists Exhibit

[caption id="attachment_33073" align="alignleft" width="241"] LORI LANGSNER
Pink Peonies[/caption]

 

The Arts Council of Princeton presents an an exhibition of new paintings and drawings by artists from the Painting and Drawing Master Class instructed by Charles David Viera. This exhibition will be offered in the Lower Gallery and the public is invited to an artists’ reception Saturday, December 4 from 3-5pm.

Says Viera “These students are from a special class that the Arts Council is now adding to their regular schedule of classes and is for artists that still appreciate a structured class environment. These artists have worked for 3 months to create a wonderful exhibition that includes a variety of representational and expressionistic paintings. The range of ideas and creativity that these artists represent make for an impressive and exciting exhibition.”
This exhibition will feature artworks from Mercer and Hunterdon County artists:
K.Chasalow, M.Babich, M.Kalvar, L.Langsner, A.Meisel, L.Berlik, S.Bershad, P.Huttner, R.Piccione, E.Lange

Overcoming: Reflections on Struggle, Resilience, and Triumph

Several days before his assassination, Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. proclaimed that “We Shall Overcome”, in a refrain motivated by the hymn of the same name and the generations of Americans who fought (and will continue to fight) for justice and freedom for people of color.   In “Overcoming,” artist, activist and writer, Rhinold Ponder, inspired by Dr. King, employs his mixed media paintings to provoke reflection of the resilience of Black people in a continuing struggle for recognition of their humanity and demand for human rights.

 

About Rhinold Ponder

“A viewer’s pained sighs; joyful pauses; thought-provoked headaches; reflexive reconsideration and double-takes. Your tears. My tears. These things define my creative practice. I cry a lot when I paint.  Sometimes joylessly. Sometimes painfully.  But my emotive response during the creative process always lets me know when my work has a chance of touching someone else.”

 

Rhinold Ponder is an artist, writer, activist, independent curator and lawyer based in Princeton, New Jersey.  His interests are broad as reflected in his paintings, mixed media collages and most recently his work in wood sculpture. With a wide range of styles, he frequently focuses on humanity’s faith and will to overcome adversity. His most recent in-person gallery exhibit, at the Kehler-Liddell Gallery in New Haven, Connecticut, “The Rise and Fail of the N-Word” focused on the language and physical manifestation of racism.  The critically acclaimed exhibition made its debut at Princeton University at the Carl Field Center in 2014. Rhinold has exhibited in a variety of galleries, virtual exhibitions and alternative venues, largely on the east coast, over the past 19 years.

 

At 62, Rhinold has been a founding member of several arts and educational advocacy organizations.  In 2020, he founded Art Against Racism, a non-profit organization whose mission is to employ art to inspire others to end racism and build an anti-racist society.  He is a founding member of Princeton Makes, a recently established diverse artist cooperative. He also a co-founder of Princeton Parents for Black Children, a non-profit which advocates for equity for all Black children in the Princeton School District.  Inspired by the response to the debut of “The Rise and Fail of the N-Word,” Rhinold created the “Beyond Black and White Discussion Group,” a Facebook community of 7200 members to promote critical and civil discussions on issues related to humanity and justice.

 

A graduate of Princeton University (’81), where he earned an A.B. in politics, Rhinold achieved his juris doctorate from New York University Law School where he was the editor-in-chief of the NYU Review of Law and Social Change – the first African-American to head an NYU law review.  He also achieved masters in Journalism and African American Studies while a Martin Luther King Fellow at Boston University. 

 

His work on non-profit boards and community organizations is extensive.  Previously, he presided over the board of trustees of the Tony award-winning Crossroads Theatre and successfully led a community effort to save the company. He is presently on the gallery committee of the Arts Council of Princeton. 

 

As an author, his writings have appeared in numerous publications including the New York Times, the Trenton Times, Afropunk and the City Sun.  In 1997, he co-edited, with his wife, Michele Tuck-Ponder, two critically acclaimed compilations of sermons, published by Crown, entitled Wisdom of the Word: Faith and Wisdom of the Word: Love. 

 

His wife, Michele, is a non-profit executive and former Mayor of Princeton Township. Rhinold has two children: Jamaica Ponder, who recently graduated from Northwestern’s Medill School of Journalism, and William Ponder, a freshman in high school.    

