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Thursday, October 3

Art Against Racism

Multiple local venues will host Princeton’s inaugural “Art Against Racism” group exhibition and related events from September 20-30.  “Art Against Racism” is a platform to promote social justice, inclusion, equity, and anti-racist community-building through the visual arts.

The juried exhibition will feature work to be exhibited at participating organizations and businesses.  Exhibition sites include The Bayard Rustin Center for Social Justice, the Arts Council of Princeton, Princeton United Methodist Church and Unitarian Universalist Congregation of Princeton.

[caption id="attachment_25188" align="aligncenter" width="449"] Leon Rainbow
Hands Up
Mixed media on canvas[/caption]

Power of Faces

Images from the global photojournalism project by Theresa Menders and Daniel Farber Huang will be on display on the second floor of the library through November 30. Realizing that most of the nearly 69 million people displaced to refugee camps lost treasured family photos when they fled their homes, Menders and Huang bring photo printers into refugee camps around the globe, where they distribute portraits for individuals to keep. The context of refugee camps is intentionally cropped out of the images to focus on individuals, and not merely their label as “refugees”.  This photojournalism project humanizes the plight of refugees and illuminates their experiences.

 

[caption id="attachment_24854" align="aligncenter" width="1024"] Power of Faces – Greece, 2017[/caption]

Sculpture by Gyuri Hollosy


At a very young age, Gyuri Hollosy started his career in sculptured art and in the 1960’s, attended the Cleveland Institute of Art. Gaining an interest in sculptures, Gyuri began fusing materials together to create beautiful original sculpture artwork in the 1970’s. Gyuri’s artwork represents a philosophy, an emotion or a portrait of an influential figure or time period of our history.

As a bronze sculpture artist, Gyuri has been able to transform his visions into reality and create one-of-a-kind pieces of artwork. There is a detailed process involved in designing and fabricating his work; the end result is very appealing to the eye. He uses a multitude of materials and techniques to sculpt 3-dimensional figures.

You can find his work in various locations around the country. He has been recognized for his talent and is the recipient of many prestigious awards. Gyuri expanded his artistic talent and created original artwork oil paintings in addition to his sculptures. Much of what Gyuri has to offer is based upon his new language of expression through bodies that were fragmented and partial.

Gyuri hopes that you will be intrigued by the elements of strength and fragility revealed by his figures. For an in-depth insight into Gyuri Hollosy’s artistic background, you may view his biography page and also take a look at his collections page. Gyuri is available by email or telephone number, which are both listed on his contact page. Both of Gyuri’s original sculptor artwork and original artwork oil paintings are viewable on his gallery page.

Wonder

Wonder (noun); a feeling of surprise mingled with admiration, caused by something beautiful, unexpected, unfamiliar, or inexplicable. “I stood in front of it, observing the intricacy of the work with the wonder of a child”.
“When one is invited into the house of Marilyn Keating, the studio of Eric Schultz, or the world created by The Oiseaux Sisters, wonder is the best word to describe how you feel. This September, the Arts Council of Princeton’s Taplin Gallery will feature work from these artists, filling the space with kites, figures composed of scrap metal parts, paper mache birds, wooden pull toys, and so many other one-of-a-kind elements. Like a kid in a toy store, you won’t be able to stop smiling, imagining how all of these items came into being.
Marilyn Keating from Gloucester, NJ, received her BFA in sculpture from Moore College of Art in Philadelphia, PA. Throughout the last 15 years, she has concentrated much of her energy on public art, outdoor art, and community projects and currently works as a Teaching Artist for the State of New Jersey. Though skilled in many materials, Marilyn is first and foremost a woodworker. She has been the recipient of three fellowships from the New Jersey State Council on the Arts . Marilyn has participated in numerous solo and group exhibitions and her work appears in many public and private collections. She is a 2007 recipient of The George and Helen Segal Foundation Award for New Jersey sculptors. This will be her first show in Princeton.

