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Friday, May 18

Nassau Film Festival

- Free and Open to the Public!

Join the Arts Council of Princeton for the first two days of the Nassau Film Festival, held at the ACP’s Paul Robeson Center for the Arts.

This film festival gives an opportunity for new and current filmmakers to have their short films screened. Films are to be from :30 seconds to 20 minutes in length. All genres and styles of films will be considered. A Best of Festival Award will be given in the filmmaker and student filmmaker categories. To learn more, click here.

Arts Council of Princeton
102 Witherspoon Street, Princeton
Thursday, May 17
Friday, May 18
Get directions

Princeton Garden Theatre
160 Nassau Street, Princeton
Saturday, May 19
Sunday, May 20
Get directions

Pinot to Picasso 2018

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Pinot to Picasso 2018

Friday, May 18, 2018
6 to 10pm
Technology Center of Princeton
330 Carter Road, Princeton, NJ

 

PERUSE the Tombola Gallery with works of art donated by select artists, PARTICIPATE in art-making throughout the event and the Tombola, an Italian-style lottery where every Tombola ticket holder wins an original work of art, and DANCE all night!

Click here for more details!

 

I am Innocent: The Migration Back to Freedom for the Innocent in Prison

For the thousands of wrongfully-convicted men and women in this country, their journey starts with a tremendous shock. They are arrested for a serious crime they had nothing to do with. They ultimately wind up in court and despite all evidence to the contrary, they believe it is only a matter of time before police, prosecutors and the judge will realize their mistake. But that never happens. They are locked away with little chance of ever seeing freedom again while living in the hell of maximum security prisons, surrounded by murderers, rapists, and disinterested prison guards. But they must find a way to adapt as this is where they will live for years and years before someone will hear their cries for justice.

Meanwhile, life on the outside goes on without them. They miss countless graduations, birthdays, deaths, and other pivotal moments. Years later for the few who are able to migrate back home after navigating a hostile criminal justice system, they will find that freedom is very different, almost foreign.

This is another difficult journey: they’re back home and in society, but nothing is the same. And again, they must find a way to adapt and live.

The photos and stories in this exhibit will convey the physical and emotional upheaval associated with losing and re-gaining lost freedom and family. For all of the Centurion exonorees, they also find family in the brothers and sisters who have taken the same journey to freedom.

Sixty-one innocent men and women have been freed by Centurion, the first innocence organization, founded in Princeton in 1980.

As this exhibit illustrates: this could happen to anyone.

Interwoven Stories International

 

Diana Weymar developed Interwoven Stories  as 2016 Artist-in-Residence at the Arts Council of Princeton and returns to curate over 250 pages from Princeton, The Peddie School, the Nantucket Stitching Gam, the Zen Hospice Project (San Francisco), Open Space Art (Damascus, Syria), Build Peace (Colombia), the University of Puget Sound (Tacoma), Yarns/NoDominion Theatre (Jersey City), and Trans Tipping Point Project (Victoria, BC).

“This show will be a homecoming for the pages that were created in Princeton and a welcoming for pages from other places”, says Weymar. “As an international project that originated in Princeton, it’s extremely exciting to see how the pages first created in this community have inspired people around the world to create to join the collective narrative.”

 

Local Women in their Crowns: A Portraits and Stories Community Project

 

In conjunction with McCarter Theatre Center‘s production of Crowns, directed by Regina Taylor, the Arts Council of Princeton and McCarter have partnered to create Local Women in their Crowns: A Portraits and Stories Community Project.

Inspired by the book of the same name from which Crowns was created, this visual storytelling project captures portraits and the shared stories of Black women of all ages and backgrounds in their church hats. The culminating exhibition serves as a celebration of African American culture and tradition on display at the Arts Council of Princeton, the Princeton Public Library, and the lobbies of McCarter Theatre.
Photography by Bentrice Jusu and S. Bola Okoya.

[caption id="attachment_20736" align="aligncenter" width="300"] This exhibition is being held in collaborations with Migrations, a community-wide investigation of the theme of migration taking place throughout Princeton from February through May, 2018.[/caption]

Saturday, May 19

I am Innocent: The Migration Back to Freedom for the Innocent in Prison

For the thousands of wrongfully-convicted men and women in this country, their journey starts with a tremendous shock. They are arrested for a serious crime they had nothing to do with. They ultimately wind up in court and despite all evidence to the contrary, they believe it is only a matter of time before police, prosecutors and the judge will realize their mistake. But that never happens. They are locked away with little chance of ever seeing freedom again while living in the hell of maximum security prisons, surrounded by murderers, rapists, and disinterested prison guards. But they must find a way to adapt as this is where they will live for years and years before someone will hear their cries for justice.

