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Sunday, June 16

LUMINOUS MATTER

My work LUMINOUS MATTER channels the forces of fluid dynamics. I achieve this otherworldly look in my artwork by combining pigments, fluids, and additives to produce a physical reaction. Layering different densities of paint leads to the formation of cellular structures that echo natural processes. Some of my results are comparable to phenomena that can be observed in astronomy, such as the Rayleigh-Taylor instability seen in The Crab Nebula.

To create my paintings, I myself mimic the forces of nature by using multiple types of energy. I use the kinetic movement of my hands and body, generating the power needed to facilitate a chemical reaction in the paint and additives. This chemical reaction itself shapes the structure and design of my work, taking on a life of its own. Finally, I apply heat and fire to my paintings — additional forms of energy — to further induce movement and dynamic interest.

I experiment to discover new ways to generate surprising and exciting results. With this end in mind, my work uses multiple mixed media approaches. Some of the raw materials that I use include acrylic paint, alcohol inks, encaustic paint, pigments, and epoxy resin.

-Fran Eber

OptOutside: Friends of Princeton Open Space Photography Exhibition

 

Each year, Friends of Open Space holds a photo contest that kicks-off during their #OptOutside event the day after Thanksgiving, aka Black Friday, to encourage outdoor time enjoying nature rather than shopping indoors. This OptOutside Photo Exhibition is a culmination of captures from recent years of Princeton’s Billy Johnson Mountain Lakes Nature Preserve taken by amateur and professional photographers alike.

 

About Princeton Open Space (FOPOS):

Now in its 50th year, FOPOS is a nonprofit organization dedicated to acquiring open space in Princeton for preservation, protecting natural resources, maintaining accessibility to trails, and providing environmental education. As part of their mission, they work with groups in the Princeton region to support efforts to preserve and protect open space and the environment.

 

[caption id="attachment_24565" align="aligncenter" width="520"] Toni M. Alfonso, Light on the Waters[/caption] [caption id="attachment_24564" align="aligncenter" width="530"] Sam Mao, The Color of Nature[/caption] [caption id="attachment_24563" align="aligncenter" width="534"] Samuel Vovsi, Looking in the Sky[/caption]

Our Universe - From Here to Infinity

“I became interested in astronomy and the nature and scope of our universe when I first started to learn about these things in elementary school. But then decades passed where I focused on other things in life.

In 1999, my interest in astronomy was rekindled by my friend/colleague Kirk Alexander who was at the time the Director of the Amateur Astronomers Association of Princeton (AAAP). I bought myself a telescope and a tracking mount and tried to have a visual look at things from the backyard at my home about 8 miles north of downtown Princeton. Our Moon and the planets in our Solar System were awesome but most other things were too faint to see without driving a few hours to a darker location. Even at these darker places, most of the faint nebulae did not look nearly as impressive as what I would see published in the various astronomy magazines I was reading on a regular basis.

So, in 2003 I bought myself a digital camera designed for taking long exposure astrophotographs and I began imaging the universe. The star clusters, nebulae, and galaxies that I’ve been able to image from my backyard are stunningly beautiful and it’s been extremely interesting to learn about these objects… what they are, how big and how far away they are, and how they came to be. It is all very interesting and truly humbling.”

-Robert Vanderbei

Waves and Ripples

This project is a celebration of water and a metaphor for life and human emotions.

Monday, June 17

LUMINOUS MATTER

My work LUMINOUS MATTER channels the forces of fluid dynamics. I achieve this otherworldly look in my artwork by combining pigments, fluids, and additives to produce a physical reaction. Layering different densities of paint leads to the formation of cellular structures that echo natural processes. Some of my results are comparable to phenomena that can be observed in astronomy, such as the Rayleigh-Taylor instability seen in The Crab Nebula.

To create my paintings, I myself mimic the forces of nature by using multiple types of energy. I use the kinetic movement of my hands and body, generating the power needed to facilitate a chemical reaction in the paint and additives. This chemical reaction itself shapes the structure and design of my work, taking on a life of its own. Finally, I apply heat and fire to my paintings — additional forms of energy — to further induce movement and dynamic interest.

I experiment to discover new ways to generate surprising and exciting results. With this end in mind, my work uses multiple mixed media approaches. Some of the raw materials that I use include acrylic paint, alcohol inks, encaustic paint, pigments, and epoxy resin.