The Oiseaux Sisters, Susan Andrews and Carolyn Fellman, creates work that incorporates humor, movement, and metaphor.  Their mixed media materials include paper, tin, clay, cloth, carved and painted wood, and found objects. They have created a series of figurative, often biographical or mythological, figures that range from small to larger than life.
The Oiseauxs honor attics, outbuildings, and collections both random and methodical. To them, all is a story. All objects are in conversation with each other: sometimes the subject, sometimes the object, sometimes the verb. But always talking. They love to make their work and are always asking, ‘Are we there yet? What is the journey and what is the destination? What is truth and what is fiction? What is memory? What is desire?
Eric Schultz’s work is a combination of emotion, spirit, and often humor brought together through distinctive techniques and his own experiences with both life and art. Eric’s goal is to open people’s minds to the diverse function and meaning of the everyday objects we create by exploring the programmed response and emotional attachment people have to their things.
Eric says, ‘I strive for the individual pieces I use to relate to the meaning of the whole form, like a sentence in a story. Only then am I able to give life back to lost and forgotten objects from the recognizable – animals, people, vehicles – to the fantastic. It is important to show that trash and waste are a matter of perspective and my art is recycling in a broader and more beautiful sense’.
Each of these artist’s work will fill the viewer with a sense of awe and delight. With summer ending and children heading back to school to ‘get serious’ again, be sure to stop by our gallery, prolong summer and renew your sense of wonder.”

-Maria Evans
Curator/Artistic Director

 

Friday, October 4

Art Against Racism

Multiple local venues will host Princeton’s inaugural “Art Against Racism” group exhibition and related events from September 20-30.  “Art Against Racism” is a platform to promote social justice, inclusion, equity, and anti-racist community-building through the visual arts.

The juried exhibition will feature work to be exhibited at participating organizations and businesses.  Exhibition sites include The Bayard Rustin Center for Social Justice, the Arts Council of Princeton, Princeton United Methodist Church and Unitarian Universalist Congregation of Princeton.

[caption id="attachment_25188" align="aligncenter" width="449"] Leon Rainbow
Hands Up
Mixed media on canvas[/caption]

Power of Faces

Images from the global photojournalism project by Theresa Menders and Daniel Farber Huang will be on display on the second floor of the library through November 30. Realizing that most of the nearly 69 million people displaced to refugee camps lost treasured family photos when they fled their homes, Menders and Huang bring photo printers into refugee camps around the globe, where they distribute portraits for individuals to keep. The context of refugee camps is intentionally cropped out of the images to focus on individuals, and not merely their label as “refugees”.  This photojournalism project humanizes the plight of refugees and illuminates their experiences.

 

[caption id="attachment_24854" align="aligncenter" width="1024"] Power of Faces – Greece, 2017[/caption]

Sculpture by Gyuri Hollosy


At a very young age, Gyuri Hollosy started his career in sculptured art and in the 1960’s, attended the Cleveland Institute of Art. Gaining an interest in sculptures, Gyuri began fusing materials together to create beautiful original sculpture artwork in the 1970’s. Gyuri’s artwork represents a philosophy, an emotion or a portrait of an influential figure or time period of our history.

As a bronze sculpture artist, Gyuri has been able to transform his visions into reality and create one-of-a-kind pieces of artwork. There is a detailed process involved in designing and fabricating his work; the end result is very appealing to the eye. He uses a multitude of materials and techniques to sculpt 3-dimensional figures.

You can find his work in various locations around the country. He has been recognized for his talent and is the recipient of many prestigious awards. Gyuri expanded his artistic talent and created original artwork oil paintings in addition to his sculptures. Much of what Gyuri has to offer is based upon his new language of expression through bodies that were fragmented and partial.

Gyuri hopes that you will be intrigued by the elements of strength and fragility revealed by his figures. For an in-depth insight into Gyuri Hollosy’s artistic background, you may view his biography page and also take a look at his collections page. Gyuri is available by email or telephone number, which are both listed on his contact page. Both of Gyuri’s original sculptor artwork and original artwork oil paintings are viewable on his gallery page.

Wonder

Wonder (noun); a feeling of surprise mingled with admiration, caused by something beautiful, unexpected, unfamiliar, or inexplicable. “I stood in front of it, observing the intricacy of the work with the wonder of a child”.
“When one is invited into the house of Marilyn Keating, the studio of Eric Schultz, or the world created by The Oiseaux Sisters, wonder is the best word to describe how you feel. This September, the Arts Council of Princeton’s Taplin Gallery will feature work from these artists, filling the space with kites, figures composed of scrap metal parts, paper mache birds, wooden pull toys, and so many other one-of-a-kind elements. Like a kid in a toy store, you won’t be able to stop smiling, imagining how all of these items came into being.
Marilyn Keating from Gloucester, NJ, received her BFA in sculpture from Moore College of Art in Philadelphia, PA. Throughout the last 15 years, she has concentrated much of her energy on public art, outdoor art, and community projects and currently works as a Teaching Artist for the State of New Jersey. Though skilled in many materials, Marilyn is first and foremost a woodworker. She has been the recipient of three fellowships from the New Jersey State Council on the Arts . Marilyn has participated in numerous solo and group exhibitions and her work appears in many public and private collections. She is a 2007 recipient of The George and Helen Segal Foundation Award for New Jersey sculptors. This will be her first show in Princeton.

