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Tuesday, May 17

COMMUNICATION BETWEEN FORMS

[caption id="attachment_34499" align="aligncenter" width="600"] Colour Jungle | Acrylic on Canvas, 2019[/caption]

My work has been evolving recently to include more layers, more color and more depth. I’ve been continuing the push to step away from the usual process, which was: draw a shape and fill in the shape. Instead, I’ve been creating organic forms, activating the negative spaces, layering and mixing paints all while continuing to think as if the forms were communicating with each other. For a long time I was compelled to create very crisp and clean lines in my work. The “graphic designer” inside me who wants organization of elements was the prominent voice in those pieces and honestly the paintings were how I viewed the world through that 2D graphic lens. Whereas now, I’m opening myself up a bit in my composition and technique. Everything feels chaotic and my paintings are a way of exerting control in a chaotic world. This is represented by the push and pull between the graphic elements and the painterly elements in these latest works. As I have anxiety, I look to have a sense of control. Being creative in my work has allowed me to have that sense as pattern making and repetitiveness calms me down and is meditative to me.

 

My work is all improvised and I develop a piece as I create it. I tend to make the marks and think later. Even with the ceramic forms, I will look at the shape and determine what glaze to use after instead of going in with a determined vision. This way of improvised working creates a dialogue between myself and the work. I listen to my instinct, energy and emotion. There is also a sense of self in that I don’t worry about a mistake. I only react to what I see, knowing that anything can be adjusted and reacted to. To me, it is improvisation and trust that are the basis of how I create. This really allows me to enjoy what I do and fully invest myself into the work. Ultimately the journey to create a piece is a joyful one. I hope that comes across in the final works, which I’m excited to bring to the Arts Council of Princeton. 

 

[caption id="attachment_34507" align="aligncenter" width="500"] I was thinking the same thing | Acrylic on Canvas, 2020[/caption]

 

 

Nature Restores

[caption id="attachment_34883" align="aligncenter" width="600"] .[/caption]

When working in plein air I try to convey the sense of peace that I feel when working outside, surrounded by the light that I attempt to capture. Interacting with nature is an invigorating force and landscape painting is a timeless art form that reflects our past, and our future. The changing seasons of New Jersey echo the rhythms of our lives. The interplay between a tree and the sky or light and shadow represent the essence of our natural world that should be cherished.

Most of my pastel paintings are completed on site with some tweaks in the studio. I use a portable easel and start with an underpainting to establish values. I try to find a private spot that is in the shade and away from traffic so that I can focus on the work. The basics of a piece need to be completed relatively quickly before a cloud alters the lighting or a swarm of gnats moves in.

STEEP: A National Teapot Exhibition

STEEP: A National Teapot Exhibition showcases ceramic work that explores the infinite possibilities of the idea of a teapot, juried by Adam Welch, ceramic artist and ACP Executive Director. 

 

Exhibiting Artists: 

Juliet Bacchas
Sam Briegel
Nolan Baumgartner
Casey Beck 
Marysia Bohrer
Laurie Caffery
Sue S. Chiu
Rod Dugal
Stuart Gair
Rebecca Graham
Tyler Gulden
Eric Hoefer
Samuel Johnson
Jim Kearns
Emma Kohn
Cindy Laliwala
Liz Lurie
Mathew McConnell
Mariah McLaughlin
Yelena Mijares
Peter Pincus
Debbie Reichard
Eric Rempe
Josh Scott
Yoko Sekino-Bove
Sandra Daulton Shaughnessy
Hitomi Shibata
Taylor Sijan
Judy K. Weddle
Molly Wicks
Joshua Zinder 

Wednesday, May 18

COMMUNICATION BETWEEN FORMS

[caption id="attachment_34499" align="aligncenter" width="600"] Colour Jungle | Acrylic on Canvas, 2019[/caption]

My work has been evolving recently to include more layers, more color and more depth. I’ve been continuing the push to step away from the usual process, which was: draw a shape and fill in the shape. Instead, I’ve been creating organic forms, activating the negative spaces, layering and mixing paints all while continuing to think as if the forms were communicating with each other. For a long time I was compelled to create very crisp and clean lines in my work. The “graphic designer” inside me who wants organization of elements was the prominent voice in those pieces and honestly the paintings were how I viewed the world through that 2D graphic lens. Whereas now, I’m opening myself up a bit in my composition and technique. Everything feels chaotic and my paintings are a way of exerting control in a chaotic world. This is represented by the push and pull between the graphic elements and the painterly elements in these latest works. As I have anxiety, I look to have a sense of control. Being creative in my work has allowed me to have that sense as pattern making and repetitiveness calms me down and is meditative to me.