-Fran Eber

OptOutside: Friends of Princeton Open Space Photography Exhibition

 

Each year, Friends of Open Space holds a photo contest that kicks-off during their #OptOutside event the day after Thanksgiving, aka Black Friday, to encourage outdoor time enjoying nature rather than shopping indoors. This OptOutside Photo Exhibition is a culmination of captures from recent years of Princeton’s Billy Johnson Mountain Lakes Nature Preserve taken by amateur and professional photographers alike.

 

About Princeton Open Space (FOPOS):

Now in its 50th year, FOPOS is a nonprofit organization dedicated to acquiring open space in Princeton for preservation, protecting natural resources, maintaining accessibility to trails, and providing environmental education. As part of their mission, they work with groups in the Princeton region to support efforts to preserve and protect open space and the environment.

 

[caption id="attachment_24565" align="aligncenter" width="520"] Toni M. Alfonso, Light on the Waters[/caption] [caption id="attachment_24564" align="aligncenter" width="530"] Sam Mao, The Color of Nature[/caption] [caption id="attachment_24563" align="aligncenter" width="534"] Samuel Vovsi, Looking in the Sky[/caption]

Our Universe - From Here to Infinity

“I became interested in astronomy and the nature and scope of our universe when I first started to learn about these things in elementary school. But then decades passed where I focused on other things in life.

In 1999, my interest in astronomy was rekindled by my friend/colleague Kirk Alexander who was at the time the Director of the Amateur Astronomers Association of Princeton (AAAP). I bought myself a telescope and a tracking mount and tried to have a visual look at things from the backyard at my home about 8 miles north of downtown Princeton. Our Moon and the planets in our Solar System were awesome but most other things were too faint to see without driving a few hours to a darker location. Even at these darker places, most of the faint nebulae did not look nearly as impressive as what I would see published in the various astronomy magazines I was reading on a regular basis.

So, in 2003 I bought myself a digital camera designed for taking long exposure astrophotographs and I began imaging the universe. The star clusters, nebulae, and galaxies that I’ve been able to image from my backyard are stunningly beautiful and it’s been extremely interesting to learn about these objects… what they are, how big and how far away they are, and how they came to be. It is all very interesting and truly humbling.”

-Robert Vanderbei

Waves and Ripples

This project is a celebration of water and a metaphor for life and human emotions.

Tuesday, June 18

LUMINOUS MATTER

My work LUMINOUS MATTER channels the forces of fluid dynamics. I achieve this otherworldly look in my artwork by combining pigments, fluids, and additives to produce a physical reaction. Layering different densities of paint leads to the formation of cellular structures that echo natural processes. Some of my results are comparable to phenomena that can be observed in astronomy, such as the Rayleigh-Taylor instability seen in The Crab Nebula.

To create my paintings, I myself mimic the forces of nature by using multiple types of energy. I use the kinetic movement of my hands and body, generating the power needed to facilitate a chemical reaction in the paint and additives. This chemical reaction itself shapes the structure and design of my work, taking on a life of its own. Finally, I apply heat and fire to my paintings — additional forms of energy — to further induce movement and dynamic interest.

I experiment to discover new ways to generate surprising and exciting results. With this end in mind, my work uses multiple mixed media approaches. Some of the raw materials that I use include acrylic paint, alcohol inks, encaustic paint, pigments, and epoxy resin.

-Fran Eber

OptOutside: Friends of Princeton Open Space Photography Exhibition

 

Each year, Friends of Open Space holds a photo contest that kicks-off during their #OptOutside event the day after Thanksgiving, aka Black Friday, to encourage outdoor time enjoying nature rather than shopping indoors. This OptOutside Photo Exhibition is a culmination of captures from recent years of Princeton’s Billy Johnson Mountain Lakes Nature Preserve taken by amateur and professional photographers alike.

 

About Princeton Open Space (FOPOS):

Now in its 50th year, FOPOS is a nonprofit organization dedicated to acquiring open space in Princeton for preservation, protecting natural resources, maintaining accessibility to trails, and providing environmental education. As part of their mission, they work with groups in the Princeton region to support efforts to preserve and protect open space and the environment.