Traces of Time

 

Change is constant. The process of growing older is a fact. These images contain traces of a lifetime’s memories. They have to do with the passing of time, moments and people that are gone, love, sexuality, family, beauty, decay, fragility, longevity, vulnerability, sickness, health, the pandemic and death.

 

This project started when I fractured my pelvis, was immobile, and could only get around with a walker. Friends sent bouquets and with severely limited motion, I began to photograph them on my kitchen table, finding beauty in their decay. From that initial work I continued in many directions: among them portraits of friends, flowers frozen in melting ice, images created with a scanner, combining live and dead flowers, painting on vegetation, and observing the passage of time in nature. I was fascinated by the emergence of the 17 year cicadas in Princeton (third time in my life), their short life cycle and their persistence to mate. Friends brought me dead birds, their fragility revealing the tragic beauty of mortality. Inevitably, all things will become one with the earth.

 

Friday, January 21

Master Class Artists Exhibit

[caption id="attachment_33073" align="alignleft" width="241"] LORI LANGSNER
Pink Peonies[/caption]

 

The Arts Council of Princeton presents an an exhibition of new paintings and drawings by artists from the Painting and Drawing Master Class instructed by Charles David Viera. This exhibition will be offered in the Lower Gallery and the public is invited to an artists’ reception Saturday, December 4 from 3-5pm.

Says Viera “These students are from a special class that the Arts Council is now adding to their regular schedule of classes and is for artists that still appreciate a structured class environment. These artists have worked for 3 months to create a wonderful exhibition that includes a variety of representational and expressionistic paintings. The range of ideas and creativity that these artists represent make for an impressive and exciting exhibition.”
This exhibition will feature artworks from Mercer and Hunterdon County artists:
K.Chasalow, M.Babich, M.Kalvar, L.Langsner, A.Meisel, L.Berlik, S.Bershad, P.Huttner, R.Piccione, E.Lange

Overcoming: Reflections on Struggle, Resilience, and Triumph

Several days before his assassination, Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. proclaimed that “We Shall Overcome”, in a refrain motivated by the hymn of the same name and the generations of Americans who fought (and will continue to fight) for justice and freedom for people of color.   In “Overcoming,” artist, activist and writer, Rhinold Ponder, inspired by Dr. King, employs his mixed media paintings to provoke reflection of the resilience of Black people in a continuing struggle for recognition of their humanity and demand for human rights.

 

About Rhinold Ponder

“A viewer’s pained sighs; joyful pauses; thought-provoked headaches; reflexive reconsideration and double-takes. Your tears. My tears. These things define my creative practice. I cry a lot when I paint.  Sometimes joylessly. Sometimes painfully.  But my emotive response during the creative process always lets me know when my work has a chance of touching someone else.”

 

Rhinold Ponder is an artist, writer, activist, independent curator and lawyer based in Princeton, New Jersey.  His interests are broad as reflected in his paintings, mixed media collages and most recently his work in wood sculpture. With a wide range of styles, he frequently focuses on humanity’s faith and will to overcome adversity. His most recent in-person gallery exhibit, at the Kehler-Liddell Gallery in New Haven, Connecticut, “The Rise and Fail of the N-Word” focused on the language and physical manifestation of racism.  The critically acclaimed exhibition made its debut at Princeton University at the Carl Field Center in 2014. Rhinold has exhibited in a variety of galleries, virtual exhibitions and alternative venues, largely on the east coast, over the past 19 years.

 

At 62, Rhinold has been a founding member of several arts and educational advocacy organizations.  In 2020, he founded Art Against Racism, a non-profit organization whose mission is to employ art to inspire others to end racism and build an anti-racist society.  He is a founding member of Princeton Makes, a recently established diverse artist cooperative. He also a co-founder of Princeton Parents for Black Children, a non-profit which advocates for equity for all Black children in the Princeton School District.  Inspired by the response to the debut of “The Rise and Fail of the N-Word,” Rhinold created the “Beyond Black and White Discussion Group,” a Facebook community of 7200 members to promote critical and civil discussions on issues related to humanity and justice.