 

My work is all improvised and I develop a piece as I create it. I tend to make the marks and think later. Even with the ceramic forms, I will look at the shape and determine what glaze to use after instead of going in with a determined vision. This way of improvised working creates a dialogue between myself and the work. I listen to my instinct, energy and emotion. There is also a sense of self in that I don’t worry about a mistake. I only react to what I see, knowing that anything can be adjusted and reacted to. To me, it is improvisation and trust that are the basis of how I create. This really allows me to enjoy what I do and fully invest myself into the work. Ultimately the journey to create a piece is a joyful one. I hope that comes across in the final works, which I’m excited to bring to the Arts Council of Princeton. 

 

[caption id="attachment_34507" align="aligncenter" width="500"] I was thinking the same thing | Acrylic on Canvas, 2020[/caption]

 

 

Nature Restores

[caption id="attachment_34883" align="aligncenter" width="600"] .[/caption]

When working in plein air I try to convey the sense of peace that I feel when working outside, surrounded by the light that I attempt to capture. Interacting with nature is an invigorating force and landscape painting is a timeless art form that reflects our past, and our future. The changing seasons of New Jersey echo the rhythms of our lives. The interplay between a tree and the sky or light and shadow represent the essence of our natural world that should be cherished.

Most of my pastel paintings are completed on site with some tweaks in the studio. I use a portable easel and start with an underpainting to establish values. I try to find a private spot that is in the shade and away from traffic so that I can focus on the work. The basics of a piece need to be completed relatively quickly before a cloud alters the lighting or a swarm of gnats moves in.

STEEP: A National Teapot Exhibition

STEEP: A National Teapot Exhibition showcases ceramic work that explores the infinite possibilities of the idea of a teapot, juried by Adam Welch, ceramic artist and ACP Executive Director. 

 

Exhibiting Artists: 

Juliet Bacchas
Sam Briegel
Nolan Baumgartner
Casey Beck 
Marysia Bohrer
Laurie Caffery
Sue S. Chiu
Rod Dugal
Stuart Gair
Rebecca Graham
Tyler Gulden
Eric Hoefer
Samuel Johnson
Jim Kearns
Emma Kohn
Cindy Laliwala
Liz Lurie
Mathew McConnell
Mariah McLaughlin
Yelena Mijares
Peter Pincus
Debbie Reichard
Eric Rempe
Josh Scott
Yoko Sekino-Bove
Sandra Daulton Shaughnessy
Hitomi Shibata
Taylor Sijan
Judy K. Weddle
Molly Wicks
Joshua Zinder 

Thursday, May 19

COMMUNICATION BETWEEN FORMS

[caption id="attachment_34499" align="aligncenter" width="600"] Colour Jungle | Acrylic on Canvas, 2019[/caption]

My work has been evolving recently to include more layers, more color and more depth. I’ve been continuing the push to step away from the usual process, which was: draw a shape and fill in the shape. Instead, I’ve been creating organic forms, activating the negative spaces, layering and mixing paints all while continuing to think as if the forms were communicating with each other. For a long time I was compelled to create very crisp and clean lines in my work. The “graphic designer” inside me who wants organization of elements was the prominent voice in those pieces and honestly the paintings were how I viewed the world through that 2D graphic lens. Whereas now, I’m opening myself up a bit in my composition and technique. Everything feels chaotic and my paintings are a way of exerting control in a chaotic world. This is represented by the push and pull between the graphic elements and the painterly elements in these latest works. As I have anxiety, I look to have a sense of control. Being creative in my work has allowed me to have that sense as pattern making and repetitiveness calms me down and is meditative to me.