 

[caption id="attachment_24565" align="aligncenter" width="520"] Toni M. Alfonso, Light on the Waters[/caption] [caption id="attachment_24564" align="aligncenter" width="530"] Sam Mao, The Color of Nature[/caption] [caption id="attachment_24563" align="aligncenter" width="534"] Samuel Vovsi, Looking in the Sky[/caption]

Our Universe - From Here to Infinity

“I became interested in astronomy and the nature and scope of our universe when I first started to learn about these things in elementary school. But then decades passed where I focused on other things in life.

In 1999, my interest in astronomy was rekindled by my friend/colleague Kirk Alexander who was at the time the Director of the Amateur Astronomers Association of Princeton (AAAP). I bought myself a telescope and a tracking mount and tried to have a visual look at things from the backyard at my home about 8 miles north of downtown Princeton. Our Moon and the planets in our Solar System were awesome but most other things were too faint to see without driving a few hours to a darker location. Even at these darker places, most of the faint nebulae did not look nearly as impressive as what I would see published in the various astronomy magazines I was reading on a regular basis.

So, in 2003 I bought myself a digital camera designed for taking long exposure astrophotographs and I began imaging the universe. The star clusters, nebulae, and galaxies that I’ve been able to image from my backyard are stunningly beautiful and it’s been extremely interesting to learn about these objects… what they are, how big and how far away they are, and how they came to be. It is all very interesting and truly humbling.”

-Robert Vanderbei

Waves and Ripples

This project is a celebration of water and a metaphor for life and human emotions.

Wednesday, June 19

LUMINOUS MATTER

My work LUMINOUS MATTER channels the forces of fluid dynamics. I achieve this otherworldly look in my artwork by combining pigments, fluids, and additives to produce a physical reaction. Layering different densities of paint leads to the formation of cellular structures that echo natural processes. Some of my results are comparable to phenomena that can be observed in astronomy, such as the Rayleigh-Taylor instability seen in The Crab Nebula.

To create my paintings, I myself mimic the forces of nature by using multiple types of energy. I use the kinetic movement of my hands and body, generating the power needed to facilitate a chemical reaction in the paint and additives. This chemical reaction itself shapes the structure and design of my work, taking on a life of its own. Finally, I apply heat and fire to my paintings — additional forms of energy — to further induce movement and dynamic interest.

I experiment to discover new ways to generate surprising and exciting results. With this end in mind, my work uses multiple mixed media approaches. Some of the raw materials that I use include acrylic paint, alcohol inks, encaustic paint, pigments, and epoxy resin.

-Fran Eber

OptOutside: Friends of Princeton Open Space Photography Exhibition

 

Each year, Friends of Open Space holds a photo contest that kicks-off during their #OptOutside event the day after Thanksgiving, aka Black Friday, to encourage outdoor time enjoying nature rather than shopping indoors. This OptOutside Photo Exhibition is a culmination of captures from recent years of Princeton’s Billy Johnson Mountain Lakes Nature Preserve taken by amateur and professional photographers alike.

 

About Princeton Open Space (FOPOS):

Now in its 50th year, FOPOS is a nonprofit organization dedicated to acquiring open space in Princeton for preservation, protecting natural resources, maintaining accessibility to trails, and providing environmental education. As part of their mission, they work with groups in the Princeton region to support efforts to preserve and protect open space and the environment.

 

[caption id="attachment_24565" align="aligncenter" width="520"] Toni M. Alfonso, Light on the Waters[/caption] [caption id="attachment_24564" align="aligncenter" width="530"] Sam Mao, The Color of Nature[/caption] [caption id="attachment_24563" align="aligncenter" width="534"] Samuel Vovsi, Looking in the Sky[/caption]

Our Universe - From Here to Infinity

“I became interested in astronomy and the nature and scope of our universe when I first started to learn about these things in elementary school. But then decades passed where I focused on other things in life.

In 1999, my interest in astronomy was rekindled by my friend/colleague Kirk Alexander who was at the time the Director of the Amateur Astronomers Association of Princeton (AAAP). I bought myself a telescope and a tracking mount and tried to have a visual look at things from the backyard at my home about 8 miles north of downtown Princeton. Our Moon and the planets in our Solar System were awesome but most other things were too faint to see without driving a few hours to a darker location. Even at these darker places, most of the faint nebulae did not look nearly as impressive as what I would see published in the various astronomy magazines I was reading on a regular basis.