Meanwhile, life on the outside goes on without them. They miss countless graduations, birthdays, deaths, and other pivotal moments. Years later for the few who are able to migrate back home after navigating a hostile criminal justice system, they will find that freedom is very different, almost foreign.

This is another difficult journey: they’re back home and in society, but nothing is the same. And again, they must find a way to adapt and live.

The photos and stories in this exhibit will convey the physical and emotional upheaval associated with losing and re-gaining lost freedom and family. For all of the Centurion exonorees, they also find family in the brothers and sisters who have taken the same journey to freedom.

Sixty-one innocent men and women have been freed by Centurion, the first innocence organization, founded in Princeton in 1980.

As this exhibit illustrates: this could happen to anyone.

Interwoven Stories International

 

Diana Weymar developed Interwoven Stories  as 2016 Artist-in-Residence at the Arts Council of Princeton and returns to curate over 250 pages from Princeton, The Peddie School, the Nantucket Stitching Gam, the Zen Hospice Project (San Francisco), Open Space Art (Damascus, Syria), Build Peace (Colombia), the University of Puget Sound (Tacoma), Yarns/NoDominion Theatre (Jersey City), and Trans Tipping Point Project (Victoria, BC).

“This show will be a homecoming for the pages that were created in Princeton and a welcoming for pages from other places”, says Weymar. “As an international project that originated in Princeton, it’s extremely exciting to see how the pages first created in this community have inspired people around the world to create to join the collective narrative.”

 

Local Women in their Crowns: A Portraits and Stories Community Project

 

In conjunction with McCarter Theatre Center‘s production of Crowns, directed by Regina Taylor, the Arts Council of Princeton and McCarter have partnered to create Local Women in their Crowns: A Portraits and Stories Community Project.

Inspired by the book of the same name from which Crowns was created, this visual storytelling project captures portraits and the shared stories of Black women of all ages and backgrounds in their church hats. The culminating exhibition serves as a celebration of African American culture and tradition on display at the Arts Council of Princeton, the Princeton Public Library, and the lobbies of McCarter Theatre.
Photography by Bentrice Jusu and S. Bola Okoya.

[caption id="attachment_20736" align="aligncenter" width="300"] This exhibition is being held in collaborations with Migrations, a community-wide investigation of the theme of migration taking place throughout Princeton from February through May, 2018.[/caption]

Sunday, May 20

I am Innocent: The Migration Back to Freedom for the Innocent in Prison

For the thousands of wrongfully-convicted men and women in this country, their journey starts with a tremendous shock. They are arrested for a serious crime they had nothing to do with. They ultimately wind up in court and despite all evidence to the contrary, they believe it is only a matter of time before police, prosecutors and the judge will realize their mistake. But that never happens. They are locked away with little chance of ever seeing freedom again while living in the hell of maximum security prisons, surrounded by murderers, rapists, and disinterested prison guards. But they must find a way to adapt as this is where they will live for years and years before someone will hear their cries for justice.

Meanwhile, life on the outside goes on without them. They miss countless graduations, birthdays, deaths, and other pivotal moments. Years later for the few who are able to migrate back home after navigating a hostile criminal justice system, they will find that freedom is very different, almost foreign.

This is another difficult journey: they’re back home and in society, but nothing is the same. And again, they must find a way to adapt and live.

The photos and stories in this exhibit will convey the physical and emotional upheaval associated with losing and re-gaining lost freedom and family. For all of the Centurion exonorees, they also find family in the brothers and sisters who have taken the same journey to freedom.

Sixty-one innocent men and women have been freed by Centurion, the first innocence organization, founded in Princeton in 1980.

As this exhibit illustrates: this could happen to anyone.

Interwoven Stories International

 

Diana Weymar developed Interwoven Stories  as 2016 Artist-in-Residence at the Arts Council of Princeton and returns to curate over 250 pages from Princeton, The Peddie School, the Nantucket Stitching Gam, the Zen Hospice Project (San Francisco), Open Space Art (Damascus, Syria), Build Peace (Colombia), the University of Puget Sound (Tacoma), Yarns/NoDominion Theatre (Jersey City), and Trans Tipping Point Project (Victoria, BC).