 

A graduate of Princeton University (’81), where he earned an A.B. in politics, Rhinold achieved his juris doctorate from New York University Law School where he was the editor-in-chief of the NYU Review of Law and Social Change – the first African-American to head an NYU law review.  He also achieved masters in Journalism and African American Studies while a Martin Luther King Fellow at Boston University. 

 

His work on non-profit boards and community organizations is extensive.  Previously, he presided over the board of trustees of the Tony award-winning Crossroads Theatre and successfully led a community effort to save the company. He is presently on the gallery committee of the Arts Council of Princeton. 

 

As an author, his writings have appeared in numerous publications including the New York Times, the Trenton Times, Afropunk and the City Sun.  In 1997, he co-edited, with his wife, Michele Tuck-Ponder, two critically acclaimed compilations of sermons, published by Crown, entitled Wisdom of the Word: Faith and Wisdom of the Word: Love. 

 

His wife, Michele, is a non-profit executive and former Mayor of Princeton Township. Rhinold has two children: Jamaica Ponder, who recently graduated from Northwestern’s Medill School of Journalism, and William Ponder, a freshman in high school.    

Traces of Time

 

Change is constant. The process of growing older is a fact. These images contain traces of a lifetime’s memories. They have to do with the passing of time, moments and people that are gone, love, sexuality, family, beauty, decay, fragility, longevity, vulnerability, sickness, health, the pandemic and death.

 

This project started when I fractured my pelvis, was immobile, and could only get around with a walker. Friends sent bouquets and with severely limited motion, I began to photograph them on my kitchen table, finding beauty in their decay. From that initial work I continued in many directions: among them portraits of friends, flowers frozen in melting ice, images created with a scanner, combining live and dead flowers, painting on vegetation, and observing the passage of time in nature. I was fascinated by the emergence of the 17 year cicadas in Princeton (third time in my life), their short life cycle and their persistence to mate. Friends brought me dead birds, their fragility revealing the tragic beauty of mortality. Inevitably, all things will become one with the earth.

 

Saturday, January 22

Canceled: Café Improv

- $1 ACP Members; $2 General Admission

Please note that the January 2022 iteration of Cafe Improv has been canceled. The next performance is scheduled for Saturday, February 26.


For the past 25 years, Café Improv has connected beginning and professional performers in the Arts Council of Princeton’s Solley Theater. Attendees can expect an evening of exciting local music, poetry, comedy, and more. Café Improv is easily accessible to the public through affordable admission rates of $1 for ACP Members and $2 General Admission. Click here to learn more and/or register to play!

 

Master Class Artists Exhibit

[caption id="attachment_33073" align="alignleft" width="241"] LORI LANGSNER
Pink Peonies[/caption]

 

The Arts Council of Princeton presents an an exhibition of new paintings and drawings by artists from the Painting and Drawing Master Class instructed by Charles David Viera. This exhibition will be offered in the Lower Gallery and the public is invited to an artists’ reception Saturday, December 4 from 3-5pm.

Says Viera “These students are from a special class that the Arts Council is now adding to their regular schedule of classes and is for artists that still appreciate a structured class environment. These artists have worked for 3 months to create a wonderful exhibition that includes a variety of representational and expressionistic paintings. The range of ideas and creativity that these artists represent make for an impressive and exciting exhibition.”
This exhibition will feature artworks from Mercer and Hunterdon County artists:
K.Chasalow, M.Babich, M.Kalvar, L.Langsner, A.Meisel, L.Berlik, S.Bershad, P.Huttner, R.Piccione, E.Lange

Overcoming: Reflections on Struggle, Resilience, and Triumph

Several days before his assassination, Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. proclaimed that “We Shall Overcome”, in a refrain motivated by the hymn of the same name and the generations of Americans who fought (and will continue to fight) for justice and freedom for people of color.   In “Overcoming,” artist, activist and writer, Rhinold Ponder, inspired by Dr. King, employs his mixed media paintings to provoke reflection of the resilience of Black people in a continuing struggle for recognition of their humanity and demand for human rights.

 

About Rhinold Ponder

“A viewer’s pained sighs; joyful pauses; thought-provoked headaches; reflexive reconsideration and double-takes. Your tears. My tears. These things define my creative practice. I cry a lot when I paint.  Sometimes joylessly. Sometimes painfully.  But my emotive response during the creative process always lets me know when my work has a chance of touching someone else.”