So, in 2003 I bought myself a digital camera designed for taking long exposure astrophotographs and I began imaging the universe. The star clusters, nebulae, and galaxies that I’ve been able to image from my backyard are stunningly beautiful and it’s been extremely interesting to learn about these objects… what they are, how big and how far away they are, and how they came to be. It is all very interesting and truly humbling.”

-Robert Vanderbei

Waves and Ripples

This project is a celebration of water and a metaphor for life and human emotions.

Thursday, June 20

LUMINOUS MATTER

My work LUMINOUS MATTER channels the forces of fluid dynamics. I achieve this otherworldly look in my artwork by combining pigments, fluids, and additives to produce a physical reaction. Layering different densities of paint leads to the formation of cellular structures that echo natural processes. Some of my results are comparable to phenomena that can be observed in astronomy, such as the Rayleigh-Taylor instability seen in The Crab Nebula.

To create my paintings, I myself mimic the forces of nature by using multiple types of energy. I use the kinetic movement of my hands and body, generating the power needed to facilitate a chemical reaction in the paint and additives. This chemical reaction itself shapes the structure and design of my work, taking on a life of its own. Finally, I apply heat and fire to my paintings — additional forms of energy — to further induce movement and dynamic interest.

I experiment to discover new ways to generate surprising and exciting results. With this end in mind, my work uses multiple mixed media approaches. Some of the raw materials that I use include acrylic paint, alcohol inks, encaustic paint, pigments, and epoxy resin.

-Fran Eber

OptOutside: Friends of Princeton Open Space Photography Exhibition

 

Each year, Friends of Open Space holds a photo contest that kicks-off during their #OptOutside event the day after Thanksgiving, aka Black Friday, to encourage outdoor time enjoying nature rather than shopping indoors. This OptOutside Photo Exhibition is a culmination of captures from recent years of Princeton’s Billy Johnson Mountain Lakes Nature Preserve taken by amateur and professional photographers alike.

 

About Princeton Open Space (FOPOS):

Now in its 50th year, FOPOS is a nonprofit organization dedicated to acquiring open space in Princeton for preservation, protecting natural resources, maintaining accessibility to trails, and providing environmental education. As part of their mission, they work with groups in the Princeton region to support efforts to preserve and protect open space and the environment.

 

[caption id="attachment_24565" align="aligncenter" width="520"] Toni M. Alfonso, Light on the Waters[/caption] [caption id="attachment_24564" align="aligncenter" width="530"] Sam Mao, The Color of Nature[/caption] [caption id="attachment_24563" align="aligncenter" width="534"] Samuel Vovsi, Looking in the Sky[/caption]

Our Universe - From Here to Infinity

“I became interested in astronomy and the nature and scope of our universe when I first started to learn about these things in elementary school. But then decades passed where I focused on other things in life.

In 1999, my interest in astronomy was rekindled by my friend/colleague Kirk Alexander who was at the time the Director of the Amateur Astronomers Association of Princeton (AAAP). I bought myself a telescope and a tracking mount and tried to have a visual look at things from the backyard at my home about 8 miles north of downtown Princeton. Our Moon and the planets in our Solar System were awesome but most other things were too faint to see without driving a few hours to a darker location. Even at these darker places, most of the faint nebulae did not look nearly as impressive as what I would see published in the various astronomy magazines I was reading on a regular basis.

So, in 2003 I bought myself a digital camera designed for taking long exposure astrophotographs and I began imaging the universe. The star clusters, nebulae, and galaxies that I’ve been able to image from my backyard are stunningly beautiful and it’s been extremely interesting to learn about these objects… what they are, how big and how far away they are, and how they came to be. It is all very interesting and truly humbling.”

-Robert Vanderbei

Waves and Ripples

This project is a celebration of water and a metaphor for life and human emotions.

Friday, June 21

Dance, Princeton, Dance: PRIDE Party

- Suggested donation: $5

The Arts Council of Princeton and the Bayard Rustin Center for Social Justice invite you to a Pride Dance Party in conjunction with Pride Parade- Princeton’s Fabulous First Ever!
The ACP’s Solley Theater will transform into a dance party with tunes, snacks, and best of all, a celebration of community!