 

My work is all improvised and I develop a piece as I create it. I tend to make the marks and think later. Even with the ceramic forms, I will look at the shape and determine what glaze to use after instead of going in with a determined vision. This way of improvised working creates a dialogue between myself and the work. I listen to my instinct, energy and emotion. There is also a sense of self in that I don’t worry about a mistake. I only react to what I see, knowing that anything can be adjusted and reacted to. To me, it is improvisation and trust that are the basis of how I create. This really allows me to enjoy what I do and fully invest myself into the work. Ultimately the journey to create a piece is a joyful one. I hope that comes across in the final works, which I’m excited to bring to the Arts Council of Princeton. 

 

[caption id="attachment_34507" align="aligncenter" width="500"] I was thinking the same thing | Acrylic on Canvas, 2020[/caption]

 

 

Nature Restores

[caption id="attachment_34883" align="aligncenter" width="600"] .[/caption]

When working in plein air I try to convey the sense of peace that I feel when working outside, surrounded by the light that I attempt to capture. Interacting with nature is an invigorating force and landscape painting is a timeless art form that reflects our past, and our future. The changing seasons of New Jersey echo the rhythms of our lives. The interplay between a tree and the sky or light and shadow represent the essence of our natural world that should be cherished.

Most of my pastel paintings are completed on site with some tweaks in the studio. I use a portable easel and start with an underpainting to establish values. I try to find a private spot that is in the shade and away from traffic so that I can focus on the work. The basics of a piece need to be completed relatively quickly before a cloud alters the lighting or a swarm of gnats moves in.

STEEP: A National Teapot Exhibition

STEEP: A National Teapot Exhibition showcases ceramic work that explores the infinite possibilities of the idea of a teapot, juried by Adam Welch, ceramic artist and ACP Executive Director. 

 

Exhibiting Artists: 

Juliet Bacchas
Sam Briegel
Nolan Baumgartner
Casey Beck 
Marysia Bohrer
Laurie Caffery
Sue S. Chiu
Rod Dugal
Stuart Gair
Rebecca Graham
Tyler Gulden
Eric Hoefer
Samuel Johnson
Jim Kearns
Emma Kohn
Cindy Laliwala
Liz Lurie
Mathew McConnell
Mariah McLaughlin
Yelena Mijares
Peter Pincus
Debbie Reichard
Eric Rempe
Josh Scott
Yoko Sekino-Bove
Sandra Daulton Shaughnessy
Hitomi Shibata
Taylor Sijan
Judy K. Weddle
Molly Wicks
Joshua Zinder 

Friday, May 20

COMMUNICATION BETWEEN FORMS

[caption id="attachment_34499" align="aligncenter" width="600"] Colour Jungle | Acrylic on Canvas, 2019[/caption]

My work has been evolving recently to include more layers, more color and more depth. I’ve been continuing the push to step away from the usual process, which was: draw a shape and fill in the shape. Instead, I’ve been creating organic forms, activating the negative spaces, layering and mixing paints all while continuing to think as if the forms were communicating with each other. For a long time I was compelled to create very crisp and clean lines in my work. The “graphic designer” inside me who wants organization of elements was the prominent voice in those pieces and honestly the paintings were how I viewed the world through that 2D graphic lens. Whereas now, I’m opening myself up a bit in my composition and technique. Everything feels chaotic and my paintings are a way of exerting control in a chaotic world. This is represented by the push and pull between the graphic elements and the painterly elements in these latest works. As I have anxiety, I look to have a sense of control. Being creative in my work has allowed me to have that sense as pattern making and repetitiveness calms me down and is meditative to me.

 

My work is all improvised and I develop a piece as I create it. I tend to make the marks and think later. Even with the ceramic forms, I will look at the shape and determine what glaze to use after instead of going in with a determined vision. This way of improvised working creates a dialogue between myself and the work. I listen to my instinct, energy and emotion. There is also a sense of self in that I don’t worry about a mistake. I only react to what I see, knowing that anything can be adjusted and reacted to. To me, it is improvisation and trust that are the basis of how I create. This really allows me to enjoy what I do and fully invest myself into the work. Ultimately the journey to create a piece is a joyful one. I hope that comes across in the final works, which I’m excited to bring to the Arts Council of Princeton. 

