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Friday, September 17

Story & Verse: A Storytelling and Poetic Open Mic - "The Way We Were"

- Free & open to the public!

Enjoy an evening of community-created entertainment in the form of storytelling and poetic open mic. All are welcome to tell a well-prepared story or perform their poetry. Each month, we’ll be inviting inspiration from a well-known song title.  Artists are invited to interpret the theme as broadly as they wish. Performers should bring their own work, inspired by this month’s theme: The Way We Were.

The evening will include 45 minutes of stories and 45 minutes of poetry with a brief intermission.

Doors: 7pm
Stories begin: 7:30pm

Performer Details

  • Performers will be randomly selected from names in a ‘hat’.
  • Storytellers should prepare a 5-minute story on the theme, true and about the teller. Storytellers should follow “The Moth” guidelines
  • Poets should perform their own poetry, up to 5 minutes in length, related to the theme.
  • Performers will be selected at random, so it’s possible that not everyone will get to perform.

FREE RSVP HERE

Constant Repeating Themes

[caption id="attachment_30867" align="aligncenter" width="600"] .[/caption]

 

As a photographer, the themes of urban landscape and man’s impact on the environment have long intrigued me both artistically and intellectually. I witness this in constructions as simple as building façades in a strip mall to the deserted athletic fields in parks and playgrounds. 

 

Through my viewfinder I seek to contrast and compare the interactions of natural and man-made elements. I tend to seek out landscapes that speak to a certain stillness. In the buildings and structures that I photograph, I emphasize their architectural quality in the space that they exist. Geometry, shadow and light play major roles in my image making. I consider my work to be informed by traditional landscape. My interpretation reflects a sense of solitude that I wish to convey on to the viewer.

 

– Aubrey J. Kauffman

Princeton Together

For four or five years, I have been documenting the Princeton community. I have roamed the streets looking for scenes of daily life, and have gone to many special events. Most of the events pictured in this show were presented by the Arts Council! Among the events included in this show are the Halloween Parade, the Bollywood festival, and the Day of the Dead, as well as demonstrations in support of immigrant rights and the need to protect our environment. My hope is that this exhibit shows the wonderful diversity we have in this community and the ways that various groups support each other to both inform and entertain.

 

 

ABOUT THE ARTIST

My photographs are my visual diary. They record what I see at the time and reflect many of the experiences I have had over my lifetime. Most evident is my interest in people, especially children. Those are the interests which led me to be an elementary and secondary level teacher for most of my professional life. My other interests are Art and Architecture. I have worked both in an Art Gallery and in museums.

 

Cities provide me with endless opportunities to photograph people in a variety of environments. New York is a short bus ride from my home. Photographing there has led me to explore Urban life in several other countries. I have benefitted from participating in workshops in Paris, Rome, and Normandy (with Valerie Jardin), in Havana (with Doug Kaye), in Milan (with Steve Simon and Ugo Cei).

 

In addition, I have taken workshops in New York with Steve Simon, Valerie Jardin, Bob Sacha (through National Geographic Expeditions), and at the International Center of Photography with Karen Marshall, Jade Doskow, Richard Rothman, and Anja Hitzenberger.

 

I have also attended workshops in Miami (with Stella Johnson and Magdalena Sole at Street Photo Miami), in Boston (with Stella Johnson through Leica Academy), and in Rockport, Maine (with Peter Turnley, Karen Marshall, Vincent Versace, Jay Maisel, David Julian, Stella Johnson and Magdalena Sole at Maine Media Workshops).

 

In addition to attending travel workshops I have benefitted from participating in online workshops with Anja Hitzenberger, Edward Ratliff, Christine Callahan, Kai McBride, and Stefan Frank through Studelmedialive. I have also participated in online workshops with Vneet Vohra Through Miami Street Photography Festival, with Sarah Stolka and Jill Galloway Sherman at Philadelphia Photo Arts Center, with Arlene Collins through Maine Media and with Quinton Gordon through Leica Akademie.

 

I photograph with the Fuji XT-3, using 16mm,18mm, 23mm, 35mm lenses, and 56mm lenses. I also photograph with Fuji X100v. My post-processing is minimal. I use Lightroom, and D x O plug-ins. My goal is not to change or create the scene but to record it as unobtrusively as possible.

Taking Pause

[embed]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7eiuc3zG9NI[/embed]

Video courtesy of the Princeton University Humanities Council 

 

Taking Pause is a documentary portrait project created by ACP Artist-in-Residence Robin Resch that asks people to reflect on what in their lives feels most essential. The project is on view in Princeton’s Dohm Alley from April-October 2021.

 

With what do we identify and connect most deeply? What truly matters to us, and why?   

 

This series seeks to create telling portraits of people through what is deeply meaningful to them. To make these portraits, photographer Resch ask each participant the same simple thought-provoking question: “what is irreplaceable to you?”

 

Each person is documented with two distinct portraits.  One of their physical self and another of their reflective self, through what they have chosen to share. It is a collaborative project as those who participate are more than passing subjects. In addition to sharing something of deep personal resonance, each participant also tells the story behind what they chose and engages others to take part in the project. 

 

Taking Pause combines photographs and stories in a visual and verbal narrative that explores the complexities and simplicities of what we value. The intent is to document the differences and commonalities of these choices while engaging the spectrum of American diversity and disconnections.

 

Work on this series began in early 2018 with a core group of participants from varying backgrounds. Between November 2018 and March 2019, Resch began to expand the project’s community and network exponentially by working with people across the United States, driving solo 10,553 miles from East to West along a southerly route that naturally evolved and was largely determined by the location of the contributors. Resch’s goal for this Princeton manifestation of her Taking Pause project is to capture as broad a spectrum of the local community as possible. 

 

“Our lives are so diverse and we’ve all been impacted in similar and yet differing ways,” says Resch. “To some degree, it has been equalizing. In other ways it’s been polarizing. How has it impacted us? Have our values changed? Would we answer the question ‘what is irreplaceable to you?’ differently today than a year ago?”  Her hope is to sow seeds for a conversation that may help heal in such a challenging time and that as a collaborative project, Taking Pause may help rebuild trust by addressing our fears and fostering communication and reflection.