Special guests include Mike Hot-Pence and Miss Gay NJ Lady Victoria Courtez who will also be performing a few special numbers during the dance!
Shimmy, shake, and show your pride! ALL are welcome.

Thank you to our fabulous Party Partners:
Bayard Rustin Center for Social Justice
Princeton Record Exchange
Small World Coffee
The Bent Spoon
Labyrinth Books Princeton
Olives Princeton

LUMINOUS MATTER

My work LUMINOUS MATTER channels the forces of fluid dynamics. I achieve this otherworldly look in my artwork by combining pigments, fluids, and additives to produce a physical reaction. Layering different densities of paint leads to the formation of cellular structures that echo natural processes. Some of my results are comparable to phenomena that can be observed in astronomy, such as the Rayleigh-Taylor instability seen in The Crab Nebula.

To create my paintings, I myself mimic the forces of nature by using multiple types of energy. I use the kinetic movement of my hands and body, generating the power needed to facilitate a chemical reaction in the paint and additives. This chemical reaction itself shapes the structure and design of my work, taking on a life of its own. Finally, I apply heat and fire to my paintings — additional forms of energy — to further induce movement and dynamic interest.

I experiment to discover new ways to generate surprising and exciting results. With this end in mind, my work uses multiple mixed media approaches. Some of the raw materials that I use include acrylic paint, alcohol inks, encaustic paint, pigments, and epoxy resin.

-Fran Eber

OptOutside: Friends of Princeton Open Space Photography Exhibition

 

Each year, Friends of Open Space holds a photo contest that kicks-off during their #OptOutside event the day after Thanksgiving, aka Black Friday, to encourage outdoor time enjoying nature rather than shopping indoors. This OptOutside Photo Exhibition is a culmination of captures from recent years of Princeton’s Billy Johnson Mountain Lakes Nature Preserve taken by amateur and professional photographers alike.

 

About Princeton Open Space (FOPOS):

Now in its 50th year, FOPOS is a nonprofit organization dedicated to acquiring open space in Princeton for preservation, protecting natural resources, maintaining accessibility to trails, and providing environmental education. As part of their mission, they work with groups in the Princeton region to support efforts to preserve and protect open space and the environment.

 

[caption id="attachment_24565" align="aligncenter" width="520"] Toni M. Alfonso, Light on the Waters[/caption] [caption id="attachment_24564" align="aligncenter" width="530"] Sam Mao, The Color of Nature[/caption] [caption id="attachment_24563" align="aligncenter" width="534"] Samuel Vovsi, Looking in the Sky[/caption]

Our Universe - From Here to Infinity

“I became interested in astronomy and the nature and scope of our universe when I first started to learn about these things in elementary school. But then decades passed where I focused on other things in life.

In 1999, my interest in astronomy was rekindled by my friend/colleague Kirk Alexander who was at the time the Director of the Amateur Astronomers Association of Princeton (AAAP). I bought myself a telescope and a tracking mount and tried to have a visual look at things from the backyard at my home about 8 miles north of downtown Princeton. Our Moon and the planets in our Solar System were awesome but most other things were too faint to see without driving a few hours to a darker location. Even at these darker places, most of the faint nebulae did not look nearly as impressive as what I would see published in the various astronomy magazines I was reading on a regular basis.

So, in 2003 I bought myself a digital camera designed for taking long exposure astrophotographs and I began imaging the universe. The star clusters, nebulae, and galaxies that I’ve been able to image from my backyard are stunningly beautiful and it’s been extremely interesting to learn about these objects… what they are, how big and how far away they are, and how they came to be. It is all very interesting and truly humbling.”

-Robert Vanderbei

Waves and Ripples

This project is a celebration of water and a metaphor for life and human emotions.

Saturday, June 22

Waves and Ripples: Live Painting & Music Event

-

In conjunction with Waves and Ripples, Christina Gullans, an accomplished cellist, will perform a collection of movements from Bach’s Cello Suites and a selection of complementary works written by living composers, creating an experience that brings us closer to one another and highlights nature as an endless source of inspiration.