The Oiseaux Sisters, Susan Andrews and Carolyn Fellman, creates work that incorporates humor, movement, and metaphor.  Their mixed media materials include paper, tin, clay, cloth, carved and painted wood, and found objects. They have created a series of figurative, often biographical or mythological, figures that range from small to larger than life.
The Oiseauxs honor attics, outbuildings, and collections both random and methodical. To them, all is a story. All objects are in conversation with each other: sometimes the subject, sometimes the object, sometimes the verb. But always talking. They love to make their work and are always asking, ‘Are we there yet? What is the journey and what is the destination? What is truth and what is fiction? What is memory? What is desire?
Eric Schultz’s work is a combination of emotion, spirit, and often humor brought together through distinctive techniques and his own experiences with both life and art. Eric’s goal is to open people’s minds to the diverse function and meaning of the everyday objects we create by exploring the programmed response and emotional attachment people have to their things.
Eric says, ‘I strive for the individual pieces I use to relate to the meaning of the whole form, like a sentence in a story. Only then am I able to give life back to lost and forgotten objects from the recognizable – animals, people, vehicles – to the fantastic. It is important to show that trash and waste are a matter of perspective and my art is recycling in a broader and more beautiful sense’.
Each of these artist’s work will fill the viewer with a sense of awe and delight. With summer ending and children heading back to school to ‘get serious’ again, be sure to stop by our gallery, prolong summer and renew your sense of wonder.”

-Maria Evans
Curator/Artistic Director

 

Saturday, October 5

Art Against Racism

Multiple local venues will host Princeton’s inaugural “Art Against Racism” group exhibition and related events from September 20-30.  “Art Against Racism” is a platform to promote social justice, inclusion, equity, and anti-racist community-building through the visual arts.

The juried exhibition will feature work to be exhibited at participating organizations and businesses.  Exhibition sites include The Bayard Rustin Center for Social Justice, the Arts Council of Princeton, Princeton United Methodist Church and Unitarian Universalist Congregation of Princeton.

[caption id="attachment_25188" align="aligncenter" width="449"] Leon Rainbow
Hands Up
Mixed media on canvas[/caption]

Power of Faces

Images from the global photojournalism project by Theresa Menders and Daniel Farber Huang will be on display on the second floor of the library through November 30. Realizing that most of the nearly 69 million people displaced to refugee camps lost treasured family photos when they fled their homes, Menders and Huang bring photo printers into refugee camps around the globe, where they distribute portraits for individuals to keep. The context of refugee camps is intentionally cropped out of the images to focus on individuals, and not merely their label as “refugees”.  This photojournalism project humanizes the plight of refugees and illuminates their experiences.

 

[caption id="attachment_24854" align="aligncenter" width="1024"] Power of Faces – Greece, 2017[/caption]

Sculpture by Gyuri Hollosy


At a very young age, Gyuri Hollosy started his career in sculptured art and in the 1960’s, attended the Cleveland Institute of Art. Gaining an interest in sculptures, Gyuri began fusing materials together to create beautiful original sculpture artwork in the 1970’s. Gyuri’s artwork represents a philosophy, an emotion or a portrait of an influential figure or time period of our history.

As a bronze sculpture artist, Gyuri has been able to transform his visions into reality and create one-of-a-kind pieces of artwork. There is a detailed process involved in designing and fabricating his work; the end result is very appealing to the eye. He uses a multitude of materials and techniques to sculpt 3-dimensional figures.

You can find his work in various locations around the country. He has been recognized for his talent and is the recipient of many prestigious awards. Gyuri expanded his artistic talent and created original artwork oil paintings in addition to his sculptures. Much of what Gyuri has to offer is based upon his new language of expression through bodies that were fragmented and partial.

Gyuri hopes that you will be intrigued by the elements of strength and fragility revealed by his figures. For an in-depth insight into Gyuri Hollosy’s artistic background, you may view his biography page and also take a look at his collections page. Gyuri is available by email or telephone number, which are both listed on his contact page. Both of Gyuri’s original sculptor artwork and original artwork oil paintings are viewable on his gallery page.