 

Resch’s work with each participant culminates in two photos and their brief written text, creating a finished portrait set. Five portrait sets will be printed on vinyl banners and be displayed in Dohm Alley, located near the corner of Nassau and Witherspoon streets, from April to October 2021, as a public art display, free and open to the public.

 

Robin Resch is a Princeton-based photographer who lived in Italy, France, and the Netherlands until 1998. She left Europe to pursue her Master’s in Architecture at Princeton University, which she combined with advanced photographic studies with Emmet Gowin and Andrew Moore. Her architectural training informs her documentary photographic work as she is particularly interested in making images that are about and their personal environments as well as the impact on our collective environments. Her landscape photography, which is more abstract, seeks to explore our human experience of the natural environment.

 

Resch’s work has been exhibited at Princeton University’s Lucas Gallery, the Pringle Gallery in Philadelphia, Design Within Reach, Princeton Project Space, the Arts Council of Princeton, and the Nassau Club. Her photographs have been published in the New York Times, the Witte de With Cahiers, the Rotterdams Dagblad, Italian GQ, and Princeton Magazine. Robin has maintained an active portrait studio since 2003. In 2012, she was honored to be the exclusive campaign photographer for the Princeton fundraising event with First Lady Michelle Obama.

Saturday, September 18

Fall Open House 2021

- Free and open to the public!
[caption id="attachment_31786" align="alignnone" width="600"] .[/caption]

The Arts Council of Princeton invites our community to join us for an afternoon of hands-on fun. The main event: the inaugural ACP Pottery Throwdown where you can watch as ceramic artists compete in fun challenges on the pottery wheel!

 

PLUS:

  • Mural-making

  • Studio tours and artist demos

  • ACP swag giveaways

  • Gallery exhibition featuring photography by Aubrey J. Kauffman

  • and MORE!

Constant Repeating Themes

[caption id="attachment_30867" align="aligncenter" width="600"] .[/caption]

 

As a photographer, the themes of urban landscape and man’s impact on the environment have long intrigued me both artistically and intellectually. I witness this in constructions as simple as building façades in a strip mall to the deserted athletic fields in parks and playgrounds. 

 

Through my viewfinder I seek to contrast and compare the interactions of natural and man-made elements. I tend to seek out landscapes that speak to a certain stillness. In the buildings and structures that I photograph, I emphasize their architectural quality in the space that they exist. Geometry, shadow and light play major roles in my image making. I consider my work to be informed by traditional landscape. My interpretation reflects a sense of solitude that I wish to convey on to the viewer.

 

– Aubrey J. Kauffman

Princeton Together

For four or five years, I have been documenting the Princeton community. I have roamed the streets looking for scenes of daily life, and have gone to many special events. Most of the events pictured in this show were presented by the Arts Council! Among the events included in this show are the Halloween Parade, the Bollywood festival, and the Day of the Dead, as well as demonstrations in support of immigrant rights and the need to protect our environment. My hope is that this exhibit shows the wonderful diversity we have in this community and the ways that various groups support each other to both inform and entertain.

 

 

ABOUT THE ARTIST

My photographs are my visual diary. They record what I see at the time and reflect many of the experiences I have had over my lifetime. Most evident is my interest in people, especially children. Those are the interests which led me to be an elementary and secondary level teacher for most of my professional life. My other interests are Art and Architecture. I have worked both in an Art Gallery and in museums.

 

Cities provide me with endless opportunities to photograph people in a variety of environments. New York is a short bus ride from my home. Photographing there has led me to explore Urban life in several other countries. I have benefitted from participating in workshops in Paris, Rome, and Normandy (with Valerie Jardin), in Havana (with Doug Kaye), in Milan (with Steve Simon and Ugo Cei).

 

In addition, I have taken workshops in New York with Steve Simon, Valerie Jardin, Bob Sacha (through National Geographic Expeditions), and at the International Center of Photography with Karen Marshall, Jade Doskow, Richard Rothman, and Anja Hitzenberger.

 

I have also attended workshops in Miami (with Stella Johnson and Magdalena Sole at Street Photo Miami), in Boston (with Stella Johnson through Leica Academy), and in Rockport, Maine (with Peter Turnley, Karen Marshall, Vincent Versace, Jay Maisel, David Julian, Stella Johnson and Magdalena Sole at Maine Media Workshops).

 

In addition to attending travel workshops I have benefitted from participating in online workshops with Anja Hitzenberger, Edward Ratliff, Christine Callahan, Kai McBride, and Stefan Frank through Studelmedialive. I have also participated in online workshops with Vneet Vohra Through Miami Street Photography Festival, with Sarah Stolka and Jill Galloway Sherman at Philadelphia Photo Arts Center, with Arlene Collins through Maine Media and with Quinton Gordon through Leica Akademie.

 

I photograph with the Fuji XT-3, using 16mm,18mm, 23mm, 35mm lenses, and 56mm lenses. I also photograph with Fuji X100v. My post-processing is minimal. I use Lightroom, and D x O plug-ins. My goal is not to change or create the scene but to record it as unobtrusively as possible.

Taking Pause

[embed]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7eiuc3zG9NI[/embed]

Video courtesy of the Princeton University Humanities Council 

 

Taking Pause is a documentary portrait project created by ACP Artist-in-Residence Robin Resch that asks people to reflect on what in their lives feels most essential. The project is on view in Princeton’s Dohm Alley from April-October 2021.

 

With what do we identify and connect most deeply? What truly matters to us, and why?   

 

This series seeks to create telling portraits of people through what is deeply meaningful to them. To make these portraits, photographer Resch ask each participant the same simple thought-provoking question: “what is irreplaceable to you?”

 

Each person is documented with two distinct portraits.  One of their physical self and another of their reflective self, through what they have chosen to share. It is a collaborative project as those who participate are more than passing subjects. In addition to sharing something of deep personal resonance, each participant also tells the story behind what they chose and engages others to take part in the project. 

 

Taking Pause combines photographs and stories in a visual and verbal narrative that explores the complexities and simplicities of what we value. The intent is to document the differences and commonalities of these choices while engaging the spectrum of American diversity and disconnections.