Waves and Ripples is a celebration of water and a metaphor for life and human emotions. Water is tumultuous, mysterious and beautiful. Just like life, it comes in big unexpected waves and gentle calming ripples. The artists seek to capture these qualities on canvas and invite their viewers to take a moment and reflect on our connection with this vital natural resource. The exhibition also aims to foster a dialog regarding water as the quintessential component of life.

Cafe Improv: Community Stage Event

- $1 ACP Members; $2 General Admission

For the past 25 years, Café Improv has connected beginning and professional performers in the ACP’s Solley Theater. Attendees can expect an evening of exciting local music, poetry, comedy, and more. Café Improv is easily accessible to the public through affordable admission rates and televised broadcasts on Princeton Community Television. Click here to learn more and/or register to play!

This performance is part of the Arts Council of Princeton’s Community Stage Series. Community Stage productions are free (and nearly free) held in collaboration with local artistic groups and organizations. Community Stage programming enable the Arts Council’s Solley Theater to act as an accessible space for community partnerships and high-quality artistic experiences.

LUMINOUS MATTER

My work LUMINOUS MATTER channels the forces of fluid dynamics. I achieve this otherworldly look in my artwork by combining pigments, fluids, and additives to produce a physical reaction. Layering different densities of paint leads to the formation of cellular structures that echo natural processes. Some of my results are comparable to phenomena that can be observed in astronomy, such as the Rayleigh-Taylor instability seen in The Crab Nebula.

To create my paintings, I myself mimic the forces of nature by using multiple types of energy. I use the kinetic movement of my hands and body, generating the power needed to facilitate a chemical reaction in the paint and additives. This chemical reaction itself shapes the structure and design of my work, taking on a life of its own. Finally, I apply heat and fire to my paintings — additional forms of energy — to further induce movement and dynamic interest.

I experiment to discover new ways to generate surprising and exciting results. With this end in mind, my work uses multiple mixed media approaches. Some of the raw materials that I use include acrylic paint, alcohol inks, encaustic paint, pigments, and epoxy resin.

-Fran Eber

OptOutside: Friends of Princeton Open Space Photography Exhibition

 

Each year, Friends of Open Space holds a photo contest that kicks-off during their #OptOutside event the day after Thanksgiving, aka Black Friday, to encourage outdoor time enjoying nature rather than shopping indoors. This OptOutside Photo Exhibition is a culmination of captures from recent years of Princeton’s Billy Johnson Mountain Lakes Nature Preserve taken by amateur and professional photographers alike.

 

About Princeton Open Space (FOPOS):

Now in its 50th year, FOPOS is a nonprofit organization dedicated to acquiring open space in Princeton for preservation, protecting natural resources, maintaining accessibility to trails, and providing environmental education. As part of their mission, they work with groups in the Princeton region to support efforts to preserve and protect open space and the environment.

 

[caption id="attachment_24565" align="aligncenter" width="520"] Toni M. Alfonso, Light on the Waters[/caption] [caption id="attachment_24564" align="aligncenter" width="530"] Sam Mao, The Color of Nature[/caption] [caption id="attachment_24563" align="aligncenter" width="534"] Samuel Vovsi, Looking in the Sky[/caption]

Our Universe - From Here to Infinity

“I became interested in astronomy and the nature and scope of our universe when I first started to learn about these things in elementary school. But then decades passed where I focused on other things in life.

In 1999, my interest in astronomy was rekindled by my friend/colleague Kirk Alexander who was at the time the Director of the Amateur Astronomers Association of Princeton (AAAP). I bought myself a telescope and a tracking mount and tried to have a visual look at things from the backyard at my home about 8 miles north of downtown Princeton. Our Moon and the planets in our Solar System were awesome but most other things were too faint to see without driving a few hours to a darker location. Even at these darker places, most of the faint nebulae did not look nearly as impressive as what I would see published in the various astronomy magazines I was reading on a regular basis.

So, in 2003 I bought myself a digital camera designed for taking long exposure astrophotographs and I began imaging the universe. The star clusters, nebulae, and galaxies that I’ve been able to image from my backyard are stunningly beautiful and it’s been extremely interesting to learn about these objects… what they are, how big and how far away they are, and how they came to be. It is all very interesting and truly humbling.”

-Robert Vanderbei

Waves and Ripples

This project is a celebration of water and a metaphor for life and human emotions.