“This show will be a homecoming for the pages that were created in Princeton and a welcoming for pages from other places”, says Weymar. “As an international project that originated in Princeton, it’s extremely exciting to see how the pages first created in this community have inspired people around the world to create to join the collective narrative.”

 

Local Women in their Crowns: A Portraits and Stories Community Project

 

In conjunction with McCarter Theatre Center‘s production of Crowns, directed by Regina Taylor, the Arts Council of Princeton and McCarter have partnered to create Local Women in their Crowns: A Portraits and Stories Community Project.

Inspired by the book of the same name from which Crowns was created, this visual storytelling project captures portraits and the shared stories of Black women of all ages and backgrounds in their church hats. The culminating exhibition serves as a celebration of African American culture and tradition on display at the Arts Council of Princeton, the Princeton Public Library, and the lobbies of McCarter Theatre.
Photography by Bentrice Jusu and S. Bola Okoya.

[caption id="attachment_20736" align="aligncenter" width="300"] This exhibition is being held in collaborations with Migrations, a community-wide investigation of the theme of migration taking place throughout Princeton from February through May, 2018.[/caption]

Monday, May 21

I am Innocent: The Migration Back to Freedom for the Innocent in Prison

For the thousands of wrongfully-convicted men and women in this country, their journey starts with a tremendous shock. They are arrested for a serious crime they had nothing to do with. They ultimately wind up in court and despite all evidence to the contrary, they believe it is only a matter of time before police, prosecutors and the judge will realize their mistake. But that never happens. They are locked away with little chance of ever seeing freedom again while living in the hell of maximum security prisons, surrounded by murderers, rapists, and disinterested prison guards. But they must find a way to adapt as this is where they will live for years and years before someone will hear their cries for justice.

Meanwhile, life on the outside goes on without them. They miss countless graduations, birthdays, deaths, and other pivotal moments. Years later for the few who are able to migrate back home after navigating a hostile criminal justice system, they will find that freedom is very different, almost foreign.

This is another difficult journey: they’re back home and in society, but nothing is the same. And again, they must find a way to adapt and live.

The photos and stories in this exhibit will convey the physical and emotional upheaval associated with losing and re-gaining lost freedom and family. For all of the Centurion exonorees, they also find family in the brothers and sisters who have taken the same journey to freedom.

Sixty-one innocent men and women have been freed by Centurion, the first innocence organization, founded in Princeton in 1980.

As this exhibit illustrates: this could happen to anyone.

Interwoven Stories International

 

Diana Weymar developed Interwoven Stories  as 2016 Artist-in-Residence at the Arts Council of Princeton and returns to curate over 250 pages from Princeton, The Peddie School, the Nantucket Stitching Gam, the Zen Hospice Project (San Francisco), Open Space Art (Damascus, Syria), Build Peace (Colombia), the University of Puget Sound (Tacoma), Yarns/NoDominion Theatre (Jersey City), and Trans Tipping Point Project (Victoria, BC).

“This show will be a homecoming for the pages that were created in Princeton and a welcoming for pages from other places”, says Weymar. “As an international project that originated in Princeton, it’s extremely exciting to see how the pages first created in this community have inspired people around the world to create to join the collective narrative.”

 

Local Women in their Crowns: A Portraits and Stories Community Project

 

In conjunction with McCarter Theatre Center‘s production of Crowns, directed by Regina Taylor, the Arts Council of Princeton and McCarter have partnered to create Local Women in their Crowns: A Portraits and Stories Community Project.

Inspired by the book of the same name from which Crowns was created, this visual storytelling project captures portraits and the shared stories of Black women of all ages and backgrounds in their church hats. The culminating exhibition serves as a celebration of African American culture and tradition on display at the Arts Council of Princeton, the Princeton Public Library, and the lobbies of McCarter Theatre.
Photography by Bentrice Jusu and S. Bola Okoya.