 

Work on this series began in early 2018 with a core group of participants from varying backgrounds. Between November 2018 and March 2019, Resch began to expand the project’s community and network exponentially by working with people across the United States, driving solo 10,553 miles from East to West along a southerly route that naturally evolved and was largely determined by the location of the contributors. Resch’s goal for this Princeton manifestation of her Taking Pause project is to capture as broad a spectrum of the local community as possible. 

 

“Our lives are so diverse and we’ve all been impacted in similar and yet differing ways,” says Resch. “To some degree, it has been equalizing. In other ways it’s been polarizing. How has it impacted us? Have our values changed? Would we answer the question ‘what is irreplaceable to you?’ differently today than a year ago?”  Her hope is to sow seeds for a conversation that may help heal in such a challenging time and that as a collaborative project, Taking Pause may help rebuild trust by addressing our fears and fostering communication and reflection.

 

Resch’s work with each participant culminates in two photos and their brief written text, creating a finished portrait set. Five portrait sets will be printed on vinyl banners and be displayed in Dohm Alley, located near the corner of Nassau and Witherspoon streets, from April to October 2021, as a public art display, free and open to the public.

 

Robin Resch is a Princeton-based photographer who lived in Italy, France, and the Netherlands until 1998. She left Europe to pursue her Master’s in Architecture at Princeton University, which she combined with advanced photographic studies with Emmet Gowin and Andrew Moore. Her architectural training informs her documentary photographic work as she is particularly interested in making images that are about and their personal environments as well as the impact on our collective environments. Her landscape photography, which is more abstract, seeks to explore our human experience of the natural environment.

 

Resch’s work has been exhibited at Princeton University’s Lucas Gallery, the Pringle Gallery in Philadelphia, Design Within Reach, Princeton Project Space, the Arts Council of Princeton, and the Nassau Club. Her photographs have been published in the New York Times, the Witte de With Cahiers, the Rotterdams Dagblad, Italian GQ, and Princeton Magazine. Robin has maintained an active portrait studio since 2003. In 2012, she was honored to be the exclusive campaign photographer for the Princeton fundraising event with First Lady Michelle Obama.

Sunday, September 19

Film Screening: Sukkah City

- Free and open to the public!
[embed]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vQY-Vx5tNpw[/embed]

 

 

In partnership with Princeton’s Sukkah Village, the Arts Council will screen the film Sukkah City by Jason Hutt in our Solley Theater.   

 

When best-selling author Joshua Foer (Moonwalking With Einstein) began to build his first sukkah, a small hut that Jews build and dwell in every fall for the holiday of Sukkot, he wanted to move beyond the generic plywood boxes and canvas tents that have become the unimaginative status quo. He discovered that while the bible outlines the basic parameters for what a sukkah should look like and how it should function, it leaves plenty of room for variation and interpretation. Foer thought, what if contemporary architects and designers were challenged to design and construct twelve radical sukkahs? What would they come up with? And so was born the design competition and exhibition known as “Sukkah City.” The film tracks the competition from jury day, as an all-star cast of architects, academics and critics (Thom Mayne, Paul Goldberger, Ron Arad) debate the merits of the 600 submissions; to the construction, installation and exhibition of the twelve winning structures in Union Square in the heart of New York City; and the critical and popular response of some of the 200,000 New Yorkers who attended the two-day exhibition. The film explores the artistic process of architects, provides an entertaining and inspiring portrait of the project’s visionary architects, planners and structures and celebrates an exciting, singular moment in the American Jewish experience.

 

[caption id="attachment_31881" align="alignnone" width="300"] .[/caption] [caption id="attachment_31882" align="alignnone" width="300"] .[/caption]

This event is held in part of a series of community programs — learn more!

Constant Repeating Themes

[caption id="attachment_30867" align="aligncenter" width="600"] .[/caption]

 

As a photographer, the themes of urban landscape and man’s impact on the environment have long intrigued me both artistically and intellectually. I witness this in constructions as simple as building façades in a strip mall to the deserted athletic fields in parks and playgrounds. 

 

Through my viewfinder I seek to contrast and compare the interactions of natural and man-made elements. I tend to seek out landscapes that speak to a certain stillness. In the buildings and structures that I photograph, I emphasize their architectural quality in the space that they exist. Geometry, shadow and light play major roles in my image making. I consider my work to be informed by traditional landscape. My interpretation reflects a sense of solitude that I wish to convey on to the viewer.

 

– Aubrey J. Kauffman

Princeton Together

For four or five years, I have been documenting the Princeton community. I have roamed the streets looking for scenes of daily life, and have gone to many special events. Most of the events pictured in this show were presented by the Arts Council! Among the events included in this show are the Halloween Parade, the Bollywood festival, and the Day of the Dead, as well as demonstrations in support of immigrant rights and the need to protect our environment. My hope is that this exhibit shows the wonderful diversity we have in this community and the ways that various groups support each other to both inform and entertain.

 

 

ABOUT THE ARTIST

My photographs are my visual diary. They record what I see at the time and reflect many of the experiences I have had over my lifetime. Most evident is my interest in people, especially children. Those are the interests which led me to be an elementary and secondary level teacher for most of my professional life. My other interests are Art and Architecture. I have worked both in an Art Gallery and in museums.

 

Cities provide me with endless opportunities to photograph people in a variety of environments. New York is a short bus ride from my home. Photographing there has led me to explore Urban life in several other countries. I have benefitted from participating in workshops in Paris, Rome, and Normandy (with Valerie Jardin), in Havana (with Doug Kaye), in Milan (with Steve Simon and Ugo Cei).

 

In addition, I have taken workshops in New York with Steve Simon, Valerie Jardin, Bob Sacha (through National Geographic Expeditions), and at the International Center of Photography with Karen Marshall, Jade Doskow, Richard Rothman, and Anja Hitzenberger.

 

I have also attended workshops in Miami (with Stella Johnson and Magdalena Sole at Street Photo Miami), in Boston (with Stella Johnson through Leica Academy), and in Rockport, Maine (with Peter Turnley, Karen Marshall, Vincent Versace, Jay Maisel, David Julian, Stella Johnson and Magdalena Sole at Maine Media Workshops).