 

Rhinold Ponder is an artist, writer, activist, independent curator and lawyer based in Princeton, New Jersey.  His interests are broad as reflected in his paintings, mixed media collages and most recently his work in wood sculpture. With a wide range of styles, he frequently focuses on humanity’s faith and will to overcome adversity. His most recent in-person gallery exhibit, at the Kehler-Liddell Gallery in New Haven, Connecticut, “The Rise and Fail of the N-Word” focused on the language and physical manifestation of racism.  The critically acclaimed exhibition made its debut at Princeton University at the Carl Field Center in 2014. Rhinold has exhibited in a variety of galleries, virtual exhibitions and alternative venues, largely on the east coast, over the past 19 years.

 

At 62, Rhinold has been a founding member of several arts and educational advocacy organizations.  In 2020, he founded Art Against Racism, a non-profit organization whose mission is to employ art to inspire others to end racism and build an anti-racist society.  He is a founding member of Princeton Makes, a recently established diverse artist cooperative. He also a co-founder of Princeton Parents for Black Children, a non-profit which advocates for equity for all Black children in the Princeton School District.  Inspired by the response to the debut of “The Rise and Fail of the N-Word,” Rhinold created the “Beyond Black and White Discussion Group,” a Facebook community of 7200 members to promote critical and civil discussions on issues related to humanity and justice.

 

A graduate of Princeton University (’81), where he earned an A.B. in politics, Rhinold achieved his juris doctorate from New York University Law School where he was the editor-in-chief of the NYU Review of Law and Social Change – the first African-American to head an NYU law review.  He also achieved masters in Journalism and African American Studies while a Martin Luther King Fellow at Boston University. 

 

His work on non-profit boards and community organizations is extensive.  Previously, he presided over the board of trustees of the Tony award-winning Crossroads Theatre and successfully led a community effort to save the company. He is presently on the gallery committee of the Arts Council of Princeton. 

 

As an author, his writings have appeared in numerous publications including the New York Times, the Trenton Times, Afropunk and the City Sun.  In 1997, he co-edited, with his wife, Michele Tuck-Ponder, two critically acclaimed compilations of sermons, published by Crown, entitled Wisdom of the Word: Faith and Wisdom of the Word: Love. 

 

His wife, Michele, is a non-profit executive and former Mayor of Princeton Township. Rhinold has two children: Jamaica Ponder, who recently graduated from Northwestern’s Medill School of Journalism, and William Ponder, a freshman in high school.    

Traces of Time

 

Change is constant. The process of growing older is a fact. These images contain traces of a lifetime’s memories. They have to do with the passing of time, moments and people that are gone, love, sexuality, family, beauty, decay, fragility, longevity, vulnerability, sickness, health, the pandemic and death.

 

This project started when I fractured my pelvis, was immobile, and could only get around with a walker. Friends sent bouquets and with severely limited motion, I began to photograph them on my kitchen table, finding beauty in their decay. From that initial work I continued in many directions: among them portraits of friends, flowers frozen in melting ice, images created with a scanner, combining live and dead flowers, painting on vegetation, and observing the passage of time in nature. I was fascinated by the emergence of the 17 year cicadas in Princeton (third time in my life), their short life cycle and their persistence to mate. Friends brought me dead birds, their fragility revealing the tragic beauty of mortality. Inevitably, all things will become one with the earth.

 

Sunday, January 23

Master Class Artists Exhibit

[caption id="attachment_33073" align="alignleft" width="241"] LORI LANGSNER
Pink Peonies[/caption]

 

The Arts Council of Princeton presents an an exhibition of new paintings and drawings by artists from the Painting and Drawing Master Class instructed by Charles David Viera. This exhibition will be offered in the Lower Gallery and the public is invited to an artists’ reception Saturday, December 4 from 3-5pm.