[caption id="attachment_20736" align="aligncenter" width="300"] This exhibition is being held in collaborations with Migrations, a community-wide investigation of the theme of migration taking place throughout Princeton from February through May, 2018.[/caption]

Tuesday, May 22

I am Innocent: The Migration Back to Freedom for the Innocent in Prison

For the thousands of wrongfully-convicted men and women in this country, their journey starts with a tremendous shock. They are arrested for a serious crime they had nothing to do with. They ultimately wind up in court and despite all evidence to the contrary, they believe it is only a matter of time before police, prosecutors and the judge will realize their mistake. But that never happens. They are locked away with little chance of ever seeing freedom again while living in the hell of maximum security prisons, surrounded by murderers, rapists, and disinterested prison guards. But they must find a way to adapt as this is where they will live for years and years before someone will hear their cries for justice.

Meanwhile, life on the outside goes on without them. They miss countless graduations, birthdays, deaths, and other pivotal moments. Years later for the few who are able to migrate back home after navigating a hostile criminal justice system, they will find that freedom is very different, almost foreign.

This is another difficult journey: they’re back home and in society, but nothing is the same. And again, they must find a way to adapt and live.

The photos and stories in this exhibit will convey the physical and emotional upheaval associated with losing and re-gaining lost freedom and family. For all of the Centurion exonorees, they also find family in the brothers and sisters who have taken the same journey to freedom.

Sixty-one innocent men and women have been freed by Centurion, the first innocence organization, founded in Princeton in 1980.

As this exhibit illustrates: this could happen to anyone.

Interwoven Stories International

 

Diana Weymar developed Interwoven Stories  as 2016 Artist-in-Residence at the Arts Council of Princeton and returns to curate over 250 pages from Princeton, The Peddie School, the Nantucket Stitching Gam, the Zen Hospice Project (San Francisco), Open Space Art (Damascus, Syria), Build Peace (Colombia), the University of Puget Sound (Tacoma), Yarns/NoDominion Theatre (Jersey City), and Trans Tipping Point Project (Victoria, BC).

“This show will be a homecoming for the pages that were created in Princeton and a welcoming for pages from other places”, says Weymar. “As an international project that originated in Princeton, it’s extremely exciting to see how the pages first created in this community have inspired people around the world to create to join the collective narrative.”

 

Local Women in their Crowns: A Portraits and Stories Community Project

 

In conjunction with McCarter Theatre Center‘s production of Crowns, directed by Regina Taylor, the Arts Council of Princeton and McCarter have partnered to create Local Women in their Crowns: A Portraits and Stories Community Project.

Inspired by the book of the same name from which Crowns was created, this visual storytelling project captures portraits and the shared stories of Black women of all ages and backgrounds in their church hats. The culminating exhibition serves as a celebration of African American culture and tradition on display at the Arts Council of Princeton, the Princeton Public Library, and the lobbies of McCarter Theatre.
Photography by Bentrice Jusu and S. Bola Okoya.

[caption id="attachment_20736" align="aligncenter" width="300"] This exhibition is being held in collaborations with Migrations, a community-wide investigation of the theme of migration taking place throughout Princeton from February through May, 2018.[/caption]

Wednesday, May 23

I am Innocent: The Migration Back to Freedom for the Innocent in Prison

For the thousands of wrongfully-convicted men and women in this country, their journey starts with a tremendous shock. They are arrested for a serious crime they had nothing to do with. They ultimately wind up in court and despite all evidence to the contrary, they believe it is only a matter of time before police, prosecutors and the judge will realize their mistake. But that never happens. They are locked away with little chance of ever seeing freedom again while living in the hell of maximum security prisons, surrounded by murderers, rapists, and disinterested prison guards. But they must find a way to adapt as this is where they will live for years and years before someone will hear their cries for justice.

Meanwhile, life on the outside goes on without them. They miss countless graduations, birthdays, deaths, and other pivotal moments. Years later for the few who are able to migrate back home after navigating a hostile criminal justice system, they will find that freedom is very different, almost foreign.

This is another difficult journey: they’re back home and in society, but nothing is the same. And again, they must find a way to adapt and live.

The photos and stories in this exhibit will convey the physical and emotional upheaval associated with losing and re-gaining lost freedom and family. For all of the Centurion exonorees, they also find family in the brothers and sisters who have taken the same journey to freedom.

Sixty-one innocent men and women have been freed by Centurion, the first innocence organization, founded in Princeton in 1980.

As this exhibit illustrates: this could happen to anyone.