 

In addition to attending travel workshops I have benefitted from participating in online workshops with Anja Hitzenberger, Edward Ratliff, Christine Callahan, Kai McBride, and Stefan Frank through Studelmedialive. I have also participated in online workshops with Vneet Vohra Through Miami Street Photography Festival, with Sarah Stolka and Jill Galloway Sherman at Philadelphia Photo Arts Center, with Arlene Collins through Maine Media and with Quinton Gordon through Leica Akademie.

 

I photograph with the Fuji XT-3, using 16mm,18mm, 23mm, 35mm lenses, and 56mm lenses. I also photograph with Fuji X100v. My post-processing is minimal. I use Lightroom, and D x O plug-ins. My goal is not to change or create the scene but to record it as unobtrusively as possible.

Taking Pause

[embed]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7eiuc3zG9NI[/embed]

Video courtesy of the Princeton University Humanities Council 

 

Taking Pause is a documentary portrait project created by ACP Artist-in-Residence Robin Resch that asks people to reflect on what in their lives feels most essential. The project is on view in Princeton’s Dohm Alley from April-October 2021.

 

With what do we identify and connect most deeply? What truly matters to us, and why?   

 

This series seeks to create telling portraits of people through what is deeply meaningful to them. To make these portraits, photographer Resch ask each participant the same simple thought-provoking question: “what is irreplaceable to you?”

 

Each person is documented with two distinct portraits.  One of their physical self and another of their reflective self, through what they have chosen to share. It is a collaborative project as those who participate are more than passing subjects. In addition to sharing something of deep personal resonance, each participant also tells the story behind what they chose and engages others to take part in the project. 

 

Taking Pause combines photographs and stories in a visual and verbal narrative that explores the complexities and simplicities of what we value. The intent is to document the differences and commonalities of these choices while engaging the spectrum of American diversity and disconnections.

 

Work on this series began in early 2018 with a core group of participants from varying backgrounds. Between November 2018 and March 2019, Resch began to expand the project’s community and network exponentially by working with people across the United States, driving solo 10,553 miles from East to West along a southerly route that naturally evolved and was largely determined by the location of the contributors. Resch’s goal for this Princeton manifestation of her Taking Pause project is to capture as broad a spectrum of the local community as possible. 

 

“Our lives are so diverse and we’ve all been impacted in similar and yet differing ways,” says Resch. “To some degree, it has been equalizing. In other ways it’s been polarizing. How has it impacted us? Have our values changed? Would we answer the question ‘what is irreplaceable to you?’ differently today than a year ago?”  Her hope is to sow seeds for a conversation that may help heal in such a challenging time and that as a collaborative project, Taking Pause may help rebuild trust by addressing our fears and fostering communication and reflection.

 

Resch’s work with each participant culminates in two photos and their brief written text, creating a finished portrait set. Five portrait sets will be printed on vinyl banners and be displayed in Dohm Alley, located near the corner of Nassau and Witherspoon streets, from April to October 2021, as a public art display, free and open to the public.

 

Robin Resch is a Princeton-based photographer who lived in Italy, France, and the Netherlands until 1998. She left Europe to pursue her Master’s in Architecture at Princeton University, which she combined with advanced photographic studies with Emmet Gowin and Andrew Moore. Her architectural training informs her documentary photographic work as she is particularly interested in making images that are about and their personal environments as well as the impact on our collective environments. Her landscape photography, which is more abstract, seeks to explore our human experience of the natural environment.

 

Resch’s work has been exhibited at Princeton University’s Lucas Gallery, the Pringle Gallery in Philadelphia, Design Within Reach, Princeton Project Space, the Arts Council of Princeton, and the Nassau Club. Her photographs have been published in the New York Times, the Witte de With Cahiers, the Rotterdams Dagblad, Italian GQ, and Princeton Magazine. Robin has maintained an active portrait studio since 2003. In 2012, she was honored to be the exclusive campaign photographer for the Princeton fundraising event with First Lady Michelle Obama.

Monday, September 20

Constant Repeating Themes

[caption id="attachment_30867" align="aligncenter" width="600"] .[/caption]

 

As a photographer, the themes of urban landscape and man’s impact on the environment have long intrigued me both artistically and intellectually. I witness this in constructions as simple as building façades in a strip mall to the deserted athletic fields in parks and playgrounds. 

 

Through my viewfinder I seek to contrast and compare the interactions of natural and man-made elements. I tend to seek out landscapes that speak to a certain stillness. In the buildings and structures that I photograph, I emphasize their architectural quality in the space that they exist. Geometry, shadow and light play major roles in my image making. I consider my work to be informed by traditional landscape. My interpretation reflects a sense of solitude that I wish to convey on to the viewer.

 

– Aubrey J. Kauffman

Princeton Together

For four or five years, I have been documenting the Princeton community. I have roamed the streets looking for scenes of daily life, and have gone to many special events. Most of the events pictured in this show were presented by the Arts Council! Among the events included in this show are the Halloween Parade, the Bollywood festival, and the Day of the Dead, as well as demonstrations in support of immigrant rights and the need to protect our environment. My hope is that this exhibit shows the wonderful diversity we have in this community and the ways that various groups support each other to both inform and entertain.

 

 

ABOUT THE ARTIST

My photographs are my visual diary. They record what I see at the time and reflect many of the experiences I have had over my lifetime. Most evident is my interest in people, especially children. Those are the interests which led me to be an elementary and secondary level teacher for most of my professional life. My other interests are Art and Architecture. I have worked both in an Art Gallery and in museums.

 

Cities provide me with endless opportunities to photograph people in a variety of environments. New York is a short bus ride from my home. Photographing there has led me to explore Urban life in several other countries. I have benefitted from participating in workshops in Paris, Rome, and Normandy (with Valerie Jardin), in Havana (with Doug Kaye), in Milan (with Steve Simon and Ugo Cei).

 

In addition, I have taken workshops in New York with Steve Simon, Valerie Jardin, Bob Sacha (through National Geographic Expeditions), and at the International Center of Photography with Karen Marshall, Jade Doskow, Richard Rothman, and Anja Hitzenberger.

 

I have also attended workshops in Miami (with Stella Johnson and Magdalena Sole at Street Photo Miami), in Boston (with Stella Johnson through Leica Academy), and in Rockport, Maine (with Peter Turnley, Karen Marshall, Vincent Versace, Jay Maisel, David Julian, Stella Johnson and Magdalena Sole at Maine Media Workshops).

