The Princeton Paper Crane Project

August 1 - August 29

The Princeton Paper Crane Project is a celebration of love, eternal strength, and resiliency of the human spirit.

 

The Princeton Paper Crane Project was developed in the spring of 2020 when a symbol of hope was needed most.

 

 Led by Miya Table and Home, the Princeton Paper Crane Project is an exercise of hope and healing. In Japanese culture, the crane is a symbol of longevity and peace. Senbazuru (a thousand cranes) is a well-known tradition in Japan that promises to grant a wish to anyone who folds 1,000 cranes. 

 

Miya and the Arts Council, with support from Mr. Ross Wishnick, invited our community to participate by folding and donating paper cranes to this public art installation. We were blown away by the enthusiasm of our neighbors, families, and friends old and new as cranes began pouring in by beginner and experienced folders alike.

 

Participants were encouraged to decorate their cranes with images, special messages, or names of loved ones to make a personalized wish.  

 

After installing 10,000+ colorful paper cranes in our Taplin Gallery, we invite you to walk among the colorful flow of cranes in a celebration of love, eternal strength, and resiliency of the human spirit.

 

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More Exhibitions

Donor Wheel

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Neighborhood Portrait

The Neighborhood Portrait Quilt is part of a permanent exhibition that tells a story of important leaders and residents.