Wonder

Wonder (noun); a feeling of surprise mingled with admiration, caused by something beautiful, unexpected, unfamiliar, or inexplicable. “I stood in front of it, observing the intricacy of the work with the wonder of a child”.
“When one is invited into the house of Marilyn Keating, the studio of Eric Schultz, or the world created by The Oiseaux Sisters, wonder is the best word to describe how you feel. This September, the Arts Council of Princeton’s Taplin Gallery will feature work from these artists, filling the space with kites, figures composed of scrap metal parts, paper mache birds, wooden pull toys, and so many other one-of-a-kind elements. Like a kid in a toy store, you won’t be able to stop smiling, imagining how all of these items came into being.
Marilyn Keating from Gloucester, NJ, received her BFA in sculpture from Moore College of Art in Philadelphia, PA. Throughout the last 15 years, she has concentrated much of her energy on public art, outdoor art, and community projects and currently works as a Teaching Artist for the State of New Jersey. Though skilled in many materials, Marilyn is first and foremost a woodworker. She has been the recipient of three fellowships from the New Jersey State Council on the Arts . Marilyn has participated in numerous solo and group exhibitions and her work appears in many public and private collections. She is a 2007 recipient of The George and Helen Segal Foundation Award for New Jersey sculptors. This will be her first show in Princeton.

The Oiseaux Sisters, Susan Andrews and Carolyn Fellman, creates work that incorporates humor, movement, and metaphor.  Their mixed media materials include paper, tin, clay, cloth, carved and painted wood, and found objects. They have created a series of figurative, often biographical or mythological, figures that range from small to larger than life.
The Oiseauxs honor attics, outbuildings, and collections both random and methodical. To them, all is a story. All objects are in conversation with each other: sometimes the subject, sometimes the object, sometimes the verb. But always talking. They love to make their work and are always asking, ‘Are we there yet? What is the journey and what is the destination? What is truth and what is fiction? What is memory? What is desire?
Eric Schultz’s work is a combination of emotion, spirit, and often humor brought together through distinctive techniques and his own experiences with both life and art. Eric’s goal is to open people’s minds to the diverse function and meaning of the everyday objects we create by exploring the programmed response and emotional attachment people have to their things.
Eric says, ‘I strive for the individual pieces I use to relate to the meaning of the whole form, like a sentence in a story. Only then am I able to give life back to lost and forgotten objects from the recognizable – animals, people, vehicles – to the fantastic. It is important to show that trash and waste are a matter of perspective and my art is recycling in a broader and more beautiful sense’.
Each of these artist’s work will fill the viewer with a sense of awe and delight. With summer ending and children heading back to school to ‘get serious’ again, be sure to stop by our gallery, prolong summer and renew your sense of wonder.”

-Maria Evans
Curator/Artistic Director

 

Sunday, October 6

Festival Cultural Latino: Mercado on the Plaza

- Free and Open to the Public!

The rich cultural life of Princeton’s Latino community is celebrated with an afternoon of music, dance, food, and crafts. The plaza will be transformed into a Mercado during the three-hour event with local artisans and restaurants on-site along with family-friendly activities and free entertainment.
Co-sponsored by the Princeton Public Library, the Arts Council of Princeton and Mi Pueblo Lindo.

Art Against Racism

Multiple local venues will host Princeton’s inaugural “Art Against Racism” group exhibition and related events from September 20-30.  “Art Against Racism” is a platform to promote social justice, inclusion, equity, and anti-racist community-building through the visual arts.

The juried exhibition will feature work to be exhibited at participating organizations and businesses.  Exhibition sites include The Bayard Rustin Center for Social Justice, the Arts Council of Princeton, Princeton United Methodist Church and Unitarian Universalist Congregation of Princeton.

[caption id="attachment_25188" align="aligncenter" width="449"] Leon Rainbow
Hands Up
Mixed media on canvas[/caption]

Power of Faces

Images from the global photojournalism project by Theresa Menders and Daniel Farber Huang will be on display on the second floor of the library through November 30. Realizing that most of the nearly 69 million people displaced to refugee camps lost treasured family photos when they fled their homes, Menders and Huang bring photo printers into refugee camps around the globe, where they distribute portraits for individuals to keep. The context of refugee camps is intentionally cropped out of the images to focus on individuals, and not merely their label as “refugees”.  This photojournalism project humanizes the plight of refugees and illuminates their experiences.