 

In addition to attending travel workshops I have benefitted from participating in online workshops with Anja Hitzenberger, Edward Ratliff, Christine Callahan, Kai McBride, and Stefan Frank through Studelmedialive. I have also participated in online workshops with Vneet Vohra Through Miami Street Photography Festival, with Sarah Stolka and Jill Galloway Sherman at Philadelphia Photo Arts Center, with Arlene Collins through Maine Media and with Quinton Gordon through Leica Akademie.

 

I photograph with the Fuji XT-3, using 16mm,18mm, 23mm, 35mm lenses, and 56mm lenses. I also photograph with Fuji X100v. My post-processing is minimal. I use Lightroom, and D x O plug-ins. My goal is not to change or create the scene but to record it as unobtrusively as possible.

Taking Pause

[embed]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7eiuc3zG9NI[/embed]

Video courtesy of the Princeton University Humanities Council 

 

Taking Pause is a documentary portrait project created by ACP Artist-in-Residence Robin Resch that asks people to reflect on what in their lives feels most essential. The project is on view in Princeton’s Dohm Alley from April-October 2021.

 

With what do we identify and connect most deeply? What truly matters to us, and why?   

 

This series seeks to create telling portraits of people through what is deeply meaningful to them. To make these portraits, photographer Resch ask each participant the same simple thought-provoking question: “what is irreplaceable to you?”

 

Each person is documented with two distinct portraits.  One of their physical self and another of their reflective self, through what they have chosen to share. It is a collaborative project as those who participate are more than passing subjects. In addition to sharing something of deep personal resonance, each participant also tells the story behind what they chose and engages others to take part in the project. 

 

Taking Pause combines photographs and stories in a visual and verbal narrative that explores the complexities and simplicities of what we value. The intent is to document the differences and commonalities of these choices while engaging the spectrum of American diversity and disconnections.

 

Work on this series began in early 2018 with a core group of participants from varying backgrounds. Between November 2018 and March 2019, Resch began to expand the project’s community and network exponentially by working with people across the United States, driving solo 10,553 miles from East to West along a southerly route that naturally evolved and was largely determined by the location of the contributors. Resch’s goal for this Princeton manifestation of her Taking Pause project is to capture as broad a spectrum of the local community as possible. 

 

“Our lives are so diverse and we’ve all been impacted in similar and yet differing ways,” says Resch. “To some degree, it has been equalizing. In other ways it’s been polarizing. How has it impacted us? Have our values changed? Would we answer the question ‘what is irreplaceable to you?’ differently today than a year ago?”  Her hope is to sow seeds for a conversation that may help heal in such a challenging time and that as a collaborative project, Taking Pause may help rebuild trust by addressing our fears and fostering communication and reflection.

 

Resch’s work with each participant culminates in two photos and their brief written text, creating a finished portrait set. Five portrait sets will be printed on vinyl banners and be displayed in Dohm Alley, located near the corner of Nassau and Witherspoon streets, from April to October 2021, as a public art display, free and open to the public.

 

Robin Resch is a Princeton-based photographer who lived in Italy, France, and the Netherlands until 1998. She left Europe to pursue her Master’s in Architecture at Princeton University, which she combined with advanced photographic studies with Emmet Gowin and Andrew Moore. Her architectural training informs her documentary photographic work as she is particularly interested in making images that are about and their personal environments as well as the impact on our collective environments. Her landscape photography, which is more abstract, seeks to explore our human experience of the natural environment.

 

Resch’s work has been exhibited at Princeton University’s Lucas Gallery, the Pringle Gallery in Philadelphia, Design Within Reach, Princeton Project Space, the Arts Council of Princeton, and the Nassau Club. Her photographs have been published in the New York Times, the Witte de With Cahiers, the Rotterdams Dagblad, Italian GQ, and Princeton Magazine. Robin has maintained an active portrait studio since 2003. In 2012, she was honored to be the exclusive campaign photographer for the Princeton fundraising event with First Lady Michelle Obama.

Tuesday, September 21

Constant Repeating Themes

[caption id="attachment_30867" align="aligncenter" width="600"] .[/caption]

 

As a photographer, the themes of urban landscape and man’s impact on the environment have long intrigued me both artistically and intellectually. I witness this in constructions as simple as building façades in a strip mall to the deserted athletic fields in parks and playgrounds. 

 

Through my viewfinder I seek to contrast and compare the interactions of natural and man-made elements. I tend to seek out landscapes that speak to a certain stillness. In the buildings and structures that I photograph, I emphasize their architectural quality in the space that they exist. Geometry, shadow and light play major roles in my image making. I consider my work to be informed by traditional landscape. My interpretation reflects a sense of solitude that I wish to convey on to the viewer.

 

– Aubrey J. Kauffman

Princeton Together

For four or five years, I have been documenting the Princeton community. I have roamed the streets looking for scenes of daily life, and have gone to many special events. Most of the events pictured in this show were presented by the Arts Council! Among the events included in this show are the Halloween Parade, the Bollywood festival, and the Day of the Dead, as well as demonstrations in support of immigrant rights and the need to protect our environment. My hope is that this exhibit shows the wonderful diversity we have in this community and the ways that various groups support each other to both inform and entertain.

 

 

ABOUT THE ARTIST

My photographs are my visual diary. They record what I see at the time and reflect many of the experiences I have had over my lifetime. Most evident is my interest in people, especially children. Those are the interests which led me to be an elementary and secondary level teacher for most of my professional life. My other interests are Art and Architecture. I have worked both in an Art Gallery and in museums.

 

Cities provide me with endless opportunities to photograph people in a variety of environments. New York is a short bus ride from my home. Photographing there has led me to explore Urban life in several other countries. I have benefitted from participating in workshops in Paris, Rome, and Normandy (with Valerie Jardin), in Havana (with Doug Kaye), in Milan (with Steve Simon and Ugo Cei).

 

In addition, I have taken workshops in New York with Steve Simon, Valerie Jardin, Bob Sacha (through National Geographic Expeditions), and at the International Center of Photography with Karen Marshall, Jade Doskow, Richard Rothman, and Anja Hitzenberger.