 

[caption id="attachment_34507" align="aligncenter" width="500"] I was thinking the same thing | Acrylic on Canvas, 2020[/caption]

 

 

Nature Restores

[caption id="attachment_34883" align="aligncenter" width="600"] .[/caption]

When working in plein air I try to convey the sense of peace that I feel when working outside, surrounded by the light that I attempt to capture. Interacting with nature is an invigorating force and landscape painting is a timeless art form that reflects our past, and our future. The changing seasons of New Jersey echo the rhythms of our lives. The interplay between a tree and the sky or light and shadow represent the essence of our natural world that should be cherished.

Most of my pastel paintings are completed on site with some tweaks in the studio. I use a portable easel and start with an underpainting to establish values. I try to find a private spot that is in the shade and away from traffic so that I can focus on the work. The basics of a piece need to be completed relatively quickly before a cloud alters the lighting or a swarm of gnats moves in.

STEEP: A National Teapot Exhibition

STEEP: A National Teapot Exhibition showcases ceramic work that explores the infinite possibilities of the idea of a teapot, juried by Adam Welch, ceramic artist and ACP Executive Director. 

 

Exhibiting Artists: 

Juliet Bacchas
Sam Briegel
Nolan Baumgartner
Casey Beck 
Marysia Bohrer
Laurie Caffery
Sue S. Chiu
Rod Dugal
Stuart Gair
Rebecca Graham
Tyler Gulden
Eric Hoefer
Samuel Johnson
Jim Kearns
Emma Kohn
Cindy Laliwala
Liz Lurie
Mathew McConnell
Mariah McLaughlin
Yelena Mijares
Peter Pincus
Debbie Reichard
Eric Rempe
Josh Scott
Yoko Sekino-Bove
Sandra Daulton Shaughnessy
Hitomi Shibata
Taylor Sijan
Judy K. Weddle
Molly Wicks
Joshua Zinder 

Saturday, May 21

COMMUNICATION BETWEEN FORMS

[caption id="attachment_34499" align="aligncenter" width="600"] Colour Jungle | Acrylic on Canvas, 2019[/caption]

My work has been evolving recently to include more layers, more color and more depth. I’ve been continuing the push to step away from the usual process, which was: draw a shape and fill in the shape. Instead, I’ve been creating organic forms, activating the negative spaces, layering and mixing paints all while continuing to think as if the forms were communicating with each other. For a long time I was compelled to create very crisp and clean lines in my work. The “graphic designer” inside me who wants organization of elements was the prominent voice in those pieces and honestly the paintings were how I viewed the world through that 2D graphic lens. Whereas now, I’m opening myself up a bit in my composition and technique. Everything feels chaotic and my paintings are a way of exerting control in a chaotic world. This is represented by the push and pull between the graphic elements and the painterly elements in these latest works. As I have anxiety, I look to have a sense of control. Being creative in my work has allowed me to have that sense as pattern making and repetitiveness calms me down and is meditative to me.

 

My work is all improvised and I develop a piece as I create it. I tend to make the marks and think later. Even with the ceramic forms, I will look at the shape and determine what glaze to use after instead of going in with a determined vision. This way of improvised working creates a dialogue between myself and the work. I listen to my instinct, energy and emotion. There is also a sense of self in that I don’t worry about a mistake. I only react to what I see, knowing that anything can be adjusted and reacted to. To me, it is improvisation and trust that are the basis of how I create. This really allows me to enjoy what I do and fully invest myself into the work. Ultimately the journey to create a piece is a joyful one. I hope that comes across in the final works, which I’m excited to bring to the Arts Council of Princeton. 

 

[caption id="attachment_34507" align="aligncenter" width="500"] I was thinking the same thing | Acrylic on Canvas, 2020[/caption]

 

 

Nature Restores

[caption id="attachment_34883" align="aligncenter" width="600"] .[/caption]

When working in plein air I try to convey the sense of peace that I feel when working outside, surrounded by the light that I attempt to capture. Interacting with nature is an invigorating force and landscape painting is a timeless art form that reflects our past, and our future. The changing seasons of New Jersey echo the rhythms of our lives. The interplay between a tree and the sky or light and shadow represent the essence of our natural world that should be cherished.