 

[caption id="attachment_24854" align="aligncenter" width="1024"] Power of Faces – Greece, 2017[/caption]

Sculpture by Gyuri Hollosy


At a very young age, Gyuri Hollosy started his career in sculptured art and in the 1960’s, attended the Cleveland Institute of Art. Gaining an interest in sculptures, Gyuri began fusing materials together to create beautiful original sculpture artwork in the 1970’s. Gyuri’s artwork represents a philosophy, an emotion or a portrait of an influential figure or time period of our history.

As a bronze sculpture artist, Gyuri has been able to transform his visions into reality and create one-of-a-kind pieces of artwork. There is a detailed process involved in designing and fabricating his work; the end result is very appealing to the eye. He uses a multitude of materials and techniques to sculpt 3-dimensional figures.

You can find his work in various locations around the country. He has been recognized for his talent and is the recipient of many prestigious awards. Gyuri expanded his artistic talent and created original artwork oil paintings in addition to his sculptures. Much of what Gyuri has to offer is based upon his new language of expression through bodies that were fragmented and partial.

Gyuri hopes that you will be intrigued by the elements of strength and fragility revealed by his figures. For an in-depth insight into Gyuri Hollosy’s artistic background, you may view his biography page and also take a look at his collections page. Gyuri is available by email or telephone number, which are both listed on his contact page. Both of Gyuri’s original sculptor artwork and original artwork oil paintings are viewable on his gallery page.

Monday, October 7

Art Against Racism

Multiple local venues will host Princeton’s inaugural “Art Against Racism” group exhibition and related events from September 20-30.  “Art Against Racism” is a platform to promote social justice, inclusion, equity, and anti-racist community-building through the visual arts.

The juried exhibition will feature work to be exhibited at participating organizations and businesses.  Exhibition sites include The Bayard Rustin Center for Social Justice, the Arts Council of Princeton, Princeton United Methodist Church and Unitarian Universalist Congregation of Princeton.

[caption id="attachment_25188" align="aligncenter" width="449"] Leon Rainbow
Hands Up
Mixed media on canvas[/caption]

Power of Faces

Images from the global photojournalism project by Theresa Menders and Daniel Farber Huang will be on display on the second floor of the library through November 30. Realizing that most of the nearly 69 million people displaced to refugee camps lost treasured family photos when they fled their homes, Menders and Huang bring photo printers into refugee camps around the globe, where they distribute portraits for individuals to keep. The context of refugee camps is intentionally cropped out of the images to focus on individuals, and not merely their label as “refugees”.  This photojournalism project humanizes the plight of refugees and illuminates their experiences.

 

[caption id="attachment_24854" align="aligncenter" width="1024"] Power of Faces – Greece, 2017[/caption]

Sculpture by Gyuri Hollosy


At a very young age, Gyuri Hollosy started his career in sculptured art and in the 1960’s, attended the Cleveland Institute of Art. Gaining an interest in sculptures, Gyuri began fusing materials together to create beautiful original sculpture artwork in the 1970’s. Gyuri’s artwork represents a philosophy, an emotion or a portrait of an influential figure or time period of our history.

As a bronze sculpture artist, Gyuri has been able to transform his visions into reality and create one-of-a-kind pieces of artwork. There is a detailed process involved in designing and fabricating his work; the end result is very appealing to the eye. He uses a multitude of materials and techniques to sculpt 3-dimensional figures.

You can find his work in various locations around the country. He has been recognized for his talent and is the recipient of many prestigious awards. Gyuri expanded his artistic talent and created original artwork oil paintings in addition to his sculptures. Much of what Gyuri has to offer is based upon his new language of expression through bodies that were fragmented and partial.

Gyuri hopes that you will be intrigued by the elements of strength and fragility revealed by his figures. For an in-depth insight into Gyuri Hollosy’s artistic background, you may view his biography page and also take a look at his collections page. Gyuri is available by email or telephone number, which are both listed on his contact page. Both of Gyuri’s original sculptor artwork and original artwork oil paintings are viewable on his gallery page.

Tuesday, October 8

Art Against Racism

Multiple local venues will host Princeton’s inaugural “Art Against Racism” group exhibition and related events from September 20-30.  “Art Against Racism” is a platform to promote social justice, inclusion, equity, and anti-racist community-building through the visual arts.

The juried exhibition will feature work to be exhibited at participating organizations and businesses.  Exhibition sites include The Bayard Rustin Center for Social Justice, the Arts Council of Princeton, Princeton United Methodist Church and Unitarian Universalist Congregation of Princeton.