 

I have also attended workshops in Miami (with Stella Johnson and Magdalena Sole at Street Photo Miami), in Boston (with Stella Johnson through Leica Academy), and in Rockport, Maine (with Peter Turnley, Karen Marshall, Vincent Versace, Jay Maisel, David Julian, Stella Johnson and Magdalena Sole at Maine Media Workshops).

 

In addition to attending travel workshops I have benefitted from participating in online workshops with Anja Hitzenberger, Edward Ratliff, Christine Callahan, Kai McBride, and Stefan Frank through Studelmedialive. I have also participated in online workshops with Vneet Vohra Through Miami Street Photography Festival, with Sarah Stolka and Jill Galloway Sherman at Philadelphia Photo Arts Center, with Arlene Collins through Maine Media and with Quinton Gordon through Leica Akademie.

 

I photograph with the Fuji XT-3, using 16mm,18mm, 23mm, 35mm lenses, and 56mm lenses. I also photograph with Fuji X100v. My post-processing is minimal. I use Lightroom, and D x O plug-ins. My goal is not to change or create the scene but to record it as unobtrusively as possible.

Taking Pause

[embed]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7eiuc3zG9NI[/embed]

Video courtesy of the Princeton University Humanities Council 

 

Taking Pause is a documentary portrait project created by ACP Artist-in-Residence Robin Resch that asks people to reflect on what in their lives feels most essential. The project is on view in Princeton’s Dohm Alley from April-October 2021.

 

With what do we identify and connect most deeply? What truly matters to us, and why?   

 

This series seeks to create telling portraits of people through what is deeply meaningful to them. To make these portraits, photographer Resch ask each participant the same simple thought-provoking question: “what is irreplaceable to you?”

 

Each person is documented with two distinct portraits.  One of their physical self and another of their reflective self, through what they have chosen to share. It is a collaborative project as those who participate are more than passing subjects. In addition to sharing something of deep personal resonance, each participant also tells the story behind what they chose and engages others to take part in the project. 

 

Taking Pause combines photographs and stories in a visual and verbal narrative that explores the complexities and simplicities of what we value. The intent is to document the differences and commonalities of these choices while engaging the spectrum of American diversity and disconnections.

 

Work on this series began in early 2018 with a core group of participants from varying backgrounds. Between November 2018 and March 2019, Resch began to expand the project’s community and network exponentially by working with people across the United States, driving solo 10,553 miles from East to West along a southerly route that naturally evolved and was largely determined by the location of the contributors. Resch’s goal for this Princeton manifestation of her Taking Pause project is to capture as broad a spectrum of the local community as possible. 

 

“Our lives are so diverse and we’ve all been impacted in similar and yet differing ways,” says Resch. “To some degree, it has been equalizing. In other ways it’s been polarizing. How has it impacted us? Have our values changed? Would we answer the question ‘what is irreplaceable to you?’ differently today than a year ago?”  Her hope is to sow seeds for a conversation that may help heal in such a challenging time and that as a collaborative project, Taking Pause may help rebuild trust by addressing our fears and fostering communication and reflection.

 

Resch’s work with each participant culminates in two photos and their brief written text, creating a finished portrait set. Five portrait sets will be printed on vinyl banners and be displayed in Dohm Alley, located near the corner of Nassau and Witherspoon streets, from April to October 2021, as a public art display, free and open to the public.

 

Robin Resch is a Princeton-based photographer who lived in Italy, France, and the Netherlands until 1998. She left Europe to pursue her Master’s in Architecture at Princeton University, which she combined with advanced photographic studies with Emmet Gowin and Andrew Moore. Her architectural training informs her documentary photographic work as she is particularly interested in making images that are about and their personal environments as well as the impact on our collective environments. Her landscape photography, which is more abstract, seeks to explore our human experience of the natural environment.

 

Resch’s work has been exhibited at Princeton University’s Lucas Gallery, the Pringle Gallery in Philadelphia, Design Within Reach, Princeton Project Space, the Arts Council of Princeton, and the Nassau Club. Her photographs have been published in the New York Times, the Witte de With Cahiers, the Rotterdams Dagblad, Italian GQ, and Princeton Magazine. Robin has maintained an active portrait studio since 2003. In 2012, she was honored to be the exclusive campaign photographer for the Princeton fundraising event with First Lady Michelle Obama.

Wednesday, September 22

Princeton Pecha

- Free and open to the public!
[caption id="attachment_29161" align="aligncenter" width="600"] .[/caption]

Princeton Pecha brings local artists together to share their work in a virtual program inspired by PechaKucha, a lively, upbeat format created in Japan designed for more show and less talk. Each artist shows 20 slides for 20 seconds each (about 7 minutes per artist), exhibiting for the audience an array of visual expression. This iteration of Princeton Pecha will highlight talented area artists curated and hosted by Eva Mantell

 

Featured artists:

[caption id="attachment_31285" align="aligncenter" width="300"] .[/caption]

 

Constant Repeating Themes

[caption id="attachment_30867" align="aligncenter" width="600"] .[/caption]

 

As a photographer, the themes of urban landscape and man’s impact on the environment have long intrigued me both artistically and intellectually. I witness this in constructions as simple as building façades in a strip mall to the deserted athletic fields in parks and playgrounds. 

 

Through my viewfinder I seek to contrast and compare the interactions of natural and man-made elements. I tend to seek out landscapes that speak to a certain stillness. In the buildings and structures that I photograph, I emphasize their architectural quality in the space that they exist. Geometry, shadow and light play major roles in my image making. I consider my work to be informed by traditional landscape. My interpretation reflects a sense of solitude that I wish to convey on to the viewer.

 

– Aubrey J. Kauffman

Princeton Together

For four or five years, I have been documenting the Princeton community. I have roamed the streets looking for scenes of daily life, and have gone to many special events. Most of the events pictured in this show were presented by the Arts Council! Among the events included in this show are the Halloween Parade, the Bollywood festival, and the Day of the Dead, as well as demonstrations in support of immigrant rights and the need to protect our environment. My hope is that this exhibit shows the wonderful diversity we have in this community and the ways that various groups support each other to both inform and entertain.