Most of my pastel paintings are completed on site with some tweaks in the studio. I use a portable easel and start with an underpainting to establish values. I try to find a private spot that is in the shade and away from traffic so that I can focus on the work. The basics of a piece need to be completed relatively quickly before a cloud alters the lighting or a swarm of gnats moves in.

STEEP: A National Teapot Exhibition

STEEP: A National Teapot Exhibition showcases ceramic work that explores the infinite possibilities of the idea of a teapot, juried by Adam Welch, ceramic artist and ACP Executive Director. 

 

Exhibiting Artists: 

Juliet Bacchas
Sam Briegel
Nolan Baumgartner
Casey Beck 
Marysia Bohrer
Laurie Caffery
Sue S. Chiu
Rod Dugal
Stuart Gair
Rebecca Graham
Tyler Gulden
Eric Hoefer
Samuel Johnson
Jim Kearns
Emma Kohn
Cindy Laliwala
Liz Lurie
Mathew McConnell
Mariah McLaughlin
Yelena Mijares
Peter Pincus
Debbie Reichard
Eric Rempe
Josh Scott
Yoko Sekino-Bove
Sandra Daulton Shaughnessy
Hitomi Shibata
Taylor Sijan
Judy K. Weddle
Molly Wicks
Joshua Zinder 

Sunday, May 22

COMMUNICATION BETWEEN FORMS

[caption id="attachment_34499" align="aligncenter" width="600"] Colour Jungle | Acrylic on Canvas, 2019[/caption]

My work has been evolving recently to include more layers, more color and more depth. I’ve been continuing the push to step away from the usual process, which was: draw a shape and fill in the shape. Instead, I’ve been creating organic forms, activating the negative spaces, layering and mixing paints all while continuing to think as if the forms were communicating with each other. For a long time I was compelled to create very crisp and clean lines in my work. The “graphic designer” inside me who wants organization of elements was the prominent voice in those pieces and honestly the paintings were how I viewed the world through that 2D graphic lens. Whereas now, I’m opening myself up a bit in my composition and technique. Everything feels chaotic and my paintings are a way of exerting control in a chaotic world. This is represented by the push and pull between the graphic elements and the painterly elements in these latest works. As I have anxiety, I look to have a sense of control. Being creative in my work has allowed me to have that sense as pattern making and repetitiveness calms me down and is meditative to me.

 

My work is all improvised and I develop a piece as I create it. I tend to make the marks and think later. Even with the ceramic forms, I will look at the shape and determine what glaze to use after instead of going in with a determined vision. This way of improvised working creates a dialogue between myself and the work. I listen to my instinct, energy and emotion. There is also a sense of self in that I don’t worry about a mistake. I only react to what I see, knowing that anything can be adjusted and reacted to. To me, it is improvisation and trust that are the basis of how I create. This really allows me to enjoy what I do and fully invest myself into the work. Ultimately the journey to create a piece is a joyful one. I hope that comes across in the final works, which I’m excited to bring to the Arts Council of Princeton. 

 

[caption id="attachment_34507" align="aligncenter" width="500"] I was thinking the same thing | Acrylic on Canvas, 2020[/caption]

 

 

Nature Restores

[caption id="attachment_34883" align="aligncenter" width="600"] .[/caption]

When working in plein air I try to convey the sense of peace that I feel when working outside, surrounded by the light that I attempt to capture. Interacting with nature is an invigorating force and landscape painting is a timeless art form that reflects our past, and our future. The changing seasons of New Jersey echo the rhythms of our lives. The interplay between a tree and the sky or light and shadow represent the essence of our natural world that should be cherished.

Most of my pastel paintings are completed on site with some tweaks in the studio. I use a portable easel and start with an underpainting to establish values. I try to find a private spot that is in the shade and away from traffic so that I can focus on the work. The basics of a piece need to be completed relatively quickly before a cloud alters the lighting or a swarm of gnats moves in.

STEEP: A National Teapot Exhibition

STEEP: A National Teapot Exhibition showcases ceramic work that explores the infinite possibilities of the idea of a teapot, juried by Adam Welch, ceramic artist and ACP Executive Director. 

