Ceramics by Jenyfer Guethe Jenyfer Guethe

March 30 - May 4

Visit the Arts Council of Princeton’s Solley Lobby Gallery to view work by ceramic artist Jenyfer Guethe.
My work with clay combines functional pottery with free flowing sculptural forms. Since I was young I’ve been fascinated with how nature seems to have an overall “flow”, similar to how ocean waves are constantly changing the shoreline with each ebb and flow of the tide. This can leave a subtle soft touch on the sand when a gentle wave has pulled away, or a more pronounced sharper gouge to the shoreline if there are rougher seas. I translate that thinking into my work that nothing is set in stone – what starts out as a simply thrown bowl can be carved, altered, and ultimately completely transformed from the original shape. Every piece has the possibility to become something completely different than how it was initially created. I find carving my work therapeutic as well.. with every piece, each alteration through carving is slowly changing the shape to express its full potential. I aim to create pottery that will be admired while used, and hope to inspire people that anything that began as ordinary can be transformed into something extraordinary.
-Jenyfer Guethe

More Exhibitions

Waves and Ripples

This project is a celebration of water and a metaphor for life and human emotions.

Our Universe – From Here to Infinity

“I became interested in astronomy and the nature and scope of our universe when I first started to learn about these things in elementary school. But then decades passed where I focused on other things in life. In 1999, my interest in astronomy was rekindled by my friend/colleague Kirk Alexander who was at the time the Director of the Amateur Astronomers Association of Princeton (AAAP). I bought myself a telescope and a tracking mount and tried to have a visual look at things from the

LUMINOUS MATTER

My work LUMINOUS MATTER channels the forces of fluid dynamics. I achieve this otherworldly look in my artwork by combining pigments, fluids, and additives to produce a physical reaction. Layering different densities of paint leads to the formation of cellular structures that echo natural processes. Some of my results are comparable to phenomena that can be observed in astronomy, such as the Rayleigh-Taylor instability seen in The Crab Nebula. To create my paintings, I myself mimic the forces of nature by using multiple types of

Donor Wheel

More than 2,000 donors are acknowledged in this one-of-a-kind sculpture by Joshua Kirsch

Neighborhood Portrait

The Neighborhood Portrait Quilt is part of a permanent exhibition that tells a story of important leaders and residents.