Interwoven Stories International

 

Diana Weymar developed Interwoven Stories  as 2016 Artist-in-Residence at the Arts Council of Princeton and returns to curate over 250 pages from Princeton, The Peddie School, the Nantucket Stitching Gam, the Zen Hospice Project (San Francisco), Open Space Art (Damascus, Syria), Build Peace (Colombia), the University of Puget Sound (Tacoma), Yarns/NoDominion Theatre (Jersey City), and Trans Tipping Point Project (Victoria, BC).

“This show will be a homecoming for the pages that were created in Princeton and a welcoming for pages from other places”, says Weymar. “As an international project that originated in Princeton, it’s extremely exciting to see how the pages first created in this community have inspired people around the world to create to join the collective narrative.”

 

Local Women in their Crowns: A Portraits and Stories Community Project

 

In conjunction with McCarter Theatre Center‘s production of Crowns, directed by Regina Taylor, the Arts Council of Princeton and McCarter have partnered to create Local Women in their Crowns: A Portraits and Stories Community Project.

Inspired by the book of the same name from which Crowns was created, this visual storytelling project captures portraits and the shared stories of Black women of all ages and backgrounds in their church hats. The culminating exhibition serves as a celebration of African American culture and tradition on display at the Arts Council of Princeton, the Princeton Public Library, and the lobbies of McCarter Theatre.
Photography by Bentrice Jusu and S. Bola Okoya.

[caption id="attachment_20736" align="aligncenter" width="300"] This exhibition is being held in collaborations with Migrations, a community-wide investigation of the theme of migration taking place throughout Princeton from February through May, 2018.[/caption]

Thursday, May 24

I am Innocent: The Migration Back to Freedom for the Innocent in Prison

For the thousands of wrongfully-convicted men and women in this country, their journey starts with a tremendous shock. They are arrested for a serious crime they had nothing to do with. They ultimately wind up in court and despite all evidence to the contrary, they believe it is only a matter of time before police, prosecutors and the judge will realize their mistake. But that never happens. They are locked away with little chance of ever seeing freedom again while living in the hell of maximum security prisons, surrounded by murderers, rapists, and disinterested prison guards. But they must find a way to adapt as this is where they will live for years and years before someone will hear their cries for justice.

Meanwhile, life on the outside goes on without them. They miss countless graduations, birthdays, deaths, and other pivotal moments. Years later for the few who are able to migrate back home after navigating a hostile criminal justice system, they will find that freedom is very different, almost foreign.

This is another difficult journey: they’re back home and in society, but nothing is the same. And again, they must find a way to adapt and live.

The photos and stories in this exhibit will convey the physical and emotional upheaval associated with losing and re-gaining lost freedom and family. For all of the Centurion exonorees, they also find family in the brothers and sisters who have taken the same journey to freedom.

Sixty-one innocent men and women have been freed by Centurion, the first innocence organization, founded in Princeton in 1980.

As this exhibit illustrates: this could happen to anyone.

Interwoven Stories International

 

Diana Weymar developed Interwoven Stories  as 2016 Artist-in-Residence at the Arts Council of Princeton and returns to curate over 250 pages from Princeton, The Peddie School, the Nantucket Stitching Gam, the Zen Hospice Project (San Francisco), Open Space Art (Damascus, Syria), Build Peace (Colombia), the University of Puget Sound (Tacoma), Yarns/NoDominion Theatre (Jersey City), and Trans Tipping Point Project (Victoria, BC).

“This show will be a homecoming for the pages that were created in Princeton and a welcoming for pages from other places”, says Weymar. “As an international project that originated in Princeton, it’s extremely exciting to see how the pages first created in this community have inspired people around the world to create to join the collective narrative.”

 

Local Women in their Crowns: A Portraits and Stories Community Project

 

In conjunction with McCarter Theatre Center‘s production of Crowns, directed by Regina Taylor, the Arts Council of Princeton and McCarter have partnered to create Local Women in their Crowns: A Portraits and Stories Community Project.

Inspired by the book of the same name from which Crowns was created, this visual storytelling project captures portraits and the shared stories of Black women of all ages and backgrounds in their church hats. The culminating exhibition serves as a celebration of African American culture and tradition on display at the Arts Council of Princeton, the Princeton Public Library, and the lobbies of McCarter Theatre.
Photography by Bentrice Jusu and S. Bola Okoya.

[caption id="attachment_20736" align="aligncenter" width="300"] This exhibition is being held in collaborations with Migrations, a community-wide investigation of the theme of migration taking place throughout Princeton from February through May, 2018.[/caption]