Says Viera “These students are from a special class that the Arts Council is now adding to their regular schedule of classes and is for artists that still appreciate a structured class environment. These artists have worked for 3 months to create a wonderful exhibition that includes a variety of representational and expressionistic paintings. The range of ideas and creativity that these artists represent make for an impressive and exciting exhibition.”
This exhibition will feature artworks from Mercer and Hunterdon County artists:
K.Chasalow, M.Babich, M.Kalvar, L.Langsner, A.Meisel, L.Berlik, S.Bershad, P.Huttner, R.Piccione, E.Lange

Overcoming: Reflections on Struggle, Resilience, and Triumph

Several days before his assassination, Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. proclaimed that “We Shall Overcome”, in a refrain motivated by the hymn of the same name and the generations of Americans who fought (and will continue to fight) for justice and freedom for people of color.   In “Overcoming,” artist, activist and writer, Rhinold Ponder, inspired by Dr. King, employs his mixed media paintings to provoke reflection of the resilience of Black people in a continuing struggle for recognition of their humanity and demand for human rights.

 

About Rhinold Ponder

“A viewer’s pained sighs; joyful pauses; thought-provoked headaches; reflexive reconsideration and double-takes. Your tears. My tears. These things define my creative practice. I cry a lot when I paint.  Sometimes joylessly. Sometimes painfully.  But my emotive response during the creative process always lets me know when my work has a chance of touching someone else.”

 

Rhinold Ponder is an artist, writer, activist, independent curator and lawyer based in Princeton, New Jersey.  His interests are broad as reflected in his paintings, mixed media collages and most recently his work in wood sculpture. With a wide range of styles, he frequently focuses on humanity’s faith and will to overcome adversity. His most recent in-person gallery exhibit, at the Kehler-Liddell Gallery in New Haven, Connecticut, “The Rise and Fail of the N-Word” focused on the language and physical manifestation of racism.  The critically acclaimed exhibition made its debut at Princeton University at the Carl Field Center in 2014. Rhinold has exhibited in a variety of galleries, virtual exhibitions and alternative venues, largely on the east coast, over the past 19 years.

 

At 62, Rhinold has been a founding member of several arts and educational advocacy organizations.  In 2020, he founded Art Against Racism, a non-profit organization whose mission is to employ art to inspire others to end racism and build an anti-racist society.  He is a founding member of Princeton Makes, a recently established diverse artist cooperative. He also a co-founder of Princeton Parents for Black Children, a non-profit which advocates for equity for all Black children in the Princeton School District.  Inspired by the response to the debut of “The Rise and Fail of the N-Word,” Rhinold created the “Beyond Black and White Discussion Group,” a Facebook community of 7200 members to promote critical and civil discussions on issues related to humanity and justice.

 

A graduate of Princeton University (’81), where he earned an A.B. in politics, Rhinold achieved his juris doctorate from New York University Law School where he was the editor-in-chief of the NYU Review of Law and Social Change – the first African-American to head an NYU law review.  He also achieved masters in Journalism and African American Studies while a Martin Luther King Fellow at Boston University. 

 

His work on non-profit boards and community organizations is extensive.  Previously, he presided over the board of trustees of the Tony award-winning Crossroads Theatre and successfully led a community effort to save the company. He is presently on the gallery committee of the Arts Council of Princeton. 

 

As an author, his writings have appeared in numerous publications including the New York Times, the Trenton Times, Afropunk and the City Sun.  In 1997, he co-edited, with his wife, Michele Tuck-Ponder, two critically acclaimed compilations of sermons, published by Crown, entitled Wisdom of the Word: Faith and Wisdom of the Word: Love. 

 

His wife, Michele, is a non-profit executive and former Mayor of Princeton Township. Rhinold has two children: Jamaica Ponder, who recently graduated from Northwestern’s Medill School of Journalism, and William Ponder, a freshman in high school.    

Traces of Time

 

Change is constant. The process of growing older is a fact. These images contain traces of a lifetime’s memories. They have to do with the passing of time, moments and people that are gone, love, sexuality, family, beauty, decay, fragility, longevity, vulnerability, sickness, health, the pandemic and death.

 

This project started when I fractured my pelvis, was immobile, and could only get around with a walker. Friends sent bouquets and with severely limited motion, I began to photograph them on my kitchen table, finding beauty in their decay. From that initial work I continued in many directions: among them portraits of friends, flowers frozen in melting ice, images created with a scanner, combining live and dead flowers, painting on vegetation, and observing the passage of time in nature. I was fascinated by the emergence of the 17 year cicadas in Princeton (third time in my life), their short life cycle and their persistence to mate. Friends brought me dead birds, their fragility revealing the tragic beauty of mortality. Inevitably, all things will become one with the earth.