Recent Small Still Life Paintings Joe Kossow

March 9 - March 25





Joe Kossow received a Master in Fine Arts degree from The American University in Washington, DC in 1982. He was fortunate to have studied with Ben Summerford,Robert D’Arista, and Jack Boul. In 1983, he co-founded the Washington Studio School with Lee Newman, Carlton Fletcher, Jack Boul, Susan Yanero, David Holt, Jo Weiss, and Katie Murray. Joe taught at the Washington Studio School and local Washington area colleges for 8 years.

He was awarded the Elizabeth Greenshields prize in 1983. His work has been shown in the DC area, Pennsylvania, and in Paris and Nancy, France. He had a series of solo and group shows throughout the 1980s.

Joe decided that to raise a family the way he wanted to he needed to earn a more substantial income, so he left the art world in 1990. He went back to school where he received a Master in Business Administration from the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania in 1992. He worked in corporate life from then until his retirement in 2016. Joe painted and drew just enough over those years to prevent complete and total rust from setting in.

2017 marked Joe’s return to painting full time. In Joe’s words: “I paint as I did before, only with substantially more patience and maturity.”

More Exhibitions

Waves and Ripples

This project is a celebration of water and a metaphor for life and human emotions.

Our Universe – From Here to Infinity

“I became interested in astronomy and the nature and scope of our universe when I first started to learn about these things in elementary school. But then decades passed where I focused on other things in life. In 1999, my interest in astronomy was rekindled by my friend/colleague Kirk Alexander who was at the time the Director of the Amateur Astronomers Association of Princeton (AAAP). I bought myself a telescope and a tracking mount and tried to have a visual look at things from the

LUMINOUS MATTER

My work LUMINOUS MATTER channels the forces of fluid dynamics. I achieve this otherworldly look in my artwork by combining pigments, fluids, and additives to produce a physical reaction. Layering different densities of paint leads to the formation of cellular structures that echo natural processes. Some of my results are comparable to phenomena that can be observed in astronomy, such as the Rayleigh-Taylor instability seen in The Crab Nebula. To create my paintings, I myself mimic the forces of nature by using multiple types of

Donor Wheel

More than 2,000 donors are acknowledged in this one-of-a-kind sculpture by Joshua Kirsch

Neighborhood Portrait

The Neighborhood Portrait Quilt is part of a permanent exhibition that tells a story of important leaders and residents.