 

Exhibiting Artists: 

Juliet Bacchas
Sam Briegel
Nolan Baumgartner
Casey Beck 
Marysia Bohrer
Laurie Caffery
Sue S. Chiu
Rod Dugal
Stuart Gair
Rebecca Graham
Tyler Gulden
Eric Hoefer
Samuel Johnson
Jim Kearns
Emma Kohn
Cindy Laliwala
Liz Lurie
Mathew McConnell
Mariah McLaughlin
Yelena Mijares
Peter Pincus
Debbie Reichard
Eric Rempe
Josh Scott
Yoko Sekino-Bove
Sandra Daulton Shaughnessy
Hitomi Shibata
Taylor Sijan
Judy K. Weddle
Molly Wicks
Joshua Zinder 

Monday, May 23

COMMUNICATION BETWEEN FORMS

[caption id="attachment_34499" align="aligncenter" width="600"] Colour Jungle | Acrylic on Canvas, 2019[/caption]

My work has been evolving recently to include more layers, more color and more depth. I’ve been continuing the push to step away from the usual process, which was: draw a shape and fill in the shape. Instead, I’ve been creating organic forms, activating the negative spaces, layering and mixing paints all while continuing to think as if the forms were communicating with each other. For a long time I was compelled to create very crisp and clean lines in my work. The “graphic designer” inside me who wants organization of elements was the prominent voice in those pieces and honestly the paintings were how I viewed the world through that 2D graphic lens. Whereas now, I’m opening myself up a bit in my composition and technique. Everything feels chaotic and my paintings are a way of exerting control in a chaotic world. This is represented by the push and pull between the graphic elements and the painterly elements in these latest works. As I have anxiety, I look to have a sense of control. Being creative in my work has allowed me to have that sense as pattern making and repetitiveness calms me down and is meditative to me.

 

My work is all improvised and I develop a piece as I create it. I tend to make the marks and think later. Even with the ceramic forms, I will look at the shape and determine what glaze to use after instead of going in with a determined vision. This way of improvised working creates a dialogue between myself and the work. I listen to my instinct, energy and emotion. There is also a sense of self in that I don’t worry about a mistake. I only react to what I see, knowing that anything can be adjusted and reacted to. To me, it is improvisation and trust that are the basis of how I create. This really allows me to enjoy what I do and fully invest myself into the work. Ultimately the journey to create a piece is a joyful one. I hope that comes across in the final works, which I’m excited to bring to the Arts Council of Princeton. 

 

[caption id="attachment_34507" align="aligncenter" width="500"] I was thinking the same thing | Acrylic on Canvas, 2020[/caption]

 

 

Nature Restores

[caption id="attachment_34883" align="aligncenter" width="600"] .[/caption]

When working in plein air I try to convey the sense of peace that I feel when working outside, surrounded by the light that I attempt to capture. Interacting with nature is an invigorating force and landscape painting is a timeless art form that reflects our past, and our future. The changing seasons of New Jersey echo the rhythms of our lives. The interplay between a tree and the sky or light and shadow represent the essence of our natural world that should be cherished.

Most of my pastel paintings are completed on site with some tweaks in the studio. I use a portable easel and start with an underpainting to establish values. I try to find a private spot that is in the shade and away from traffic so that I can focus on the work. The basics of a piece need to be completed relatively quickly before a cloud alters the lighting or a swarm of gnats moves in.

STEEP: A National Teapot Exhibition

STEEP: A National Teapot Exhibition showcases ceramic work that explores the infinite possibilities of the idea of a teapot, juried by Adam Welch, ceramic artist and ACP Executive Director. 

 

Exhibiting Artists: 

Juliet Bacchas
Sam Briegel
Nolan Baumgartner
Casey Beck 
Marysia Bohrer
Laurie Caffery
Sue S. Chiu
Rod Dugal
Stuart Gair
Rebecca Graham
Tyler Gulden
Eric Hoefer
Samuel Johnson
Jim Kearns
Emma Kohn
Cindy Laliwala
Liz Lurie
Mathew McConnell
Mariah McLaughlin
Yelena Mijares
Peter Pincus
Debbie Reichard
Eric Rempe
Josh Scott
Yoko Sekino-Bove
Sandra Daulton Shaughnessy
Hitomi Shibata
Taylor Sijan
Judy K. Weddle
Molly Wicks
Joshua Zinder