All That You Leave Behind Diana Weymar, Nelson Hancock

January 5 - March 16

Nelson Hancock

All That You Leave Behind, a collaboration between textile artist Diana Weymar and photographer Nelson Hancock, explores narrative and artistic interpretations of personal, everyday objects. How many of us have shopped at estate sales, driven past dilapidated houses, or visited historical sites only to find ourselves creating stories about the former owners or occupants? The urge to tell stories about what is left behind satisfies our need and desire to infuse the materiality of objects with personal meaning.

 

Diana Weymar

Objects are a material evidence of life already lived. We carefully curate our own lives based on the premise that meaning can be implied, that we can control our own narratives after we have passed, and that we will be remembered through these objects. When we photograph an object or use one for artist interpretation, we are both speaking for it and for ourselves. Whether it’s a photo of a worn and decaying kitchen, embroidered text on a doll’s clothing, or an actual object, the space between it and the viewer is filled with intangible forces that have defined our lives.

 

More Exhibitions

COMMUNICATION BETWEEN FORMS

My work has been evolving recently to include more layers, more color and more depth. I’ve been continuing the push to step away from the usual process, which was: draw a shape and fill in the shape. Instead, I’ve been creating organic forms, activating the negative spaces, layering and mixing paints all while continuing to think as if the forms were communicating with each other. For a long time I was compelled to create very crisp and clean lines in my work. The “graphic designer”

Nature Restores

When working in plein air I try to convey the sense of peace that I feel when working outside, surrounded by the light that I attempt to capture. Interacting with nature is an invigorating force and landscape painting is a timeless art form that reflects our past, and our future. The changing seasons of New Jersey echo the rhythms of our lives. The interplay between a tree and the sky or light and shadow represent the essence of our natural world that should be cherished.

Donor Wheel

More than 2,000 donors are acknowledged in this one-of-a-kind sculpture by Joshua Kirsch

Neighborhood Portrait

The Neighborhood Portrait Quilt is part of a permanent exhibition that tells a story of important leaders and residents.