 

 

ABOUT THE ARTIST

My photographs are my visual diary. They record what I see at the time and reflect many of the experiences I have had over my lifetime. Most evident is my interest in people, especially children. Those are the interests which led me to be an elementary and secondary level teacher for most of my professional life. My other interests are Art and Architecture. I have worked both in an Art Gallery and in museums.

 

Cities provide me with endless opportunities to photograph people in a variety of environments. New York is a short bus ride from my home. Photographing there has led me to explore Urban life in several other countries. I have benefitted from participating in workshops in Paris, Rome, and Normandy (with Valerie Jardin), in Havana (with Doug Kaye), in Milan (with Steve Simon and Ugo Cei).

 

In addition, I have taken workshops in New York with Steve Simon, Valerie Jardin, Bob Sacha (through National Geographic Expeditions), and at the International Center of Photography with Karen Marshall, Jade Doskow, Richard Rothman, and Anja Hitzenberger.

 

I have also attended workshops in Miami (with Stella Johnson and Magdalena Sole at Street Photo Miami), in Boston (with Stella Johnson through Leica Academy), and in Rockport, Maine (with Peter Turnley, Karen Marshall, Vincent Versace, Jay Maisel, David Julian, Stella Johnson and Magdalena Sole at Maine Media Workshops).

 

In addition to attending travel workshops I have benefitted from participating in online workshops with Anja Hitzenberger, Edward Ratliff, Christine Callahan, Kai McBride, and Stefan Frank through Studelmedialive. I have also participated in online workshops with Vneet Vohra Through Miami Street Photography Festival, with Sarah Stolka and Jill Galloway Sherman at Philadelphia Photo Arts Center, with Arlene Collins through Maine Media and with Quinton Gordon through Leica Akademie.

 

I photograph with the Fuji XT-3, using 16mm,18mm, 23mm, 35mm lenses, and 56mm lenses. I also photograph with Fuji X100v. My post-processing is minimal. I use Lightroom, and D x O plug-ins. My goal is not to change or create the scene but to record it as unobtrusively as possible.

Taking Pause

[embed]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7eiuc3zG9NI[/embed]

Video courtesy of the Princeton University Humanities Council 

 

Taking Pause is a documentary portrait project created by ACP Artist-in-Residence Robin Resch that asks people to reflect on what in their lives feels most essential. The project is on view in Princeton’s Dohm Alley from April-October 2021.

 

With what do we identify and connect most deeply? What truly matters to us, and why?   

 

This series seeks to create telling portraits of people through what is deeply meaningful to them. To make these portraits, photographer Resch ask each participant the same simple thought-provoking question: “what is irreplaceable to you?”

 

Each person is documented with two distinct portraits.  One of their physical self and another of their reflective self, through what they have chosen to share. It is a collaborative project as those who participate are more than passing subjects. In addition to sharing something of deep personal resonance, each participant also tells the story behind what they chose and engages others to take part in the project. 

 

Taking Pause combines photographs and stories in a visual and verbal narrative that explores the complexities and simplicities of what we value. The intent is to document the differences and commonalities of these choices while engaging the spectrum of American diversity and disconnections.

 

Work on this series began in early 2018 with a core group of participants from varying backgrounds. Between November 2018 and March 2019, Resch began to expand the project’s community and network exponentially by working with people across the United States, driving solo 10,553 miles from East to West along a southerly route that naturally evolved and was largely determined by the location of the contributors. Resch’s goal for this Princeton manifestation of her Taking Pause project is to capture as broad a spectrum of the local community as possible. 

 

“Our lives are so diverse and we’ve all been impacted in similar and yet differing ways,” says Resch. “To some degree, it has been equalizing. In other ways it’s been polarizing. How has it impacted us? Have our values changed? Would we answer the question ‘what is irreplaceable to you?’ differently today than a year ago?”  Her hope is to sow seeds for a conversation that may help heal in such a challenging time and that as a collaborative project, Taking Pause may help rebuild trust by addressing our fears and fostering communication and reflection.

 

Resch’s work with each participant culminates in two photos and their brief written text, creating a finished portrait set. Five portrait sets will be printed on vinyl banners and be displayed in Dohm Alley, located near the corner of Nassau and Witherspoon streets, from April to October 2021, as a public art display, free and open to the public.

 

Robin Resch is a Princeton-based photographer who lived in Italy, France, and the Netherlands until 1998. She left Europe to pursue her Master’s in Architecture at Princeton University, which she combined with advanced photographic studies with Emmet Gowin and Andrew Moore. Her architectural training informs her documentary photographic work as she is particularly interested in making images that are about and their personal environments as well as the impact on our collective environments. Her landscape photography, which is more abstract, seeks to explore our human experience of the natural environment.

 

Resch’s work has been exhibited at Princeton University’s Lucas Gallery, the Pringle Gallery in Philadelphia, Design Within Reach, Princeton Project Space, the Arts Council of Princeton, and the Nassau Club. Her photographs have been published in the New York Times, the Witte de With Cahiers, the Rotterdams Dagblad, Italian GQ, and Princeton Magazine. Robin has maintained an active portrait studio since 2003. In 2012, she was honored to be the exclusive campaign photographer for the Princeton fundraising event with First Lady Michelle Obama.

Thursday, September 23

Artist Talk with Robin Resch

- Free and open to the public!

Taking Pause is a documentary portrait project created by ACP Artist-in-Residence Robin Resch that asks people to reflect on what in their lives feels most essential. The project is on view in Princeton’s Dohm Alley from April-October 2021.

With what do we identify and connect most deeply? What truly matters to us, and why? This series seeks to create telling portraits of people through what is deeply meaningful to them. To make these portraits, Robin asks each participant the same simple thought-provoking question: “what is irreplaceable to you?”

 

Join Robin for an open-air artist talk where she will delve into her Taking Pause project during the pandemic and how she was able to retrieve these thought provoking photos and insights.

 

Dohm Alley is located next to Starbucks on Nassau St in Downtown Princeton. Artist talks are free and open to the public. Seating is limited, register here!

 

Taking Pause was made possible by Timothy M. Andrews, Princeton University Humanities Council, Princeton Future, and The Bank of Princeton.

Constant Repeating Themes

[caption id="attachment_30867" align="aligncenter" width="600"] .[/caption]

 

As a photographer, the themes of urban landscape and man’s impact on the environment have long intrigued me both artistically and intellectually. I witness this in constructions as simple as building façades in a strip mall to the deserted athletic fields in parks and playgrounds. 