[caption id="attachment_25188" align="aligncenter" width="449"] Leon Rainbow
Hands Up
Mixed media on canvas[/caption]

Power of Faces

Images from the global photojournalism project by Theresa Menders and Daniel Farber Huang will be on display on the second floor of the library through November 30. Realizing that most of the nearly 69 million people displaced to refugee camps lost treasured family photos when they fled their homes, Menders and Huang bring photo printers into refugee camps around the globe, where they distribute portraits for individuals to keep. The context of refugee camps is intentionally cropped out of the images to focus on individuals, and not merely their label as “refugees”.  This photojournalism project humanizes the plight of refugees and illuminates their experiences.

 

[caption id="attachment_24854" align="aligncenter" width="1024"] Power of Faces – Greece, 2017[/caption]

Sculpture by Gyuri Hollosy


At a very young age, Gyuri Hollosy started his career in sculptured art and in the 1960’s, attended the Cleveland Institute of Art. Gaining an interest in sculptures, Gyuri began fusing materials together to create beautiful original sculpture artwork in the 1970’s. Gyuri’s artwork represents a philosophy, an emotion or a portrait of an influential figure or time period of our history.

As a bronze sculpture artist, Gyuri has been able to transform his visions into reality and create one-of-a-kind pieces of artwork. There is a detailed process involved in designing and fabricating his work; the end result is very appealing to the eye. He uses a multitude of materials and techniques to sculpt 3-dimensional figures.

You can find his work in various locations around the country. He has been recognized for his talent and is the recipient of many prestigious awards. Gyuri expanded his artistic talent and created original artwork oil paintings in addition to his sculptures. Much of what Gyuri has to offer is based upon his new language of expression through bodies that were fragmented and partial.

Gyuri hopes that you will be intrigued by the elements of strength and fragility revealed by his figures. For an in-depth insight into Gyuri Hollosy’s artistic background, you may view his biography page and also take a look at his collections page. Gyuri is available by email or telephone number, which are both listed on his contact page. Both of Gyuri’s original sculptor artwork and original artwork oil paintings are viewable on his gallery page.

Wednesday, October 9

Art Against Racism

Multiple local venues will host Princeton’s inaugural “Art Against Racism” group exhibition and related events from September 20-30.  “Art Against Racism” is a platform to promote social justice, inclusion, equity, and anti-racist community-building through the visual arts.

The juried exhibition will feature work to be exhibited at participating organizations and businesses.  Exhibition sites include The Bayard Rustin Center for Social Justice, the Arts Council of Princeton, Princeton United Methodist Church and Unitarian Universalist Congregation of Princeton.

[caption id="attachment_25188" align="aligncenter" width="449"] Leon Rainbow
Hands Up
Mixed media on canvas[/caption]

Power of Faces

Images from the global photojournalism project by Theresa Menders and Daniel Farber Huang will be on display on the second floor of the library through November 30. Realizing that most of the nearly 69 million people displaced to refugee camps lost treasured family photos when they fled their homes, Menders and Huang bring photo printers into refugee camps around the globe, where they distribute portraits for individuals to keep. The context of refugee camps is intentionally cropped out of the images to focus on individuals, and not merely their label as “refugees”.  This photojournalism project humanizes the plight of refugees and illuminates their experiences.

 

[caption id="attachment_24854" align="aligncenter" width="1024"] Power of Faces – Greece, 2017[/caption]

Sculpture by Gyuri Hollosy


At a very young age, Gyuri Hollosy started his career in sculptured art and in the 1960’s, attended the Cleveland Institute of Art. Gaining an interest in sculptures, Gyuri began fusing materials together to create beautiful original sculpture artwork in the 1970’s. Gyuri’s artwork represents a philosophy, an emotion or a portrait of an influential figure or time period of our history.

As a bronze sculpture artist, Gyuri has been able to transform his visions into reality and create one-of-a-kind pieces of artwork. There is a detailed process involved in designing and fabricating his work; the end result is very appealing to the eye. He uses a multitude of materials and techniques to sculpt 3-dimensional figures.

You can find his work in various locations around the country. He has been recognized for his talent and is the recipient of many prestigious awards. Gyuri expanded his artistic talent and created original artwork oil paintings in addition to his sculptures. Much of what Gyuri has to offer is based upon his new language of expression through bodies that were fragmented and partial.

Gyuri hopes that you will be intrigued by the elements of strength and fragility revealed by his figures. For an in-depth insight into Gyuri Hollosy’s artistic background, you may view his biography page and also take a look at his collections page. Gyuri is available by email or telephone number, which are both listed on his contact page. Both of Gyuri’s original sculptor artwork and original artwork oil paintings are viewable on his gallery page.