Sculpture Jim Perry

May 3 - September 30

Graves Terrace | Jim Perry’s sculpture is “…animated by its contradictions …stability and movement within the same work.”

Jim Perry received a BA in sculpture from Bard College, where he studied with sculptor Jake Grossberg and painters Murray Reich and Jim Sullivan. He began his sculpture career in the early 1970s in New York City where he exhibited extensively, and in 1975 was included in the Whitney Biennial. In addition to his work as an artist, Jim had a 28-year career as a graphics editor at The New York Times. He left The Times in 2008 to return to making sculpture full-time.
 
Since then, Jim has had solo exhibits at Morpeth Contemporary, Hopewell, NJ (2010); and at Gremillion & Company Fine Arts, Houston, TX (2011, 2013). He has also been included in numerous juried and invitational exhibitions including those at Ellarslie City Museum in Trenton, NJ, Philips Mill Gallery in New Hope, PA, Noyes Museum of Art in Oceanville, NJ, Morris Museum in Morristown, NJ, and Dalet Gallery and the LG Tripp Gallery, both in Philadelphia. He is represented by Gremillion & Company Fine Arts.
 
About Jim Perry’s work, artist Steven Alexander wrote, “Embodied in the graceful curves, torqued tensions and sensuous materiality of Jim Perry’s sculpture is a fundamental process of transforming feeling into form, and a perpetuation of our ancient fascination with the very nature of being.” Curator Kate Somers observes that “Perry’s sculpture is animated by its contradictions,” stating that there is “a sense of stability and movement within the same work.
 
Jim’s work is held in many private and corporate collections including the Art for Healing Initiative at the University Medical Center of Princeton at Plainsboro, where his piece, “Allegro,” can be seen in the atrium of the David and Patricia Atkinson Pavilion. Jim is a member and former president of the Princeton Artists Alliance. He lives in Princeton with his wife, painter Hetty Baiz.

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