 

Through my viewfinder I seek to contrast and compare the interactions of natural and man-made elements. I tend to seek out landscapes that speak to a certain stillness. In the buildings and structures that I photograph, I emphasize their architectural quality in the space that they exist. Geometry, shadow and light play major roles in my image making. I consider my work to be informed by traditional landscape. My interpretation reflects a sense of solitude that I wish to convey on to the viewer.

 

– Aubrey J. Kauffman

Princeton Together

For four or five years, I have been documenting the Princeton community. I have roamed the streets looking for scenes of daily life, and have gone to many special events. Most of the events pictured in this show were presented by the Arts Council! Among the events included in this show are the Halloween Parade, the Bollywood festival, and the Day of the Dead, as well as demonstrations in support of immigrant rights and the need to protect our environment. My hope is that this exhibit shows the wonderful diversity we have in this community and the ways that various groups support each other to both inform and entertain.

 

 

ABOUT THE ARTIST

My photographs are my visual diary. They record what I see at the time and reflect many of the experiences I have had over my lifetime. Most evident is my interest in people, especially children. Those are the interests which led me to be an elementary and secondary level teacher for most of my professional life. My other interests are Art and Architecture. I have worked both in an Art Gallery and in museums.

 

Cities provide me with endless opportunities to photograph people in a variety of environments. New York is a short bus ride from my home. Photographing there has led me to explore Urban life in several other countries. I have benefitted from participating in workshops in Paris, Rome, and Normandy (with Valerie Jardin), in Havana (with Doug Kaye), in Milan (with Steve Simon and Ugo Cei).

 

In addition, I have taken workshops in New York with Steve Simon, Valerie Jardin, Bob Sacha (through National Geographic Expeditions), and at the International Center of Photography with Karen Marshall, Jade Doskow, Richard Rothman, and Anja Hitzenberger.

 

I have also attended workshops in Miami (with Stella Johnson and Magdalena Sole at Street Photo Miami), in Boston (with Stella Johnson through Leica Academy), and in Rockport, Maine (with Peter Turnley, Karen Marshall, Vincent Versace, Jay Maisel, David Julian, Stella Johnson and Magdalena Sole at Maine Media Workshops).

 

In addition to attending travel workshops I have benefitted from participating in online workshops with Anja Hitzenberger, Edward Ratliff, Christine Callahan, Kai McBride, and Stefan Frank through Studelmedialive. I have also participated in online workshops with Vneet Vohra Through Miami Street Photography Festival, with Sarah Stolka and Jill Galloway Sherman at Philadelphia Photo Arts Center, with Arlene Collins through Maine Media and with Quinton Gordon through Leica Akademie.

 

I photograph with the Fuji XT-3, using 16mm,18mm, 23mm, 35mm lenses, and 56mm lenses. I also photograph with Fuji X100v. My post-processing is minimal. I use Lightroom, and D x O plug-ins. My goal is not to change or create the scene but to record it as unobtrusively as possible.

Taking Pause

[embed]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7eiuc3zG9NI[/embed]

Video courtesy of the Princeton University Humanities Council 

 

Taking Pause is a documentary portrait project created by ACP Artist-in-Residence Robin Resch that asks people to reflect on what in their lives feels most essential. The project is on view in Princeton’s Dohm Alley from April-October 2021.

 

With what do we identify and connect most deeply? What truly matters to us, and why?   

 

This series seeks to create telling portraits of people through what is deeply meaningful to them. To make these portraits, photographer Resch ask each participant the same simple thought-provoking question: “what is irreplaceable to you?”

 

Each person is documented with two distinct portraits.  One of their physical self and another of their reflective self, through what they have chosen to share. It is a collaborative project as those who participate are more than passing subjects. In addition to sharing something of deep personal resonance, each participant also tells the story behind what they chose and engages others to take part in the project. 

 

Taking Pause combines photographs and stories in a visual and verbal narrative that explores the complexities and simplicities of what we value. The intent is to document the differences and commonalities of these choices while engaging the spectrum of American diversity and disconnections.

 

Work on this series began in early 2018 with a core group of participants from varying backgrounds. Between November 2018 and March 2019, Resch began to expand the project’s community and network exponentially by working with people across the United States, driving solo 10,553 miles from East to West along a southerly route that naturally evolved and was largely determined by the location of the contributors. Resch’s goal for this Princeton manifestation of her Taking Pause project is to capture as broad a spectrum of the local community as possible. 

 

“Our lives are so diverse and we’ve all been impacted in similar and yet differing ways,” says Resch. “To some degree, it has been equalizing. In other ways it’s been polarizing. How has it impacted us? Have our values changed? Would we answer the question ‘what is irreplaceable to you?’ differently today than a year ago?”  Her hope is to sow seeds for a conversation that may help heal in such a challenging time and that as a collaborative project, Taking Pause may help rebuild trust by addressing our fears and fostering communication and reflection.

 

Resch’s work with each participant culminates in two photos and their brief written text, creating a finished portrait set. Five portrait sets will be printed on vinyl banners and be displayed in Dohm Alley, located near the corner of Nassau and Witherspoon streets, from April to October 2021, as a public art display, free and open to the public.

 

Robin Resch is a Princeton-based photographer who lived in Italy, France, and the Netherlands until 1998. She left Europe to pursue her Master’s in Architecture at Princeton University, which she combined with advanced photographic studies with Emmet Gowin and Andrew Moore. Her architectural training informs her documentary photographic work as she is particularly interested in making images that are about and their personal environments as well as the impact on our collective environments. Her landscape photography, which is more abstract, seeks to explore our human experience of the natural environment.

 

Resch’s work has been exhibited at Princeton University’s Lucas Gallery, the Pringle Gallery in Philadelphia, Design Within Reach, Princeton Project Space, the Arts Council of Princeton, and the Nassau Club. Her photographs have been published in the New York Times, the Witte de With Cahiers, the Rotterdams Dagblad, Italian GQ, and Princeton Magazine. Robin has maintained an active portrait studio since 2003. In 2012, she was honored to be the exclusive campaign photographer for the Princeton fundraising event with First Lady Michelle Obama.