Philip Pearlstein: A Legacy of Influence Philip Pearlstein, Janet Fish, Stephen Lorber, Charles Viera, Altoon Sultan, Tony Phillips, George Nick, Lorraine Shemesh, and Thomas Corey

January 7 - March 25


Philip Pearlstein: A Legacy of Influence features work by legendary figure painter Pearlstein and those he has influenced through his career as an educator.


Philip Pearlstein is an influential American painter best known for Modernist Realism nudes. Cited by critics as the preeminent figure painter of the 1960s to 2000s, he led a revival in realist art. Pearlstein’s work is in over seventy museums’ collections in the United States, including the Art Institute of Chicago, Metropolitan Museum of Art, The Museum of Modern Art, and Whitney Museum of American Art amongst others. Since the mid-1950s Pearlstein has received several awards, most recently, the National Council of Arts Administrators Visual Artist Award; The Benjamin West Clinedinst Memorial Medal, The Artists Fellowship, Inc., New York, NY; and honorary doctorate degrees from Brooklyn College, NY, Center for Creative Studies and the College of Art & Design, Detroit, MI, and New York Academy of Arts, New York, NY. In 1988, he was elected into the National Academy of Design.


“Philip Pearlstein has been an active contributor to the international art scene for over 70 years,” says curator and artist Charles David Viera. “All of the artists in this exhibition have had the opportunity to study under Pearlstein at some point in their careers which allowed them to know him on a more personal level. I speak for all of them when I say that his full legacy of influence has yet to be felt.”


More Exhibitions

Our Universe – From Here to Infinity

“I became interested in astronomy and the nature and scope of our universe when I first started to learn about these things in elementary school. But then decades passed where I focused on other things in life. In 1999, my interest in astronomy was rekindled by my friend/colleague Kirk Alexander who was at the time the Director of the Amateur Astronomers Association of Princeton (AAAP). I bought myself a telescope and a tracking mount and tried to have a visual look at things from the

LUMINOUS MATTER

My work LUMINOUS MATTER channels the forces of fluid dynamics. I achieve this otherworldly look in my artwork by combining pigments, fluids, and additives to produce a physical reaction. Layering different densities of paint leads to the formation of cellular structures that echo natural processes. Some of my results are comparable to phenomena that can be observed in astronomy, such as the Rayleigh-Taylor instability seen in The Crab Nebula. To create my paintings, I myself mimic the forces of nature by using multiple types of

Donor Wheel

More than 2,000 donors are acknowledged in this one-of-a-kind sculpture by Joshua Kirsch

Neighborhood Portrait

The Neighborhood Portrait Quilt is part of a permanent exhibition that tells a story of important leaders and residents.